Print Friendly, PDF & Email

[Mission 2023] Insights SECURE SYNOPSIS: 23 November 2022

 

NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same


General Studies – 1


 

Topic: Social empowerment

1. Although constitutionally banned, untouchability is still practised in India. Examine the reasons for it and suggest steps that must be taken to purge the social evil of untouchability from the society. 250 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: Indian Express

Why the question:

The recent incident in Heggotara village in Chamarajanagar district of Karnataka, wherein ‘upper caste’ community members drained an entire tank because a thirsty Dalit woman drank from it, is extremely disturbing.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the reasons for prevalence of untouchability and measures needed to end it.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by giving context.

Body:

First, write about the reasons for the prevalence of untouchability – lack of awareness of rights, caste domination, oppression etc.

Next, write about the measures that can be taken to put an end to untouchability in the country.

Conclusion:

Conclude by writing a way forward.

Introduction

Dalits or untouchables are officially known as Scheduled Castes since the Government of India Act, 1935. Caste system, which according Dr BR Ambedkar is ordained by the Hindu religious scriptures, has placed untouchables outside the Chaturvarna system of social division and imposed oppressive and in human rules of treatment against them. According to the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB), crime against Dalits – ranging from rape, murder, beatings, and violence related to land matters increased by 29 percent from 2012 to 2014.

 

Body

Background

Despite strong laws including SC/ST Prevention of Atrocities Act 1989, Untouchability Act 1955 and various constitutional provisions like Art 15(2) (no discrimination at public place), Art 17(untouchability), Art. 23(prevention of bonded labour) have been framed but have failed to this discrimination.

These laws have politically and legally emboldened the dalits but socially have failed to be realised due to lack of awareness, poor reporting, police apathy etc. It is important to address the following concerns rather than making stronger legislation which are strong enough on paper

Reasons for prevalence of untouchability in India

  • Political:
    • Dalit movement, like identity movements across the world, has really narrowed its focus to forms of oppressions.
    • Most visible Dalit movements have been around issues like reservations and discrimination in colleges, and these are issues that affect only a small proportion of the Dalit population.
  • Social:
    • Today Dalits are perceived as a threat to the established social, economic and political position of the upper caste. Crimes are a way to assert the upper caste superiority.
    • Stasis in farm income over the past few years caused disquiet among predominantly agrarian middle caste groups, who perceive their dominance in the countryside to be weakening.
    • The growing scramble for Dalit votes by different political actors has only added a fresh twist to a conflict that has been simmering for some time.
  • Economic:
    • Rising living standards of Dalits appears to have led to a backlash from historically privileged communities.
    • In a study by Delhi School of Economics, an increase in the consumption expenditure ratio of SCs/STs to that of upper castes is associated with an increase in crimes committed by the latter against the former
    • Rising income and growing educational achievements may have led many Dalits to challenge caste barriers, causing resentment among upper caste groups, leading to a backlash.
    • There is also a possibility of the rise due to high registration and recognition of such crimes.
    • Half of all atrocities committed against Dalits are related to land disputes.
  • Educational Institutions:
    • In public schools, Dalits are not allowed to serve meals to superior castes; they often have to sit outside the classroom; and are made to clean the toilets.
    • Even in universities most of the faculty vacancies reserved for them are lying vacant and students are often discriminated.
    • The recent incidents of suicides of Rohith Vemula and Payal Tadvi substantiate the above claims of discrimination against Dalit students.
  • Dalit women:
    • Girls face violence at a younger age and at a higher rate than women of other castes. According to the National Family Health Survey by the age of 15, 33.2% scheduled caste women experience physical violence. The figure is 19.7% for “other” category women.
    • The violence continues, largely due to a sense of impunity among dominant castes.
    • Dalit women and girls are often the targets of hate crimes. Access to justice has been abysmal, with conviction rates at a measly 16.8 percent. Crimes against Dalits usually see half the conviction rate of the overall rate of conviction of crimes. Experts and activists say that low conviction rates and lack of prosecution of such cases of atrocities are the reasons why crimes against Dalits continue to rise.
  • Political power does not help:
    • Even when Dalit women acquire political power, as when they are elected as sarpanches, there is often no protection against the social power that sanctions violence and discrimination against them.
    • In a village with a Dalit woman sarpanch, a Dalit woman was burned, but no action was taken.
  • Workplace violence:
    • The risky workplaces compounded with a lack of labour rights protection measures render migrants Dalit women more vulnerable to occupational injury.
    • Further, the emerging problem of sub-contracting short-termed labour makes it more difficult for them to claim compensation when they are injured at work places.
    • Dalit women are most vulnerable to abuse and exploitation by employers, migration agents, corrupt bureaucrats and criminal gangs.
    • The enslavement trafficking also contributes to migration of large proportion of Dalit women.

