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[Mission 2023] Insights SECURE SYNOPSIS: 25 January 2023

 

NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same


General Studies – 1


 

Topic: History of the world will include events from 18th century such as industrial revolution, world wars, redrawal of national boundaries, colonization, decolonization, political philosophies like communism, capitalism, socialism etc.— their forms and effect on the society.

1. Simon Bolivar was a soldier and statesman who led the revolutions against Spanish rule and was at the forefront of Latin American independence movement. Discuss. (250 words)

Difficulty level: Easy

Reference: History of modern world by Jain & Mathur

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 1 and mentioned as part of Mission-2023 Secure timetable.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the contributions of Simon Bolivar to Latin American independence.

Directive word: 

Discuss – This is an all-encompassing directive – you must debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You must give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by giving brief description of Simon Bolivar – who is known as The Liberator.

Body:

First write about the political philosophy of Simon Bolivar and that penned two political treatises—the Cartagena Manifesto and the Letter from Jamaica.

Next write about his military achievements – encouraging the people of South America to rebel against Spanish colonial rule, leading multiple expeditionary forces against the Spaniards, liberated territories etc.

Conclusion:

Conclude by summarising that his contributions earned him the epithet – The Liberator from the Latin American people.

Introduction

Simón Bolívar was a South American soldier who was instrumental in the continent’s revolutions against the Spanish empire. Simon Bolivar from 1813 to 1824 liberated many South American countries and later tried to organize them into a US type federation in form of Gran Columbia. He freed Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia from the Spanish rule through an armed revolt.

Body

Political philosophy of Simon Bolivar

  • Young Bolívar moved to Spain in 1799 after the deaths of his parents and was associate of Napoleon, until he returned to Venezuela in
  • When Napoleon named Joseph Bonaparte King of Spain and its colonies, which included Venezuela, Bolívar joined the resistance movement.
  • The resistance group based in Caracas gained independence in 1810, and Bolívar travelled to Britain on a diplomatic mission. The fight for control of Caracas, Venezuela and most of South American continued on back home.
  • Finally, Bolívar returned to Venezuela and began a campaign to wrest control of that country from the Spanish.
  • The Cartagena Manifesto was written by Simón Bolívar during the Colombian and Venezuelan War of Independence, after the fall of the First Republic, explaining what he believed to be the causes of this loss. It was written in Cartagena de Indies, on 15 December 1812.
    • Bolivar advocated a strong central government and powerful executive to avoid infighting between city, state, and national authorities, which in his view created stalemate, dissipating funds and energy.
  • He and his followers invaded Venezuela on May 14, 1813; this marked the beginning of his “Campaña Admirable” (Admirable Campaign), which resulted in the formation of the Venezuelan Second Republic later that year.
  • Bolívar was hailed as El Libertador (The Liberator), though civil war soon erupted in the republic, forcing him to flee to Jamaica and seek foreign aid.
  • There he wrote his famous “Letter From Jamaica,” detailing his vision of a South American republic with a parliamentary setup modelled after England and a life-long president. His idea of being a nation’s chief who could not be removed from power would be heavily critiqued by other leaders and intellectuals.

Military achievements of Bolivar

  • Gaining support from Haiti, Bolívar returned to his home continent and became involved in a number of military battles, eventually able to claim several territories.
  • 1821 saw the creation of the Gran Colombia, under Bolívar’s leadership.
  • This federation included much of what is now Venezuela, Colombia, Panama and Ecuador.
  • Further manoeuvres saw him named Dictator of Peru in 1824, followed by the creation of Bolivia in 1825.
  • Bolívar had succeeded in uniting much of South America in a federation free from Spanish control, but the government was fragile.
  • Despite his desire to create a union of states similar to that which created the United States of America, Bolívar faced opposition from internal factions throughout the huge Gran Colombia, with there being a push to form single nations.
  • As a temporary measure, Bolívar declared himself dictator in 1828, though in September of the same year he escaped an assassination attempt with aid from his mistress and fellow revolutionary Manuela Sáenz.
  • He resigned this post in 1830 and made plans to sail for exile in Europe.

