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UPSC Insights SECURE SYNOPSIS: 4 JULY 2024

NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same.

 


General Studies – 1


 

Topic: Art and Culture

Q1. How do the outcomes of the UNESCO Heritage Committee session contribute to global heritage preservation efforts? (250 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: The Hindu

Why the question:

India to host UNESCO World Heritage Committee session in New Delhi from July 21.

Key Demand of the question:

Examine the contributions of the UNESCO Heritage Committee session’s outcomes to global heritage preservation, highlighting specific initiatives, policies, and their impacts.

Structure of the Answer:

Introduction:

Introduce the role of the UNESCO Heritage Committee in preserving global cultural and natural heritage.

Body:

  1. Explain how the designation of new World Heritage Sites raises awareness and brings international attention to significant cultural and natural landmarks. Highlight the benefits of such recognition, including increased tourism, funding for conservation, and enhanced local and international collaboration.
  2. Then, discuss the development and dissemination of best practices for the conservation and management of heritage sites.
  3. Analyze the importance of monitoring and reporting mechanisms established by the committee to assess the condition of heritage sites.
  4. Detail the committee’s efforts in providing technical assistance and capacity-building programs to member states.
  5. Discuss how the outcomes of the committee session address emerging challenges such as climate change, urbanization, and armed conflicts.

Conclusion:

Summarize the significant contributions of the UNESCO Heritage Committee session to global heritage preservation efforts.

Introduction

The UNESCO World Heritage Committee sessions typically held annually, focus on the identification, protection, and conservation of cultural and natural heritage sites of outstanding universal value. The significance of these sessions extends beyond mere documentation, impacting global heritage preservation efforts profoundly.

Body:

Contribution of the UNESCO Heritage Committee session to global heritage preservation efforts:

  1. Inscription of New Sites: This recognition helps to raise awareness about the cultural and natural heritage of the sites and promotes their preservation.
    1. For instance, the addition of the Harappan city of Dholavira in India not only highlights the ancient civilization’s ingenuity but also galvanizes efforts for its conservation through increased funding and tourism.
  2. State of Conservation Reports: These assessments help identify threats such as environmental degradation, urban development, and climate change.
    1. For example, the annual reviews of the Sundarbans, have led to heightened measures to combat the impact of rising sea levels and industrial pollution.
  3. Provision of assistance: The Committee provides technical and financial assistance to World Heritage sites, especially those in developing countries. This support is crucial for the preservation and restoration of sites facing significant threats.
    1. g. The restoration of the Humayun’s Tomb in Delhi
  4. Policy development and best practices: These guidelines help countries manage their heritage sites more effectively.
    1. For instance, the adoption of sustainable tourism practices in sites like Hampi, Karnataka.
  5. International Cooperation: Through workshops, training programs, and collaborative projects, countries enhance their technical expertise and knowledge in heritage conservation.
    1. g. The Indian initiative to train Afghan archaeologists in preserving the ancient fortress of Bala Hissar.
  6. Heritage in Danger List: Sites at risk are placed on the List of World Heritage in Danger, drawing global attention and resources for their preservation.
    1. g. The Western Ghats in India, listed for its rich biodiversity, has benefited from increased conservation efforts.

Conclusion

Thus, the collaborative and comprehensive approach adopted by the Committee not only safeguards cultural and natural treasures for future generations but also promotes global unity in preserving our shared heritage.

 

Topic: World history

Q2. Describe the significance of the Treaty of Dunkirk and the Brussels Pact in the lead-up to NATO’s formation. (150 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: The Hindu

Why the question:

In 2024, NATO celebrates 75 years of collective defence. Understanding the Treaty of Dunkirk and the Brussels Pact is crucial as they were foundational steps that led to the creation of NATO, shaping post-World War II European security and cooperation.

Key Demand of the question:

Examine the roles of the Treaty of Dunkirk and the Brussels Pact in the events that preceded and facilitated the establishment of NATO.

Structure of the Answer:

Introduction:

Introduce the context of post-World War II Europe, emphasizing the need for security and mutual defense against potential threats.

Mention the Treaty of Dunkirk and the Brussels Pact as key agreements in this period.