Measures needed

  • Attitudinal change need to brought about among the upper caste through the use of local Panchayat level officials who need to disseminate information regarding the rights, legal provisions and ensure community places are open to all.
  • Police need to sensitised to take due notice of violation of dalits rights and act stringently rather than turning a blind eye.
    • Dalits fear reporting such crimes fearing backlash in the community they live. Such barriers need to be dispelled by strengthening and reaching out to them through institution already in place namely Nation commission for SCs etc.
  • Sensible labour laws reforms to give exit options to Dalits trapped in a system.
  • Integrating social and cultural transformation with an economic alternative is critical.
  • Huge investments will be needed in upskilling and educating dalits and government needs to create an abundance of new jobs within the formal sector and lowering barriers to job creation
  • Increased availability of stable-wage jobs for women is critical to preventing their socio-economic exploitation
  • Bridging the deep-rooted biases through sustained reconditioning: It is only possible by promoting the idea of gender equality and uprooting social ideology of male child preferability.
  • They should be given decision-making powers and due position in governance. Thus, the Women Reservation Bill should be passed as soon as possible to increase the effective participation of women in the politics of India.
  • Bridging implementation gaps: Government or community-based bodies must be set up to monitor the programs devised for the welfare of the society.
  • Dalit women need group and gender specific policies and programmes to address the issue of multiple deprivations.
  • Dalit women require comprehensive policies on health, especially on the maternal and child health
  • Make credit available by pooling the women to form self-help groups. The example of Kudumbashree model of Kerala can be emulated.

 

Conclusion

Stringent laws alone have never helped its cause and attitudinal change in perception toward the Dalits and for Dalit toward themselves need to changed through active interventions which is well possible within the existing framework .

 

 


General Studies – 2


 

Topic: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

2. The multi-sectoral collaborations to achieve a reduction in suicide mortality in the country as proposed in the National Suicide Prevention Strategy is a much-needed step. Elaborate. (250 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: The Hindu

Why the question:

The Ministry of Health and Family Welfare on Monday announced a National Suicide Prevention Strategy, the first of its kind in the country, with time-bound action plans and multi-sectoral collaborations to achieve reduction in suicide mortality by 10% by 2030.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the features of the National Suicide Prevention Strategy and its role in preventing suicide.

Directive word: 

Elaborate – Give a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the context. You must be defining key terms wherever appropriate and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by giving context of the launch of National Suicide Prevention Strategy and its objectives.

Body:

In brief, write about the major features proposed by the National Suicide Prevention Strategy in order to prevent loss of life due to suicides.

Next, write about the ways the above will help in achieve reduction in suicide mortality.

Next, write about the shortcomings of the above policy and steps that are needed to make it more robust.

Conclusion:

Conclude with a way forward. 

Introduction

Recently, the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India has announced the “National Suicide Prevention Strategy”. It is the first of its kind in the country, with time-bound action plans and multi-sectoral collaborations to achieve reduction in suicide mortality by 10% by 2030. The strategy is in line with the World Health Organisation’s South East-Asia Region Strategy for suicide prevention.

 

Body

Statistics

  • India has the highest suicide rate in the Southeast Asian region.
  • A total of 1,34,516 cases of suicide were reported in 2018 in India, according to the National Crime Records Bureau.
  • While the rate of suicide was 9.9 in 2017, it increased to 10.2 in 2018.

 

National Suicide Prevention Strategy

  • The strategy broadly seeks to establish effective surveillance mechanisms for suicide within the next three years.
  • It seeks to establish psychiatric outpatient departments that will provide suicide prevention services through the District Mental Health Programme in all districts within the next five years.
  • It also aims to integrate a mental well-being curriculum in all educational institutions within the next eight years.
  • It envisages developing guidelines for responsible media reporting of suicides, and restricting access to means of suicide.