Conclusion

On December 17, 1830, however, Simón Bolívar died in Santa Marta, Colombia, after a battle with what may have been tuberculosis. Today, Bolívar’s legacy can be seen in the multitude of statues and plaza squares bearing his likeness throughout South and North America.

 

Topic: History of the world will include events from 18th century such as industrial revolution, world wars, redrawal of national boundaries, colonization, decolonization, political philosophies like communism, capitalism, socialism etc.— their forms and effect on the society.

2. Although independence was achieved, but many newly independent African states went through a period political crisis leading rise of autocrats and economic stagnation leading to severe hunger and poverty. To what extent, can the colonists be blamed for post-independence crises in Africa? (250 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: History of modern world by Jain & Mathur

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 1 and mentioned as part of Mission-2023 Secure timetable.

Key Demand of the question: 

To write about the problems faced by African nations after independence, and the role played by the Colonialism in their misery.

Introduction: 

Introduce the answer by writing about decolonisation of Africa and how it took place.

Body:

The problems faced by independent African nations were not very different. List the common problems, and use examples. Also cite some unique problems that plagued individual African countries (ex: apartheid in South Africa), Civil wars in western Africa, emergence of dictators etc.

Mention the impact of the above on African countries and link it with present day.

Next, write about the role played the colonists in the above crises – highlighting how African countries to this day are being affected by their colonial past.

Conclusion:

Conclude by mentioning a balanced opinion.

Introduction

Between 1945 and 1960, three dozen new states in Asia and Africa achieved autonomy or outright independence from their European colonial rulers. There was no one process of decolonization. In some areas, it was peaceful, and orderly. In many others, independence was achieved only after a protracted revolution. A few newly independent countries acquired stable governments almost immediately; others were ruled by dictators or military juntas for decades, or endured long civil wars.

Body

Background

  • The process of decolonization coincided with the new Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States, and with the early development of the new United Nations.
  • Decolonization was often affected by superpower competition, and had a definite impact on the evolution of that competition.
  • It also significantly changed the pattern of international relations in a more general sense.
  • The creation of so many new countries, some of which occupied strategic locations, others of which possessed significant natural resources, and most of which were desperately poor, altered the composition of the United Nations and political complexity of every region of the globe.

Problems faced by independent African nations

  • Lack of manufacturing capacity: These new countries also lacked the manufacturing infrastructure to add value to their raw materials.
    • Rich as many African countries were in cash crops and minerals, they could not process these goods
    • : Kwame Nkrumah – the first prime minister and president of Ghana – knew, political independence without economic independence was meaningless.
  • Lack of infrastructure: One of the most pressing challenges African states faced at Independence was their lack of infrastructure.
    • European imperialists prided themselves on bringing civilization and developing Africa, but they left their former colonies with little in the way of infrastructure.
  • Lack of National Identity: The borders Africa’s new countries were left with were the ones drawn in Europe during the Scramble for Africa with no regard to the ethnic or social landscape on the ground.
  • Straight line countries: There was, before the arrival of Europeans, no such territory as ‘Nigeria’ or ‘Mali’, ‘Namibia’ or ‘Gabon’; these were arbitrarily made-up places designed to suit European priorities.
    • These nations pushed together ethnic groups that had over centuries usually had nothing to do with one another, spoke different languages, worshipped different religions and had long histories of rivalry and suspicion.
  • Series of military coups: Post-colonial West Africa has had more than its fair share of military coups. The 1960s were called the decade of coups in the sub-region.
    • g.: The coup syndrome began in Togo in January 1963, when the army deposed and killed President Sylvanus Olympio.
    • Nigerian army leader General Johnson Aguiyi-Ironsi seized power also in January 1966 and killed Prime Minister Tafawa Balewa.
  • Cold war: Cold War politics also presented an opportunity for factions that sought to challenge the new governments.
    • g.: In Angola, the international support that the government and rebel factions received in the Cold War led to a civil war that lasted nearly thirty years.