Body:

  1. Describe the Treaty of Dunkirk, signed between France and the United Kingdom. Explain its primary purpose, Highlight its significance as a first step toward collective security in Western Europe.
  2. Describe the Brussels Pact, also known as the Treaty of Brussels, explain its objectives, Highlight the military component in treaty.
  3. Then, analyze how the Treaty of Dunkirk and the Brussels Pact demonstrated a commitment to collective security and mutual defense among Western European nations.
  4. Next, discuss how the principles and framework established by the Treaty of Dunkirk and the Brussels Pact influenced the negotiations leading to the North Atlantic Treaty.

Conclusion:

Summarize the critical roles of the Treaty of Dunkirk and the Brussels Pact in fostering collective defense and cooperation among Western European nations.

Introduction

The Treaty of Dunkirk (1947) and the Brussels Pact (1948) were crucial agreements in the post-World War II period, setting the stage for the formation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) in 1949. These treaties represented early efforts by Western European nations to secure collective security against the potential threat of Soviet expansionism.

Body:

Significance of the Treaty of Dunkirk (1947) and the Brussels Pact in the lead-up to NATO’s formation:

  1. Treaty of Dunkirk (1947): Signed on March 4, 1947, between France and the United Kingdom, the Treaty of Dunkirk was initially aimed at mutual assistance against potential aggression from Germany.
    • The treaty established a mutual defense agreement, stipulating that both nations would support each other in the event of an attack by Germany. It also included clauses on economic cooperation and support.
    • Although primarily directed against Germany, the Treaty of Dunkirk laid the groundwork for broader European security arrangements.
    • It highlighted the need for collective security and mutual defence, principles that would later underpin NATO.
  2. Brussels Pact: signed on March 17, 1948, expanded on the Treaty of Dunkirk. It included five Western European countries: Belgium, France, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom.
    • The Brussels Pact established the Western Union Defence Organization (WUDO), which coordinated military defense efforts among the signatory countries. It also contained provisions for collective self-defence and mutual assistance in case of an attack on any member.
    • The Brussels Pact was a significant step towards institutionalizing collective security in Western Europe.
    • It demonstrated the willingness of Western European nations to cooperate closely in defense matters and laid the foundational structures for broader transatlantic security cooperation.

Lead-up to NATO’s formation:

  1. Integration and Expansion: The Treaty of Dunkirk and the Brussels Pact showcased the effectiveness and necessity of collective security arrangements.
    1. These treaties served as precursors to more extensive security frameworks involving North America.
  2. US Involvement: The increasing Soviet threat and the Berlin Blockade (1948-1949) underscored the need for a transatlantic alliance. The United States, recognizing the importance of European stability for global security, became a driving force behind the formation of NATO.
  3. Formation of NATO: The North Atlantic Treaty was signed on April 4, 1949, in Washington, D.C., creating NATO. The Treaty incorporated the mutual defense principles of the Brussels Pact and expanded them to include the United States, Canada, and several Western European countries.
  4. Article 5: The core of NATO’s founding treaty, Article 5, reflected the mutual defense commitment seen in the Dunkirk and Brussels agreements. It stated that an armed attack against one or more NATO members would be considered an attack against them all, necessitating a collective response.

 

Conclusion

These two agreements laid the groundwork for the broader and more robust transatlantic alliance that NATO would become. The legacy of these early treaties is evident in NATO’s enduring role as a cornerstone of international security and defence cooperation.

 

 

 


General Studies – 2


 

Q3. The Smart Cities Mission, which was launched to change the urban landscape of India has produced mixed results. Discuss. Highlight the challenges faced in executing the Mission. (150 words)

 Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: The Hindu

 Why the question:

The Centre has extended the Smart Cities Mission (SCM) under the Union Urban Development Ministry till March 31, 2025.

Key Demand of the question:

To evaluate the outcomes of the Smart Cities Mission and identify the challenges faced in its implementation.

Directive:

Discuss – This requires a detailed examination of the mixed results of the Smart Cities Mission and the challenges encountered in executing it.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Begin by briefly explaining the objective of the Smart Cities Mission.

Body:

  1. First part: Discuss the mixed results of the Smart Cities Mission.

Highlight some successes, such as improved urban infrastructure, better service delivery, and enhanced use of technology in governance.

Mention areas where the mission has fallen short, like uneven development and delays in project completion.