Measures taken by Government of India

  • Mental Healthcare Act, 2017:
    • MHA 2017 aims to provide mental healthcare services for persons with mental illness.
  • Kiran:
    • The Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment has launched a 24/7 toll-free helpline “KIRAN” to provide support to people facing anxiety, stress, depression, suicidal thoughts and other mental health concerns.
  • Manodarpan Initiative:
    • Manodarpan is an initiative of the Ministry of Education under Atmanirbhar Bharat Abhiyan. It is aimed to provide psychosocial support to students, family members and teachers for their mental health and well-being during the times of Covid-19.
  • Decriminalisation: Section 309 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) states whoever attempts to commit suicide and does any act towards the commission of such offence, shall be punished with simple imprisonment for a term which may extend to one year or with fine or both.
    • Section 115 (1) of the Mental Healthcare Act 2017 of the Act provides, “Notwithstanding anything contained in section 309 of the IPC, any person who attempts to commit suicide shall be presumed, unless proved otherwise, to have severe stress and shall not be tried and punished under the said Code.
    • However, this law applies only to those suffering from mental illness. There is presumption of severe stress in case of an attempt to die by suicide.

Conclusion and way forward

  • Limiting access to the means of suicide, such as highly hazardous pesticides and firearms.
  • Educating the media on responsible reporting of suicide.
  • Fostering socio-emotional life skills in adolescents.
  • Early identification, assessment, management and follow-up of anyone affected by suicidal thoughts and behaviour.
  • These needed to go hand-in-hand with foundational pillars like situation analysis, multi-sectoral collaboration, awareness raising capacity building, financing, surveillance and monitoring and evaluation.

 

 


General Studies – 3


 

Topic: Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment.

3. What are Biological Diversity Heritage Sites? Examine their role in preventing loss of biodiversity and to preserve the cultural and architectural heritage of the country. (250 words)

Difficulty level: Moderate

Reference: The Hindumegbiodiversity.nic.in

Why the question:

The Tamil Nadu Government on Tuesday, issued a notification declaring Arittapatti in Melur block, Madurai district, a biodiversity heritage site. The site spans a total area of 193.21 hectares

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the Biological Diversity Heritage Sites, its role in protecting biodiversity and heritage.

Directive:

Examine – When asked to ‘Examine’, we must investigate the topic (content words) in detail, inspect it, investigate it and establish the key facts and issues related to the topic in question. While doing so we should explain why these facts and issues are important and their implications.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by defining Biological Diversity Heritage Sites.

Body:

Frist, write about the important aspects of biodiversity and heritage they seek to protect – rare, endemic and threatened species, keystone species, species of evolutionary significance and areas with historical significance.

Next, write about their successes and limitation in protecting the biodiversity heritage of the country.

Conclusion:

Conclude by writing a way forward to over their limitations.

Introduction

Recently, the Tamil Nadu Government issued a notification declaring Arittapatti in Melur block, Madurai district, a Biodiversity Heritage Site (BHS). It is Tamil Nadu’s first and India’s 35th Biodiversity Heritage Site.

Biodiversity heritage sites are well-defined areas that are unique, ecologically fragile ecosystems with high diversity of wild and domesticated species, presence of rare and threatened species, and keystone species.

 

Body

About Bio diversity Heritage Sites

  • Laws related to biodiversity heritage sites: As per provision under Section 37(1) of ‘Biological Diversity Act, 2002’, The State Government may, from time to time in consultation with the local bodies, notify in the Official Gazette, areas of biodiversity importance as under this Act.
  • Restrictions: Creation of BHS may not put any restriction on the prevailing practices and usages of the local communities, other than those voluntarily decided by them. The purpose is to enhance the quality of life of the local communities through conservation measures.
  • First BHS of India: Nallur Tamarind Grove in Bengaluru, Karnataka was the first Biodiversity Heritage Site of India, declared in 2007.
  • Last Five Additions to BHS:
    • Debbari or Chabimura in Tripura (September 2022)
    • Betlingshib & its surroundings in Tripura (September 2022)
    • Hajong Tortoise Lake in Assam (August 2022)
    • Borjuli Wild Rice Site in Assam (August 2022)
    • Amarkantak in Madhya Pradesh (July 2022)