 

Impact of the above on African countries

  • Little regard for the National Constitution: As soon as a civilian government is overthrown, the military junta puts aside the Constitution, proscribes all political activities and rules by decree.
    • This is a very undemocratic behaviour on the part of the military rulers.
  • Human rights abuses: Military rulers have little regard for the rights and freedoms of the individual.
    • The arbitrary arrest, detention and killings of politicians and others connected with the ousted regime and massive destruction or looting of property are disturbing features of military rule.
  • The fallacy of rescuing the state: In the majority of the coups that have occurred, the military has sometimes deemed it a national and patriotic obligation to rescue the country from total collapse and restore lost national prestige.
    • But this is not always the case. Most military regimes have turned out to be more corrupt, oppressive and self-seeking than the civilian governments they toppled.
  • Pervasive poverty: Africa today is one of the most under developed continents and hosts the world poorest and starved population on earth.
  • Genocides: The worst genocides in history took place in Rwanda, where millions were killed.

Conclusion

In spite of the abundant natural resources that most African countries possess, they are still economically poor and under-developed. The living standards of the people are very low and basic social services are deplorable. The roots of the major socio-economic problems facing African countries today can be traced back to the colonial period and the influence of neo-colonialism.

 


General Studies – 2


 

Topic: Issues relating to development and management of Social Sector/Services relating to Health, Education, Human Resources.

3. Developing inclusive and accessible schools will help challenge perceptions about children with disabilities and actualise the zero-rejection policy in schools. Examine.  (250 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: The Hindu

Why the question:

A UNESCO 2019 report mentioned that CWD comprise 1.7% of the total child population in India (Census 2011). As they are faced with physical, institutional, socioeconomic and communication barriers from an early age, more than 70% of five-year-olds with disabilities in India have never attended any educational institution, the report said. Many CWD also tend to drop out of school as they grow older.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the efforts at achieving inclusivity for children with disabilities in schools and steps need to realise it.

Directive word: 

Examine – When asked to ‘Examine’, we must investigate the topic (content words) in detail, inspect it, investigate it and establish the key facts and issues related to the topic in question. While doing so we should explain why these facts and issues are important and their implications.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin the answer by giving statistic regarding the children with disabilities in India.

Body:

First, write about the issues faced children with disabilities – rejection at schooling, lack of education, lack of opportunities, poverty etc.

Next, write about the steps that are needed to address the above issue.

Conclusion:

Conclude by writing a way forward.

Introduction

A UNESCO 2019 report mentioned that CWD Children with Disabilities comprise 1.7% of the total child population in India (Census 2011). As they are faced with physical, institutional, socioeconomic and communication barriers from an early age, more than 70% of five-year-olds with disabilities in India have never attended any educational institution, the report said. Many CWD also tend to drop out of school as they grow older.

Body

Statistics: Children with Disabilities

  • There are more than 78 lakh children with disabilities in India between 5-19 years.
  • Only 61% of children were attending an educational institution.
  • About 12% had dropped out, while 27% had never been to school at all.
  • There are fewer girls with disabilities in schools than boys
    • School enrollment: In this regard more girls with disabilities get left behind than boys.

 

Issues and barriers children face

  • Inaccessible school buses in India, especially for rural children suffering from disabilities.
  • Inaccessible facilities in schools (drinking water facilities, canteens and toilets) that are not designed to be inclusive of all children.
  • Inappropriate infrastructure in classrooms (uncomfortable seating, slippery flooring and low illumination).
  • Misinformed attitudes and perceptions among parents, teachers, staff, and communities.
  • The lack of teaching and learning practices that integrate inclusive technologies and digital equipment to engage the child, such as assistive devices, are additional challenges.
  • Accessible infrastructure within schools, such as ramps or tactile paths, are either in deficit or have not been constructed utilizing suitable materials.