  1. Second part: Highlight the challenges faced in executing the Mission.

Issues such as funding constraints and bureaucratic hurdles.

The lack of coordination between various stakeholders and inadequate citizen participation.

Challenges related to technological adoption and integration in existing urban systems.

Conclusion:

Emphasise the need for better planning, coordination, and stakeholder engagement to fully realise the mission’s potential.

Introduction:

The Smart Cities Mission (SCM), launched by the Government of India in June 2015, aimed to promote sustainable and inclusive urban development. It envisaged creating 100 smart cities through various initiatives, focusing on improving infrastructure, enhancing service delivery, and leveraging technology for better governance. However, it has produced mixed results with overall 49% of projects still pending at the end of the Mission’s six-year period.

Body:

 

Achievements of the Smart Cities Mission:

  1. Infrastructure Development:
  • Investment in urban infrastructure, including roads, public transport, and utilities.
  • Development of green spaces and smart parks.
  • Example: As of July, 2021, 51% of 5,196 projects for which work orders were issued have been completed.
  1. Technological Integration:
  • Implementation of smart solutions like intelligent traffic management systems.
  • Use of GIS mapping for better urban planning and management.
  • Example: Smart City Centers (SCC) have already been established in more than 10 cities such as Ahmedabad, Vadodara, Surat, Pune, Nagpur etc.
  1. Enhanced Service Delivery:
  • Improved delivery of public services through e-governance platforms.
  • Development of smart grid systems for efficient energy management.
  1. Citizen Participation:
  • Involvement of citizens in the planning and development process.
  • Use of mobile apps and online platforms to gather feedback and suggestions from residents.

Challenges Faced in Executing the Mission:

  1. Financial Constraints:
  • Insufficient funding and delays in financial disbursements.
  • Reliance on Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) which have faced slow implementation.
  1. 2. Administrative and Governance Issues:
  • Bureaucratic hurdles and inter-agency coordination problems.
  • Delays in project approvals and execution due to complex regulatory frameworks.
  1. Technological and Infrastructure Gaps:
  • Inadequate technological infrastructure and digital illiteracy.
  • Challenges in integrating old infrastructure with new smart technologies.
  1. Socio-Economic Disparities:
  • Inequitable development, with benefits often not reaching marginalised communities.
  • Displacement and resettlement issues arising from urban redevelopment projects.
  1. Environmental Concerns:
  • Environmental degradation due to large-scale construction activities.
  • Challenges in ensuring sustainable development practices.

 

Conclusion:

To make Smart Cities the cities that work for the people” there needs to be certain steps taken. For instance, the aim of the mission should be in convergence with other city projects and breaking through the silos of various government departments. An enabling environment including governance frameworks, policy protocols, capacities of Urban Local Bodies, and the nature of citizen-government engagement needs to be developed to further improve the urban space.

 

Q4. Far-right parties once considered fringe are predicted to make major gains. Illustrate. How does this impact India’s relations with Europe? (150 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: Times of India

 Why the question:

UN rights chief warns about rise of far-right in Europe.July 7 France elections could see the country’s first far-right government since the World War II Nazi occupation.

Key Demand of the question:

To illustrate the rise of far-right parties in Europe and analyze its potential impact on India’s relations with Europe.

Directive:

Illustrate – This requires providing examples of the rise of far-right parties and explaining the consequences for India-Europe relations.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Begin by highlighting the recent surge in support for far-right parties in Europe, once considered fringe but now poised to make significant gains.

Body:

  1. First part: Illustrate the rise of far-right parties.

Provide examples of countries where far-right parties are gaining momentum, such as France’s National Rally and Italy’s Brothers of Italy.

Mention the factors contributing to their rise.

  1. Second part: Impact on India’s relations with Europe.

Potential changes in diplomatic and trade relations, as far-right parties often prioritise nationalist policies that could affect international cooperation.

Possible shifts in Europe’s stance on immigration and multiculturalism, which may impact Indian diaspora and businesses in Europe.

Consider the broader geopolitical implications like climate change and security.

Conclusion:

Emphasise the need for India to navigate these changes strategically to maintain and strengthen its ties with European nations.

Introduction:

In recent years, Europe has witnessed a significant surge in support for far-right parties, which were once considered fringe elements in the political landscape.