Role in preventing loss of biodiversity and preservation of cultural heritage

  • Biodiversity is closely linked to ecological security. Loss of biodiversity and bioresources show an increasing trend mainly due to human activities.
    • Therefore, it is necessary to instil and nurture conservation ethics in the community.
  • Fortunately, the local communities in Meghalaya have been traditionally displaying a remarkable degree of conservation ethics and values in the sphere of natural resources management.
  • Declaration of Biodiversity Heritage Sites is a welcome step which will exhibit the conservation ethics and values practiced by these societies to the wider world.
  • Such declaration will help them renew their commitment to conservation besides acting as a model for other communities to follow.
  • This is a small but important step that a community can take towards protecting the environment and ensuring sustainability of bio-resources across generations.
  • BHS declaration marks the voluntary participation of communities in protection and conservation of biodiversity which helps in expanding the reach of conservation

Conclusion

It is important to protect, nurture and improve the biodiversity heritage sites and restore them to ensure that future generations benefit from this small step towards environmental protection.

Value Addition

Criteria for declaration of Biodiversity Heritage Sites

  • Areas having any of the following characteristics, may qualify for inclusion as BHS. • Areas that contain a mosaic of natural, semi-natural, and manmade habitats, which together contain a significant diversity of life forms.
  • Areas that contain significant domesticated biodiversity component and/or representative agro-ecosystems with on-going agricultural practices that sustain this diversity.
  • Areas that are significant from a biodiversity point of view as also important cultural spaces such as sacred groves/trees and sites, or other large community conserved areas.
  • Areas including very small ones that offer refuge or corridors for threatened and endemic fauna and flora, such as community conserved areas or urban greens and wetlands.
  • Areas that provide habitats, aquatic or terrestrial, for seasonal migrant species for feeding and breeding.
  • Areas that are maintained as preservation plots by the research wing of Forest department. • Medicinal Plant Conservation Areas.

 

Topic: Challenges to internal security through communication networks, role of media and social networking sites in internal security challenges

4. Rumours spread through fake news can create a lot of social turmoil in a country and pose a risk to national security. Analyse. (250 words)

Difficulty level: Easy

Reference: Insights on India

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 3 and mentioned as part of Mission-2023 Secure timetable.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the threats posed by disinformation and ways to tackle it.

Directive:

Analyse – When asked to analyse, you must examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them in a summary.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by giving the context of spread of misinformation in the digital age.

Body:

First, write about the various political, economic and social consequences of the spread of misinformation and fake news. Substantiate with examples.

Next, write about how the above can compromise national security.

Next, write about the measures that are needed to tackle the above.

Conclusion:

Conclude by writing a way forward.

Introduction

The world has been battling a deluge of misinformation and influence operations for a long time now. The advent of internet, social media platforms and real time messengers has given a free run to criminals, miscreants, nation states and other motivated actors. In fact, society, today is experiencing something called an ‘information disorder’ where it has become extremely difficult to disambiguate truth from falsehood.

Body

Consequences of spreading fake news

  • Fake news with malicious intent : Manipulation through the social media allegedly spurred the mass exodus of north east Indians in Bangalore in 2012.
  • Spread hatred and mistrust: False information propagated through fake news have helped people developing racist and xenophobic sentiments against people of Asian origin around the world, as we saw in the case of Corona epidemic. Such messages can often be a means of reinforcing existing prejudices.
  • Fake news is created to deliberately misinform or deceive readers. Usually, these stories are created to either influence people’s views, push a political agenda or cause confusion and can often be a profitable business for online publishers. Ex: Muzaffarnagar riots of 2013: fake video fuelled communal passions.
  • Social media has led to a dislocation of politics with people weighing in on abstractions online while being disengaged from their immediate surroundings.
    • Social media has led to a degradation of our political discourse where serious engagement has been supplanted by “hot takes” and memes.
    • It has obscured the providence of consequential interventions in our political discourse because of opacity in technology.
  • Misinformation and disinformation spread in media is becoming a serious social challenge. It is leading to the poisonous atmosphere on the web and causing riots and lynching on the road.
  • Platforms for harmful conspiracy theories and hate speech
    • Spread of false or discredited science – e.g. anti-vax movement
  • In the age of the internet (WhatsApp, Facebook, Twitter,) it is a serious problem as rumours, morphed images, click-baits, motivated stories, unverified information, planted stories for various interests spread easily among 35 crore internet users in India.
  • Violence :There have been many instances of online rumours leading to killings of innocent people. In some cases, ministers have deleted tweets after realizing the fake news which they shared earlier.
  • Fake news has also been used to deceive illiterate people financially. Example- Chit fund schemes introduced the concept of online fraud through spam emails.
  • Fake news has reduced people’s belief in social, print and electronic media = affect the benefits of these media.

