Coral Reefs

  • Coral reefs are large underwater structures composed of the skeletons of colonial marine invertebrates called coral.
  • Corals are of two types: Hard coral and Soft coral.
  • The coral species that build reefs are known as hermatypic, or “hard,” corals because they extract calcium carbonate from seawater to create a hard, durable exoskeleton that protects their soft, sac-like bodies.
  • Other species of corals that are not involved in reef building are known as “soft” corals. Soft corals, such as sea fingers and sea whips, are soft and bendable and often resemble plants or trees. These corals do not have stony skeletons, but instead grow wood-like cores for support and fleshy rinds for protection.
  • Deep-sea corals live in much deeper or colder oceanic waters and lack zooxanthellae. Unlike their shallow water relatives, which rely heavily on photosynthesis to produce food, deep sea corals take in plankton and organic matter for much of their energy needs.
Sunlight: Corals need to grow in shallow water where sunlight can reach them. Corals depend on the zooxanthellae (algae) that ...
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Reef-building corals have a symbiotic relationship with photosynthetic algae called zooxanthellae, which live in their tissues. The coral provides a ...
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Fringing reefs: reefs that grow close to the shore and extend out into the sea like a submerged platform. Eg- ...
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Most reefs are located between the Tropics of Cancer and Capricorn, in the Pacific Ocean, the Indian Ocean, the Caribbean ...
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Although they cover less than 0.1 per cent of the earth’s surface, coral reefs are the most bio diverse marine ...
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Corals are the basis for the formation of other ecosystems:g. the grazing of coral formations by parrotfish leads to the ...
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Coral reefs are in decline around the world. Threats to coral reefs come from both local and global sources. Local ...
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When water is too warm, corals will expel the algae (zooxanthellae) living in their tissues causing the coral to turn ...
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Corals are included in Schedule-I list of the Wild Life Protection Act, 1972: Ministry of Environment and Forest vide its ...
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