 

Way forward

  • To motivate all children to meaningfully participate in all indoor and outdoor activities without barriers or limitations, the school ecosystem has to be made safe, accessible, and reliable.
  • The cooperation, involvement, and sensitisation of parents and caregivers, teachers, school management authorities, and the local government departments are required so that all these barriers are actively addressed.
  • Inclusion through interactive training sessions and simulation exercises that encourage empathy-building.
    • It can go a long way in creating inclusive spaces.
  • Developing inclusive and accessible schools will be a big step towards not only challenging perceptions about CWD, and the associated discrimination, but also in actualizing the zero-rejection policy in schools.
  • A multi-pronged participatory approach towards providing an enabling environment for the empowerment of future citizens is needed to ensure that stakeholders in the school ecosystem collectively work towards promoting accessibility and inclusion in schools.
  • Five principles:
    • Equitability, usability and durability, affordability, cultural adaptability, and aesthetic appeal.
    • They should be embedded from the planning to implementation to evaluation stages of providing infrastructure services in schools.

 

Conclusion

To motivate all children to meaningfully participate in all indoor and outdoor activities without barriers or limitations, the school ecosystem has to be made safe, accessible, and reliable. Leave no one behind attitude  by Sabka prayas can lead to Sabka Vikas.

 

Topic: Bilateral, regional and global groupings and agreements involving India and/or affecting India’s interests.

4. The Global South has always displayed a spirit of third-world solidarity despite stiff resistance from the developed countries. However, the Global South needs to intensify the normative battle to correct the structural inequalities in euro-centric international law to better reflect its concerns. Examine (250 words)

Difficulty level: Tough

Reference: The Hindu

Why the question:

The ‘Voice of the Global South’ summit that India recently organised bringing together 120-odd developing countries is a commendable step. This will add moral heft to India’s G-20 presidency. In today’s multi-polar world, where the boundaries between the Global North and South are getting blurred due to the realignment of interests, this summit has brought back the focus on the Global South.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the need of global south to correct the structural inequalities international law.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by giving context.

Body:

Frist, write about how global south has displayed solidarity right since cold war era. Mention the steps and initiatives taken by the global south.

Next, write about the current world of rising challenges and structural inequalities in the international law and how global south can work towards addressing them. Elaborate upon – pandemic response, climate crisis preparedness, promoting food security and improving diasporic ties.

Conclusion:

Conclude by writing a way forward.

Introduction

The ‘Voice of the Global South’ summit that India recently organised bringing together 120-odd developing countries is a commendable step. This will add moral heft to India’s G-20 presidency. In today’s multi-polar world, where the boundaries between the Global North and South are getting blurred due to the realignment of interests, this summit has brought back the focus on the Global South. In many ways, the summit rekindled memories of the historic 1955 Afro-Asian Conference held in Bandung, Indonesia, of which India was a key architect.

Although the world is not the same as it was in the 1950s and 60s (characterised by post-colonial solidarity), and NAM has lost much of its steam, the recent summit has underlined India’s leadership in championing the cause of the Global South in the last seven decades.

Body

Addressing structural inequalities and challenges: Global South solution

  • International law’s doctrines and principles have a distinct euro-centric character that, in turn, has created several structural imbalances when viewed from the perspective of the Global South.
    • While respecting international law is important, the Global South simultaneously needs to intensify the normative battle to correct these structural inequalities so that international law can better reflect its concerns.
    • Making international environmental law principles, like common but differentiated responsibilities, more meaningful and implementing international trade law principles like special and differential treatment are examples of this normative battle.
    • But this also means that the Global South needs to deploy more resources to develop its intellectual capacities, such as by nurturing the academic community, to take on the hegemony of the Global North in the marketplace of ideas and research.
  • Concomitantly, the Global South needs to reinvigorate other international organisations that it has created, to serve its interests.
    • An important organisation in this regard is the Asian African Legal Consultative Organisation (AALCO), created immediately after the Bandung conference. AALCO, which has its headquarters in Delhi, is meant to serve as an advisory body to its member states in international law.
    • Countries like India should scrutinise AALCO’s performance and strengthen it with more resources for improved outcomes.
    • Likewise, other regional institutions such as BIMSTEC (Bay of Bengal Initiative for Multi-Sectoral Technical and Economic Cooperation) and SAARC should be bolstered to deepen South-South cooperation.
  • NIEO 2.0: Now is the time for the Global South to launch an NIEO 2.0 movement, which should decry the growing protectionism in the West, especially in the United States, and rising unilateralism, which is deeply undermining the Global South’s ability to benefit from international trade.
    • Already plans are afoot on this front at the U.N. with more than 100 developing countries, including India, sponsoring a new NIEO resolution last year.
    • The Global South needs to build and sustain momentum on this initiative.