Measures needed to curb fake news

  • The current response to fake news primarily revolves around three prongs— rebuttal, removal of the fake news item and educating the public.
    • Rebuttal:It is a form of fact-checking wherein the fake news is debunked by pointing out errors like mismatch, malicious editing and misattribution.
    • Removal of Fake news:Technical companies like Facebook and YouTube uses algorithms to proactively remove fake news from their platforms.
    • Also, WhatsApp has put a limit on forwarding messages, so as to limit the spread to fake news.
  • Education and Awareness: The government must take the initiative to make all sections of the population aware of the realities of this information war and evolve a consensus to fight this war. Itmust also take strict action against the fake news providers.
    • Ex: Italy has experimentally added ‘recognizing fake news’ in school syllabus. India should also seriously emphasize cybersecurity, internet education, fake news education in the academic curriculum at all levels.
  • Strict Regulation: News being spread using chatbots and other automated pieces of software should automatically be selected for special screening.
  • Bring out policy-: The government should bring out a draft seeking opinion from stakeholders regarding issues of controlling fake news.Any future guidelines on ‘fake news’ should target ‘fake news’ and not try to regulate media in the name of ‘fake news’.
  • Regulatory mechanism:The PCI needs to be reformed and empowered in a way so as to enable it tostrike a balance between the freedom of media and speech on the one hand, and right to know on the other.
  • Government should have independent agency: to verify the data being circulated in social and other media. The agency should be tasked with presenting real facts and figures.
  • An ombudsman Institution:To receive complaints on fake news and initiate immediate action.
  • Accountability of Social Media:Social media websites should be made accountable of such activities so that it becomes their responsibility to have better control over the spread of fake news.
  • Using Artificial Intelligence: The artificial intelligence technologies, particularly machine learning and natural language processing, might be leveraged to combat the fake news problem. AI technologies hold promise for significantly automating parts of the procedure human fact checkers use today to determine if a story is real or a hoax.

 Conclusion

Fake news affects free speech and informed choices of citizens of the country, leading to the hijacking of democracy. Hence it is extremely important that there is a collective effort from all the stake holders involved to tackle this menace comprehensively.

Value addition

Laws and Regulation to Curb Fake News in India:

  • Press Council of India:It is a regulatory body which can warn, admonish or censure the newspaper, the news agency, the editor or the journalist or disapprove the conduct of the editor or the journalist if it finds that a newspaper or a news agency has violated journalistic ethics.
  • News Broadcasters Association:It represents the private television news and current affairs broadcasters. The self-regulatory body probes complaints against electronic media.
  • Indian Broadcast Foundation:It looks into the complaints against contents aired by channels.
  • Broadcasting Content Complaint Council: It admits complaints against TV broadcasters for objectionable TV content and fake news.
  • Indian Penal Code:Section 153 (wantonly giving provocation with intent to cause riot) and Section 295 (injuring or defiling a place of worship with intent to insult the religion of any class) can be invoked to guard against fake news.
  • Information Technology Act 2000: According to the Section 66 of the act, if any person, dishonestly or fraudulently, does any act referred to in Section 43 (damage to computer, computer system), shall be punishable with imprisonment for a term which may extend to three years or with fine which may extend to five lakh rupees or with both.
  • Civil or Criminal Case for Defamation:It is another resort against fake news for individuals and groups hurt by the fake news. IPC Section 499 (defamation) and Section 500 (whoever defames another shall be punished with simple imprisonment for a term which may extend to two years, or with fine, or with both) provide for a defamation suit.
  • Fake news has existed since the dawn of the printing press but in the age of the internet and social media, it has found a tremendous application.Manipulation of algorithms of social media and search engines is a global trend now.
  • Misinformation and disinformation spread in the media is becoming a serious social challenge.It is leading to the poisonous atmosphere on the web and causing riots and lynching on the road.