Body:

 

The Rise of Far-Right Parties in Europe:

  1. Electoral Gains: Far-right parties have experienced substantial electoral success across Europe. They have either increased their vote share or have become part of the coalition governments. Eg. Italy, Germany. Sweden.
  2. Mainstream Acceptance: Far-right parties have moved from the political fringes to gain mainstream acceptance. These parties capitalize on public concerns about immigration, national identity, and sovereignty.
  3. Policy Influence: Even without holding majority power, far-right parties influence national policies.: Increased Euro-scepticism and nationalist sentiments have affected countries’ stances towards the European Union.

Impact on Indias Relations with Europe:

  1. Trade and Economic Relations:
  • Protectionism: Far-right parties often advocate for protectionist policies, which could complicate trade negotiations with India.
  • Bilateral Agreements: Stricter immigration and labour policies might affect Indian professionals and businesses operating in Europe.
  1. Geopolitical and Strategic Relations:
  • Alignment with the US: Far-right parties’ preference for closer ties with the US might influence Europe’s strategic priorities, impacting India-EU relations.
  • EU Fragmentation: Increased Eurocepticism could weaken the EU’s cohesion, affecting collective agreements and partnerships with India.
  1. Cultural and Social Impact:
  • Immigration Policies: Stricter immigration controls could affect the Indian diaspora in Europe, impacting social and cultural ties.
  • Human Rights: Far-right stances on human rights issues may lead to divergent positions between India and European nations on global platforms.

However, shared interests in counter-terrorism and economic growth could provide common ground for collaboration.

 

Conclusion:

As far-right parties continue to gain ground in Europe, it is imperative for India to navigate these changes strategically. Proactive diplomacy, adaptable economic strategies, and fostering cultural exchanges will be crucial in ensuring that India’s relations with Europe remain robust and resilient amidst this evolving political landscape.

 

 

 

 


General Studies – 3


 

Topic: Indian Economy/Financial Markets

Q5. How does SEBI contribute to the regulation and development of fair and transparent markets in India while promoting corporate governance? (150 Words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: Indian Express

Why the question?
A year and a half after the explosive Hindenburg Report on Adani, the Indian regulator SEBI has accused the US-based short seller of malpractice.

Key Demand of the question:

Evaluate SEBI’s contributions to market regulation, development, and corporate governance.

Structure of the Answer:

Introduction:

Overview of SEBI’s establishment and objectives.

Body:

Roles of SEBI: Issuers of securities, capital market players, financial intermediaries.

Regulatory Functions: Monitoring and guidelines for intermediaries, audits, and fees.

Protective Functions: Preventing fraud, investor education.

Development Functions: Training, promoting fair trading.

Corporate Governance: Enhancing investor confidence, enforcing compliance.

Conclusion:

Summary of SEBI’s impact and the need for continued improvements.

Introduction

SEBI is a statutory body established in 1992 with functions to protect the interests of investors in securities and to promote and regulate the securities market.

 

Body:

In order to achieve its objectives, SEBI takes care of the three most important financial market participants.

  • Issuer of securities: SEBI ensures that the issue of IPOs and FPOs can take place in a transparent and healthy way.
  • The traders and investors: SEBI is responsible for ensuring that the investors don’t become victims of any stock market manipulation or fraud.
  • Financial Intermediaries: SEBI monitors the activities of the stock market intermediaries like brokers and sub-brokers.

 

Role of SEBI in the regulation and development of fair capital markets in India are:

  • Protective Functions: SEBI performs these functions to protect the interests of the investors and financial institutions. Protective functions include:
    • Checking price rigging, and prevention of insider trading. In 2017, SEBI imposed a penalty on Reliance Industries for alleged insider trading.
    • Promoting fair practices, creating awareness among investors and prohibition of fraudulent and unfair trade practices.
  • Regulatory Functions: Through regulatory functions, SEBI monitors the functioning of the financial market intermediaries.
    • It designs the guidelines and code of conduct for financial intermediaries and regulates mergers, amalgamations, and takeovers takeover of companies.
    • SEBI also conducts inquiries and audits of stock exchanges. It acts as a registrar for brokers, sub-brokers, merchant bankers and many others.
    • SEBI has the power to levy fees on the capital market participants.
    • SEBI also regulates the credit rating agencies.
  • Development Functions: Among the list of SEBI’s development functions, one of them is imparting training to intermediaries.
    • SEBI promotes fair trading and malpractice
    • It also educates and makes investors aware of the stock market by utilizing the funds available in IEPF.
      • SEBI’s advisory committee on IPEF is mandated to recommend investor education and protection activities for the utilization of the SEBI Investor Protection and Education Fund (IPEF).
    • Role in Corporate Governance: SEBI’s objective in promoting good corporate governance is to enhance investor confidence, protect investor interests, and foster sustainable and transparent business practices in the Indian securities market.
      • Eg: SEBI proposed new Environment, Social, and Governance (ESG) norms for listed entities.