Steps that India must take

  • India has the capabilities to take adequate care of its national interests and play a central role in ensuring peace, prosperity and security around the world.
  • From the era of non-alignment to bilateral strategic partnerships to memberships of multilateral groupings such as SCO, BRICS, QUAD and now I2U2, Indian diplomacy has smartly engineered its move to achieve its national economic and strategic objectives.
  • Under its Neighbourhood First Policy, India has been supplying power to Bangladesh and Nepal while championing a South Asian Association for Regional Cooperation electricity grid.
    • Besides, India has been liberal in extending aid to its neighbours whenever required.
    • India must work to a well thought out strategy to achieve its well-deserved place in the emerging world order.
  • India can make a collective call for reforms in the UNSC. If not, then efforts must be taken to make UNGA ultimate authority to decide on international security.
  • India’s presence in Indian ocean and being net security provider in the region is already noted by littoral states and India must go on to leverage this to stop Chinese dominance.
  • Bilateral tie-ups with Japan in Asia-Africa Growth Corridor must come into fruition. Quad can counter Chinese narrative in the South China Sea.
  • India can use its closeness to Russia to negotiate a peace deal with Ukraine.

 

Conclusion and way forward

  • The way to manage the global agenda in a multivalent world order is to accept complexities, contradictions, and contrariness as realities
  • Delink issues from one another to prevent singular difference from overwhelming other functional relations.
  • Decentralize global negotiating forums from one another; devise diverse ways to work on issues that are distinctly different.
  • Encourage varying clusters of country officials to lead on different issues; nurture plurilateral leadership groups by rotating their composition from issue to issue
  • Embrace variety and avoid blocs; invite innovation; focus on substance; and dial back on polemics.

 


General Studies – 3


 

Topic: Indian Economy and issues relating to planning, mobilization, of resources, growth, development and employment.

5. Tourism is considered to be important for the country’s economy. It is a multi-segment industry which brings in a lot of economic value & associated benefits. Discuss the positive economic effects of tourism. (250 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: The Hindu

Why the question:

Today is National Tourism Day (January 25) and the Ministry of Railways, in partnership with the Ministry of Tourism, is launching its Jagannath Yatra train package, an eight-day tour that begins in from Delhi, traverses Kashi, Baidyanath Dham, Jagannath Puri, Bhubaneshwar and Konark, and ends at the Vishnupad temple in Gaya. All this is linked to using Bharat Gaurav Trains (or theme-based tourist circuit trains) to highlight India’s rich cultural heritage and history.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the potential of tourism sector in India and the steps that India needs to take to boost tourism in the country.

Directive word: 

Discuss – This is an all-encompassing directive – you must debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You must give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by giving statistic related to tourism in India.

Body:

First, write about the status of tourism in India. Give facts and figures related to revenue and forex earnings, tourist footfalls. Also highlight the diverse nature of tourist circuits in the country.
Highlight the areas where work is needed – security, infrastructure, connectivity and so on. give
details of these three aspects

Next, Mention the steps taken by the government in improving the aforementioned areas through
schemes and programmes like PRASAD, e tourist visa etc. Discuss the steps that need to be taken still to fill in the gaps.

Conclusion:

Conclude by writing a way forward.

Introduction

Every region in India is identified with its handicraft, fairs, folk dances, music and its people. Hence, India is a country with a great potential for tourism. The tourism industry employs a large number of people, both skilled and unskilled. It promotes national integration and international brotherhood. There is no other country in the world which offers such a wide choice of destinations like India.

Body

Background

Today is National Tourism Day (January 25) and the Ministry of Railways, in partnership with the Ministry of Tourism, is launching its Jagannath Yatra train package, an eight-day tour that begins in from Delhi, traverses Kashi, Baidyanath Dham, Jagannath Puri, Bhubaneshwar and Konark, and ends at the Vishnupad temple in Gaya. All this is linked to using Bharat Gaurav Trains (or theme-based tourist circuit trains) to highlight India’s rich cultural heritage and history.