 

Topic: Linkages between development and spread of extremism.

5. Do you think that the Border Security Force (BSF) is well equipped to deal with illegal migration and cross-border crimes? State your opinion. (250 words)

Difficulty level: Tough

Reference: Insights on India

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 3 and mentioned as part of Mission-2023 Secure timetable.

Key Demand of the question:

To write about the efficacy of BSF in dealing with illegal migration and cross-border crimes.

Directive word: 

Analyse – When asked to analyse, you must examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them in a summary.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by mentioning the objectives of BSF.

Body:

First, give a profile of BSF deployment across India’s borders and their responsibilities.

Next, write about the successes and limitations of BSF in dealing with major security issues such as – illegal migration, trafficking in person and narcotics as well as smuggling in fake Indian currency notes. Cite examples and facts.

Next, write about the measures that are needed to enhance the capacity of the BSF.

Conclusion:

Conclude by writing a way forward.

Introduction

The Border Security Force (BSF) is India’s principal border guarding force, entrusted with securing the country’s international borders with Pakistan and Bangladesh. Until 1965, India’s borders with Pakistan were patrolled by police personnel from Indian states that bordered Pakistan. The committee of secretaries established in the aftermath of the 1965 Indo-Pak War suggested the creation of a specialised centrally controlled Border Security Force that would be equipped and trained to patrol the International Border with Pakistan. As a result, on December 1, 1965, the Border Security Force (BSF) was established.

Body

Background

The BSF was raised in 1965, after the India-Pakistan war. It is one of the seven Central Armed Police Forces of the Union of India under the administrative control of the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA). The 2.65-lakh force is deployed along the Pakistan and Bangladesh borders. It is deployed on Indo-Pakistan International Border, Indo-Bangladesh International Border, Line of Control (LoC) along with Indian Army and in Anti-Naxal Operations.

Role of the BSF

  • The role of the BSF is distinct during times of peace and war.
  • During peacetime, its duties include:
    • Preventing cross-border crimes and unlawful entry into or exit from the territory of India.
    • Preventing any illegal activities like smuggling across the borders.
    • Encourage a feeling of security among the people residing in the border areas.
    • To help state and union territory administration in the maintenance of law and order and with anti-insurgency operations.
  • During wartime, its duties include:
    • Defending important installations of the country, particularly airfields, from enemy commandos, paratroopers, or raids, in less-threatened sectors as long as the situation is within the BSF’s competence.
    • Keeping prisoners of war safe. Maintaining law and order in enemy areas under Army control, taking limited aggressive action against enemy irregular elements or paramilitary formations if necessary.

 

Significance and function of Border Security Force

  • BSF has been defending Sir Creek in Arabian Sea and Sundarban delta in the Bay of Bengal with its state of art fleet of Water Crafts.
  • BSF has an instrumental role in helping state administration in maintaining Law and Order and conducting peaceful elections.
  • BSF has been crusading against natural calamity to save precious human lives as and when warranted.
  • It contributes dedicated services to the UN peacekeeping Mission by sending a large contingent of its trained manpower every year.
  • It has been termed as the First Line of Defence of Indian Territories.
  • BSF and internal security duties: While border protection has been the primary duty of BSF, it has also been deployed for counter-terrorism and counter-insurgency operations in troubled areas of the country like J&K, NE states and naxal-hit areas.
    • These forces have also been utilised for tasks like conducting elections peacefully, VIP security, riot, and crowd control.
  • BSF and disaster management: BSF also plays an important role in disaster management. Some of the battalions of BSF trained in disaster management activities were part of the National Disaster Response force. For example, during the Gujarat earthquake in 2001, BSF was the first to reach out to help the distressed people.

 

Conclusion

During the Kargil conflict in 1999, the BSF remained on the heights of the mountains and defended the integrity of the country with all the might at its command in unison with the Army. Thus, with a wide set of responsibilities and variety of roles under its belt, BSF helps in maintaining the integrity and security of India.

 

 


General Studies – 4


 

Topic: Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators;

6. What does this quote means to you? (150 words)

“It is our moral failure that we still tolerate poverty” – Ela Bhatt

Difficulty level: Moderate

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 4 and part of ‘Quotes Wednesdays’ in Mission-2023 Secure.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by explaining the literal meaning of the quote.

