Measures or recommendations given by relevant committees to address any concerns associated with Civil service in India

Recommendations of 2nd ARC for civil service reforms:

  • Bringing Accountability in Public Services:
  • Multi-dimensionality of accountability
  • system of two intensive reviews
  • Civil Services Law
  • Emphasize Performance:
  • Making appraisal more consultative and transparent,
  • performance management system (PMS),
  • “360 degree” performance appraisal mechanism
  • Competition and Specialist Knowledge for Senior Level Appointments:
  • 2nd ARC identified 12 domains,
  • Surendra Nath Committee (2003)
  • Hota Committee (2004)
  • Effective Disciplinary Regime:
  • Minimum statutory disciplinary and dismissal procedures.
  • Consultation with the UPSC should be mandatory
  • Transforming Work Culture:
  • Multi-level hierarchical structure should be reduced.
  • Government offices should be modernized,
  • Need to create a lean, thin and efficient government machinery
  • Streamline Rules and Procedures:
  • Rules should be updated, simplified
  • Privatization and Contracting Out:
  • competition between public and private sector providers have improved cost effectiveness and service quality.
  • Adoption of IT and E-Governance:
  • Robust Vigilant Mechanism, Centralized Public Grievance Redressal and Monitoring System (CPGRAMs)
  • Implementation of e-Office.
  • Stability of Tenure:
  • Fixed tenure of at least three years
  • Civil Services Board / Establishment Board.
  • Depoliticization of Civil Services:
  • Need to safeguard the political neutrality and impartiality, “abuse of authority unduly favouring or harming someone”,
  • Obstruction of justice should be classified.
  • Capacity building
  • Training
  • Code of Ethics,
  • Mid-career exams/skill assessment

 

Way forward:

  • In a democracy it is essential that the politicians play the role of masters assisted by the civil servants. However, the extent of interference of the bureaucracy in the affairs of the state is crossing every limit.
  • This is mostly because of the bow-down policy and inefficiency of our political leadership.
  • The political leaders should be able to spell out their requirement to the bureaucracy and distinguish the jurisdiction of the bureaucracy in the affairs of the state.
  • Only then will the bureaucracy remain confined within their jurisdiction and consider themselves as the servants of the people.
  • After the first ten years of service each IAS officer should be encouraged to specialise in one or two chosen sectors by not only giving them long tenures but even permitting them to join academic or research organisations where they could improve their intellectual skills.
  • a model in which politicians would be casteist, corrupt and will harbour criminals, whereas civil servants will continue to be efficient, responsive to public needs and change-agents cannot be sustained indefinitely. In the long run administrative and political values have to coincide.
  • In his article demanding ban on bureaucrats entering politics the retired high level bureaucrat Madhav Godbole has stated that politics and administration should have separate status and if it is jeopardized, the very spirit of the constitutional provision would be eroded.