Tourism Status in India

  • In the Pre- pandemic times, tourism sector contributed ~US$ 250 billion in 2018 to India’s GDP.
  • It crumbled down to US$ 122 billion in 2020 due to pandemic.
  • The share of Tourism to GDP has hovered around ~5-6%. With post-pandemic recovery, the tourism industry is  expected to reach US$ 512 billion by 2028.
  • In 2020, the Indian tourism sector accounted for 39 million jobs, which was 8% of the total employment in the country. By 2029, it is expected to account for about 53 million jobs.
  • India ranked 34th in the Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Report 2019 published by the World Economic Forum.
  • Data show that domestic tourism has recovered to pre-pandemic levels, even exceeding it in some cases. This is evident in a record 1.84 crore domestic tourists visiting Jammu and Kashmir in 2022

Positive effects of Tourism in India

  • Employment generation: Tourism sector provides diverse opportunities for jobs like in hospitality/hotels/accommodation, transportation, tour guides, travel operations etc.
  • Revenue Generation: Tourism contributes 6.23% to the national GDP and 9.3% of the total employment in India. More than 20 million people are now working in the India’s tourism industry.
  • Source of Foreign Exchange Earnings:Tourism Sector was the third-largest foreign exchange earner for the country in 2019. Tourism is an important source of foreign exchange earnings in India. This has favorable impact on the balance of payment of the country. By 2028, Indian tourism and hospitality is expected to earn US$ 50.9 billion as visitor exports compared with US$ 28.9 billion in 2018.
  • Preservation of National Heritage and Environment:Tourism helps preserve several places which are of historical importance by declaring them as heritage sites. For instance, the Taj Mahal, the Qutab Minar, Ajanta and Ellora temples, etc. would have been decayed and destroyed, if the efforts had not been taken by Tourism Department to preserve them. Likewise, tourism also helps in conserving the natural habitats of many endangered species.
  • Developing Infrastructure:Tourism tends to encourage the development of multiple-use infrastructure that benefits the host community, including various means of transports, health care facilities and sports centers, in addition to the hotels and high-end restaurants that cater to foreign visitors. The development of infrastructure has in turn induced the development of other directly productive activities.
  • Promoting Peace and Stability:The tourism industry can also help promote peace and stability in developing country like India by providing jobs, generating income, diversifying the economy, protecting the environment and promoting cross-cultural awareness. However, key challenges like adoption of regulatory frameworks, mechanisms to reduce crime and corruption, etc, must be addressed if peace-enhancing benefits from this industry are to be realized.

Measures needed to boost Tourism sector

  • Infrastructure: The Government has been increasing investments in strengthening of the country’s road and rail networks and promoting port development is a significant driver for the growth of the Tourism sector. The Adarsh Station Schemeis helping modernize railway stations, while the Regional Connectivity Scheme – UDAN (Ude Desh ka Aam Nagrik), is helping make air travel more economical and widespread to hitherto unserved routes. The Swadesh Darshan and PRASHAD schemes aim to stimulate growth in niche tourism segments such as religious, heritage, wellness, medical, adventure, MICE, wildlife etc. Under the Swadesh Darshan Scheme, the Government has launched several theme based circuits like Buddhist circuit which covers destinations associated with the life of Lord Buddha.
  • Promotional Campaign: Promotional activities such as the Incredible India 2.0campaign focuses on niche tourism products including yoga, wellness, luxury, cuisine wildlife among others. “Find the Incredible You” Campaign focuses on the promotion of niche tourism products of the Country on digital and social media.
  • Information Helpline: The government has introduced the concept of e-tourist and e-medical visaswhich has helped increase inbound tourists to the country. Additional initiatives such as Atithi Devo Bhava, a 24×7 multi-lingual Tourist Helpline, among others have helped improve the safety and security of tourists. On a pilot basis, an ‘Incredible India Helpline’ has been set up to guide the tourists.
  • Safety: The Ministry of Tourism has adopted a code of conduct for safe tourism, which contains a set of guidelines to encourage tourism activities to be undertaken with respect to basic rights like dignity, and  safety of both tourists and local residents, in particular women and children.
  • Investment: The government allows 100% Foreign Direct Investment in the Travel and Tourism sector through the automatic route to increase investments across the sector. More recently, the GST rate cut on hotel room tariffs across the board has been a positive move for the industry and is expected to boost the sector’s competitiveness globally.
  • Cleanliness and Hygiene: Major cleanliness campaign has been launched under the Swachh Bharatmovement for protecting and preserving the sanctity of monuments of national heritage. The Ministry of Tourism has also launched awareness campaign to ensure cleanliness of surroundings and help create a Swachh Bharat, Swachh Smarak.
  • Assistance to States: Financial assistance to states, including places of religious importance, for various tourism projects in consultation with them subject to availability of funds, inter-se priority, liquidation of pending utilisation certificates and adherence to the scheme guidelines.
  • Digital Database: In September 2021, the Government launched NIDHI 2.0(National Integrated Database of Hospitality Industry), a scheme which will maintain a hospitality database comprising accommodation units, travel agents, tour operators and others. NIDHI 2.0 will facilitate digitalisation of the tourism sector by encouraging hotels to register themselves on the platform.
  • Skilling: The Ministry of Tourism has introduced the Incredible India Tourist Facilitator(IITF) and Incredible India Tourist Guide (IITG) Certification Programme to create an online learning platform of well-trained tourist facilitators and guides across the country.