Body:

Write about how prevalence and tolerance of poverty is moral failure of the society and why it displays a lack of compassion and altruism. Mention the values that must be promoted to end poverty.

Conclusion:

Summarise by highlighting the importance of the quote in the present day.

Introduction

It’s bad reasoning, not human nature, that blinds us to the predicament of the poor. If poverty is intolerable, it is not just because serious deprivation makes our lives precarious and dreadful, but also because extreme poverty can rob us of the normal human feelings that we tend to have. Given the nastiness of extreme deprivation, and the wealth of the world, there is some difficulty in explaining how poverty is an accepted predicament of so many people across the world.

Body

While the incidence of poverty varies from country to country, there is no country that is free from it: the question of why we tolerate the intolerable has relevance for every country in the world.

Blaming the victim is as common today as it was in the days when very mild attempts at poverty relief, such as the English Poor Laws, had their staunch opponents. It is not, however, easy to see how the army of the unemployed and the destitute can readily reverse their own predicament, without extensive social and economic change.

Human beings are basically self-centered creatures who do not worry about others. Going further, some argue that there is, in fact, no compelling reason why others should have any moral obligation to help remove deprivation unless they are themselves responsible for the condition of the deprived.

To conclude, it is hard to believe that the quiet tolerance of poverty and deprivation really arises from some basic inability of people to sympathise with each other. We get more help from the hypothesis of ignorance—not arising from the unavailability of empirical information, but from established barriers against paying attention to information about socially distanced people. In the case of India, it is almost certainly linked to hardened social stratifications of caste, class and gender and to the biases that these barriers impose on the coverage of the otherwise vibrant Indian media. The nature of that media, however, is not an immutable social fact, and a clear recognition of the need for change can itself be an important step towards remedying the limited nature of the coverage. The fact that the experience of the world—from Europe to east Asia—shows a positive connection between economic expansion, on the one hand, and public efforts to enhance human capability, on the other, has to be much more widely discussed and far better appreciated.

 

Conclusion

If it seems possible that the tolerance of the intolerable arises ultimately from fallacious reasoning, rather than from the unsympathetic nature of human beings, that recognition must surely provide some ground for relief. It also generates the understanding that there is work to be done.

 

 

Topic: Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators;

7. What does this quote means to you? (150 words)

“One’s life has value so long as one attributes value to the life of others.” ― Simone de Beauvoir

Difficulty level: Easy

Why the question:

The question is part of the static syllabus of General studies paper – 4 and part of ‘Quotes Wednesdays’ in Mission-2023 Secure.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin by explaining the literal meaning of the quote.

Body:

Write about how one can generate value in his/her life by creating or generating value in others life or contribution to the happiness of others. Cite examples to substantiate wherein people to served others added value to their own life.

Conclusion:

Summarise by highlighting the importance of the quote in the present day.

Introduction

“One’s life has value so long as one attributes value to the life of others, by means of love, friendship, indignation and compassion.”

You will be remembered more for your kindness, love, compassion than any level of success you could possibly attain. Mother Teresa was known for kindness, love, compassion and upliftment of the poor and downtrodden.

Body

You may think you’re just doing a job, but the people around you notice who you are. They will remember your kindness. All too often, it can seem that history books are packed with marauding royals, dishonest politicians, warring nations and murderous plots. However, history is also full of examples of kind and good gestures.

Our life becomes meaningful because of our bonds with other fellow human beings. These bonds are made of love friendship and compassion. For instance, a child has no need for the mother’s wealth but for the love and care. Your true friends don’t ask you if you are wealthy to be friends with you, rather they stand by you during your tough times.

All our great leaders like Mahatma Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, were greatest souls that walked the earth simply because of the personalities they were and the work they did. Their clothes or how they looked didn’t matter. The impact they had on the lives of people is the only reason they are immortal. They liberated billions of people during their time and brought in social revolution.

Conclusion

When recalling people who are memorable in our own lives, they are not always people who we believed to be the smartest or most credentialed, but often those who made us feel the most comfortable, and who were most interested in us. Authentic interest is uniquely attractive. Not only will you remember what someone said, but they will also remember you.


Join our Official Telegram Channel HERE

Please subscribe to Our podcast channel HERE

Subscribe to our YouTube ChannelHERE

Follow our Twitter Account HERE

Follow our Instagram ID HERE