 

Limitations of SEBI

  • SEBI has certain limitations in terms of its reach, enforcement powers, coordination with other regulatory bodies, resources, and keeping up with changing market dynamics.
    • Eg: SEBI’s alleged inaction in the Ketan Parekh scam and Satyam scandal,
  • Failure of SEBI’s regulations to prevent the misuse of participatory notes (P-notes) by foreign investors.
  • Misuse of advanced technology is also a limitation on the SEBI regulatory role.
    • Eg: Co-Location scam which SEBI identified recently shows a loophole in the system.

 

Conclusion:

Overall, through its regulatory oversight, surveillance activities, enforcement actions, and investor protection initiatives, SEBI promotes fair and transparent markets in India. By ensuring compliance with regulations and fostering good corporate governance practices, SEBI contributes to the development of a robust and trustworthy securities market ecosystem.

 

Topic: Indian Economy/Foreign Investments/ LPG Reforms

Q6. Explain the significance of Foreign Institutional Investment (FII) and Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) for the Indian economy. Analyse the reasons for the recent decline in FDI inflows. Also, suggest measures to enhance FDI in India. (250 Words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: Indian Express

Why the question?

Modinomics aims to boost investment and promote “Make in India,” but global investors remain hesitant, and domestic firms are reluctant, particularly in manufacturing. As a new term begins, the key question is: What has gone wrong? Why is FDI declining and overall investment stagnant?

Key Demand of the question:
Discuss the importance of FII and FDI, reasons for declining FDI, and measures to boost FDI.

Structure of the Answer:

Introduction:

Brief explanation of FII and FDI.

Body:

Significance for Indian Economy: Economic growth, employment, technology transfer.

Reasons for Decline in FDI: Policy uncertainty, infrastructure issues, global economic trends.

Measures to Enhance FDI: Policy reforms, improving infrastructure, ease of doing business.

Conclusion:

Summary of FII and FDI importance and strategies for increasing FDI inflows.

Introduction:

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) is an investment made by a firm or individual in one country into business interests located in another country. On the other hand, foreign institutional investment (FII) is portfolio investment in the stock market by buying shares and debentures in another country by foreign institutions like mutual funds, insurance and pension funds etc.

 

Body:

Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and Foreign Institutional Investment (FII) play significant roles in an economy, albeit in different ways:

  1. Foreign Direct Investment (FDI):
  • Long-term Investment: FDI involves direct investment in physical assets such as factories, infrastructure, and real estate. This contributes to the expansion of productive capacity and stimulates economic growth.
  • Technology Transfer: MNCs often bring advanced technologies, managerial expertise, and best practices to the host country, enhancing productivity and competitiveness.
  • Employment Generation: FDI creates direct and indirect employment opportunities across various sectors, reducing unemployment and improving living standards.
    • Eg: Companies like Walmart and IKEA have entered the Indian retail market through FDI routes.
  • Boost to Exports: FDI can lead to increased exports as companies integrate into global value chains and access new markets.
    • Eg: Ford, Hyundai, Honda, and Suzuki have established production facilities in the country for domestic and export needs.

 

  1. Foreign Institutional Investment (FII):
  • Portfolio Investment: FIIs involve investment in financial assets such as stocks, bonds, and other securities traded in financial markets.
  • Market Liquidity: FIIs contribute to market liquidity and depth, enhancing the efficiency of financial markets by increasing trading volumes and reducing bid-ask spreads.
  • Currency Impact: Fluctuations in FII flows can impact exchange rates, influencing currency volatility and affecting export competitiveness and inflation.
  • Access to Capital: FIIs provide access to international capital markets, allowing businesses and governments to raise funds at competitive rates.
    • Eg: During bullish phases in the stock market, FIIs increase their investments.