Way forward

  • The government should continue to promote India’s diversity and rich heritage to re-establish its position as a tourist paradise.
  • The promotional campaigns should target both domestic and foreign tourists. Similarly, the extent of theme-based tourist circuits can be expanded.
  • Tourism sector has a potential to provide lot of livelihood opportunities in smaller cities/towns. Upskilling and Reskilling can help address the issue of jobless growth.
  • The government should also promote green and sustainable tourismto tackle issues relating to water crisis, pollution, waste management, etc.
  • There is need to balance the promotion of tourism with safeguarding the physical, social, and cultural environment in the destination areas.
  • The Government should further reform the tourist visa norms and processes to facilitate tourism. The Government should also explore the possibility of expanding the visa-on-arrival facility.
  • The focus should also be on supporting and promoting the emerging segments of tourism.

Conclusion

If the goal of positioning of India as one of the world’s best tourism destinations by 2047, there is need to integrate various schemes of different ministries. Need to involve various stakeholders, and local communities; necessary interventions at urban and rural level should be a priority.

 


General Studies – 4


 

Topic: Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators;

6. What does this quote means to you? (150 words)

“What wisdom can you find greater than kindness.” ― Jean Jacques Rousseau

Difficulty level: Moderate

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 4 and part of ‘Quotes Wednesdays’ in Mission-2023 Secure.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by explaining the literal meaning of the quote and highlighting its core meaning.

Body:

Write about the importance of Kindness and compassion. Write about how kindness can be source of wisdom and things it can teach us. Substantiate with examples.

Conclusion:

Summarise by highlighting the importance of the quote.

Introduction

Kindness is a behavior marked by ethical characteristics, a pleasant disposition, and concern and consideration for others. It is considered a virtue, and is recognized as a value in many cultures and religions. It is the quality of being friendly, generous, and considerate. Affection, gentleness, warmth, concern, and care are words that are associated with kindness.

Body

Kindness is greatest wisdom

  • Everyone is fighting their own inner battle: although life brings us so many joys and victories, it is undeniable that we each face our own individual struggles within our own minds that nobody knows about. Make every effort to find compassion for others – even when you can’t relate. Be kind.
  • Human connection is paramount: In a world where we are looking down at our phones more than we are looking up at the people around us, we need to revisit this idea of truly connecting with another human being and what that looks like for us. Be kind.
  • We are losing ourselves: Sometimes we get so caught up in making sure that everyone around us is well and that other people’s perceptions of us are as we wish them to be, that we forgot ourselves in the mix. Practice self- kindness and know that your feelings and your thoughts matter. Be kind.
  • You make a difference: Our words, our energy and our light have the potential to impact another human being’s life in so many ways. Don’t take that power lightly. Be kind.
  • It feels good to be kind: Robert Ingersoll’s famous quote that states “We rise by lifting others”. Supporting others gives us a natural high. Unfortunately, we all get so caught up in the “busy-ness” of our own lives that we forget to take the time to practice acts of kindness. Take a moment and step outside of yourself and raise somebody up who needs your support. Be kind.
  • Kindness is contagious: When people are in the presence of kindness, they can’t help but feel joyful. Expand your reach and watch all of those around you enliven in the presence of your warmth. Be kind.
  • Small actions can have far-reaching consequences: There is no doubt that the human race is connected in more ways than we can quantify. When you do good, you cause a ripple effect on our planet that reaches the masses. Be kind.
  • You can be a voice for someone who doesn’t have one: Acts of altruism speak volumes for those whose voices have been silenced. Speak up for someone who needs it and you will give them to opportunity to learn how to speak on their own behalf. Be kind.
  • Somebody is watching you: We are so much more influential than we realize. The next generation is observing and picking up our cues and how to treat others. Set a good example by being an ambassador for thoughtfulness and mindfulness. Be kind.
  • Judgement hurts: We need to elevate the consciousness of the planet by seeking to understand rather than to judge. When we judge another, we are essentially judging ourselves and creating separation between ourselves and those around us. The healing of the world begins with each of us. Be kind.
  • Kindness is in our nature: Human beings are intuitively geared to be good and do good. Fear is a learned emotion. Reconnect to the part of you that is love and allow that to guide your everyday interactions. Be kind.
  • Spread love: We have the same power to spread good as those who wish to spread hate do. Find a way to share your unique light. A simple smile or a positive thought on social media goes a long way. Be kind.

Conclusion

It seems that kindness is steadily fading from modern society. The lack of generosity and friendliness that is evident today is shocking. It’s important to realize the positivity that kindness can produce in our lives. Kindness is ultimately a key contributor to happiness. Acting with kindness is a win-win. Not only can it provide someone with a sense of pride by acting kindly towards others, but it also has the potential to boost the confidence and provoke bliss in those around us.

 

Topic: Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators;

7. What does this quote means to you? (150 words)

“If you cry because the sun has gone out of your life, your tears will prevent you from seeing the stars.” ― Rabindranath Tagore

Difficulty level: Moderate

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 4 and part of ‘Quotes Wednesdays’ in Mission-2023 Secure.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by explaining the literal meaning of the quote and highlighting its core meaning.

Body:

Write about the importance of focussing on the positive side after a setback/loss. Mention the lessons or opportunities that are present in failure and that can lead to further success. Highlight the role of patience and perseverance. Substantiate with examples.

Conclusion:

Summarise by highlighting the importance of the quote.

Introduction

Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore’s thoughts are so deeply soaked in his philosophy of Man, Life and God. The quote talks about picking up pieces of life when we feel that everything is lost and to rebuild it. Grief, loss, failure is part of life, but it is how we deal with it, that will define the future. One may grieve endlessly about the loss but they won’t be able to progress and achieve anything if they get stuck up on the past.

Body

When we are obsessed with the biggest goal of our life, we become blind to the galaxy of joys we find all along our journey. Such an attitude will only put us in a constant craving for success, while finding the life hopeless, unenjoyable and boring. Instead, we must find ways to enjoy life and love every bit of our life so that the whole of our lives becomes an enjoyable and fulfilling experience.

If we cannot deal with loss, we cannot live an effective life. Sometimes, failure and loss can be life-altering. But if we do not process these challenges as they come, we will wallow in sorrow every day of our lives—whether we dwell on previous losses, current failures, dreams dying, or unmet expectations, personal or professional, with family or with friends.

As leaders, we must develop the skill and ability to handle loss and failure in a way that is healthy and healing. Otherwise, we will be consumed with emotions and unproductive thoughts and become paralyzed, unable to move forward.

Conclusion

Failure is a part of life, and we must accept it. It is real, and it hurts. It also cuts deep and can separate those who go on to achieve success and those who give up and turn back on their goals. Think about failure or loss differently, and your approach to both it, and the future, will be different.


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