However, a recent RBI report shows that Net foreign direct investment (FDI) flows into India dropped 62.17 per cent to $10.58 billion in 2023-24 (FY24).

 

Reasons for the decline of the FDI & FII could be:

  • Global Economic Uncertainty: Uncertainty in the global economic environment, exacerbated by factors such as trade tensions, geopolitical conflicts, and the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Policy Changes and Reforms: Changes in regulatory frameworks or policy uncertainty can deter foreign investors.
  • Sector-Specific Challenges: Certain sectors in India face specific challenges that deter FDI inflows. For example, sectors like retail, e-commerce, and multi-brand retail have faced regulatory restrictions.
    • Eg: The issue of retrospective taxation hampers investment.
  • Slowdown in Global Demand: The slowdown in global demand, particularly in key export markets due to the Russia-Ukraine war and Middle East conflicts.
  • Currency Fluctuations and Exchange Rate Stability: Currency volatility and fluctuations in the exchange rate can impact investor confidence.
    • g.: Depreciation of rupees is a cause of concern lately.

 

Some measures that can be taken to boost FDI and FII in India are:

  • Special Economic Zones (SEZs): Expand and develop SEZs with world-class infrastructure and facilities to attract FDI in manufacturing and exports.
    • Eg: Model similar to GIFT city in Gujarat needs to be recreated all over India.
  • Simplify Procedures: Reduce bureaucratic hurdles and streamline approval processes for setting up businesses and obtaining permits. Relaxation of government-approved FDIs.
  • Enhance Business Environment: Continuously improve the ease of doing business ranking by implementing reforms that simplify business regulations.
    • g.: Liberal investment policy by the government and SEBI is needed.
  • Promote Innovation Ecosystem: Support research and development initiatives, foster innovation clusters, and encourage collaborations between domestic and foreign firms.
  • Anti-Corruption Measures: Implement stringent anti-corruption measures and promote transparency in business transactions to build investor trust and confidence.

 

Conclusion:

In order to make India a developed nation by 2047, the Government need to move towards liberal market reforms. Full capital convertibility and internationalisation of the rupee could be the move in the right direction to achieve it.

 

 

 


General Studies – 4


 

Q7. What does this quote means to you? (150 words)

 “Children learn more from what you are than what you teach.” – W.E.B. Du Bois

Difficulty level: Easy

Why the question:

For some parents, it can be a challenge to understand their children completely. In order to help them, South Korea has come up with the concept of “Happiness Factory”.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by explaining the literal meaning of the quote and highlighting role of parents in inculcating values among children.

Body:

  • Write about the various ways in which children learn.
  • Highlight how children learn through observing family and society members.
  • Mention the role of parents in inculcating behaviour and value. Substantiate with examples.

Conclusion:

Summarise by highlighting the importance of the quote in the present day.

Introduction:

The quote encapsulates a profound insight into the influence of role modelling and personal example in education. It suggests that the behaviour, values, and character traits demonstrated by adults have a deeper impact on children than formal instruction alone.

 

Body:

Children observe and internalize the ethical conduct and integrity demonstrated by adults in their daily actions. For example, Personal integrity and honesty shown by adults leave a lasting impression on children, influencing their own ethical standards.

Adults who display empathy and compassion towards others teach children the importance of understanding and caring for others’ feelings and well-being. Children learn empathy not only through words but also through witnessing empathetic actions in their caregivers.

Respectful behaviour towards others, regardless of differences, teaches children the value of respect and inclusivity. For example, using of saying Namaste comes to a child while watching others.

Acts of kindness shown by adults towards others teach children the power of kindness in building positive relationships and fostering a supportive community. Kindness demonstrated consistently becomes a guiding principle for children in their interactions with others. For example charity of food to needy people in the street.

 

However, in some cases, the children learn the unethical aspect too from observation. In order to reverse it and bring children to an ethical path one needs to teach them the values and morals. For example child can pick up father-mother behaviour and adopt the mentality of the patriarchy. Such cases need moral education to be taught to children.

 

Conclusion:

This quote underscores the importance of authenticity and consistency in adult behaviour, emphasizing that teaching by example is a powerful tool for instilling virtues and guiding children towards positive development.

 

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