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[Mission 2022] INSIGHTS DAILY CURRENT AFFAIRS + PIB SUMMARY- 10 December 2021

 

InstaLinks help you think beyond the issue but relevant to the issue from UPSC prelims and Mains exam point of view. These linkages provided in this ‘hint’ format help you frame possible questions in your mind that might arise(or an examiner might imagine) from each current event. InstaLinks also connect every issue to their static or theoretical background. This helps you study a topic holistically and add new dimensions to every current event to help you think analytically.

 

current affairs, current events, current gk, insights ias current affairs, upsc ias current affairs

Table of Contents:

GS Paper 1:

1. 75 yrs of Constituent Assembly’s 1st sitting.

2. More Cyclones in Arabian Sea.

 

GS Paper 2:

1. Bills to Extend tenure of ED and CBI Chiefs.

2. Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019.

3. Bird flu.

4. World Gold Council.

 

Facts for Prelims:

1. New Zealand’s lifetime ban.

2. Jnanpith Award.


75 yrs of Constituent Assembly’s 1st sitting:

GS Paper 1:

Topics Covered: Modern history and important events.

 

Context:

The Constituent Assembly of India had held its first meeting 75 years ago on December 9, 1946.

  • Distinguished people from different parts of India, different backgrounds and even differing ideologies came together with one aim- to give the people of India a worthy Constitution.

current affairs

 

What do you need to know about the Constituent Assembly of India?

  1. The idea of a constituent assembly was put forward for the first time by MN Roy.
  2. In 1935, the Indian National Congress (INC), for the first time, officially called for a constituent assembly to frame a constitution for India.
  3. In 1938, J Nehru made this emphatic statement regarding the constitution- ‘The constitution of free India must be framed, without outside interference, by a constituent assembly elected on the basis of adult franchise’
  4. The demand for a constituent assembly was accepted for the first time by the British through their ‘August offer’ of 1940.
  5. Eventually, a constituent assembly was established under the provisions of the Cabinet Mission plan.
  6. It was constituted in 1946.

 

Some of the important aspects related to this are:

  • Total strength of the assembly: 389.
  • 296 seats for British India and 93 seats to princely states.
  • 292 seats allocated for British India were to be from eleven governor’s provinces and four from Chief commissioner’s provinces.
  • Seats were allocated based on proportion to their respective population.
  • Seats allocated to each British province were to be decided among the three principal communities- Muslims, Sikhs and general.
  • Representatives of each communities were to be elected by members of that community in the provincial legislative assembly and voting was to be by the method of proportional representation by means of single transferrable vote.
  • Representatives of princely states were to be nominated by head of these princely states.

 

Some observations regarding the composition:

  • Partly elected and partly nominated.
  • Indirect election by provincial assemblies who themselves were elected on a limited franchise.
  • Though an indirect mode of election, it included representatives from all sections of the society.
  • Muslim league did not participate in the first meeting.
  • Constituent assembly held 11 sessions over two years, 11 months and 18 days.
  • Last session of the constituent assembly was held on January 24, 1950.

 

Constituent assembly acted as the temporary legislature until a new one was to be constituted. Some of the functions it performed at this stage were:

  1. Ratification of India’s membership of the commonwealth.
  2. It adopted the national flag.
  3. It adopted the national anthem.
  4. Adoption of National song.
  5. Electing Dr Rajendra Prasad as the first President of India.

 

Criticism of the constituent assembly:

  1. Not a representative body since members were not directly elected.
  2. It was not a sovereign body since it was established based on British order.
  3. It consumed unduly long time to make the constitution.
  4. It was dominated predominantly by congress party.
  5. It was dominated by lawyer-politician to a greater degree.
  6. It was dominated by Hindus predominantly.

 

Insta Curious:

Did you know that the first constituent assembly sitting was presided by Sachchidananda Sinha, the “temporary chairman” of the assembly? Sinha was then the oldest parliamentarian in India and had even served as a member of the Imperial Legislative Council from 1910 to 1920.

 

InstaLinks:

Prelims Link:

  1. About the Constituent Assembly.
  2. Establishment.
  3. Functions.
  4. Committees.
  5. Objective Resolution.

Mains Link:

To what extent can it be said the constituent assembly was a one party body? Critically Examine.

Sources: Indian Express.

More Cyclones in Arabian Sea:

GS Paper 1:

Topics Covered: Important Geophysical phenomena such as earthquakes, Tsunami, Volcanic activity, cyclone etc.

 

Context:

An analysis of past data of cyclones over North Indian Ocean (Bay of Bengal and Arabian Sea) during the period from 1891 to 2020 indicates that:

  • The frequency of “very severe cyclonic storms” has increased in recent years over the Arabian Sea. However, this has not measurably increased the threat to India’s western coast, as most of these cyclones were making landfall in Oman and Yemen.
  • The Eastern Coast remained far more vulnerable to “Extremely Severe Cyclones” than the Western coast, but there was nevertheless “no significant trend” in the frequency of Extremely Severe Cyclonic Storms (ESCS).
  • The number of deaths due to cyclones has decreased significantly, as a result of the improvement in the early warning skill of the India Meteorological Department (IMD) under the Ministry of Earth Sciences (MoES).
  • The effective mitigation measures and response actions by the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) and Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) have also improved.

 

Factors responsible for this:

  1. Surface temperatures in the Arabian Sea have increased rapidly during the past century due to global warming. Temp. Now is 1.2–1.4 °C higher than the temperature witnessed four decades ago. These warmer temperatures support active convection, heavy rainfall, and intense cyclones.
  2. The rising temperature is also enabling the Arabian Sea to supply ample energy for the intensification of cyclones.
  3. The Arabian Sea is also providing conducive wind shear for cyclones. For instance, a higher level easterly wind drove the depression of Cyclone Ockhi from the Bay of Bengal to the Arabian Sea.

 

Naming of Cyclones:

Know how Cyclones are named here.

 

Insta Curious:

Do you know the differences between Supercell and Mesocylone? Reference.

 

Did you know that a very severe cyclone is defined as one with wind speeds touching 220 kmph? It is the fourth highest category of cyclones, just below “Extremely Severe Cyclones”.

 

InstaLinks:

Prelims Link:

  1. Factors responsible for the genesis of cyclones.
  2. Naming of cyclones in various regions of the world.
  3. Why are there more cyclones in Eastern coast of India?
  4. What is coriolis force?
  5. What is the latent heat of condensation?

Mains Link:

Discuss the factors responsible for the formation of tropical cyclones.

Sources: the Hindu.

Bills to Extend tenure of ED and CBI Chiefs:

GS Paper 2:

Topics Covered: Government Policies and issues associated.

 

Context:

Amid strong objection from the Opposition, the Lok Sabha has passed two Bills allowing the Centre to extend the tenure of the Enforcement Directorate (ED) chief and the CBI Director up to five years from the current fixed tenure of two years.

  • The Bills replace the ordinances brought in last month.

 

About the Ordinances:

The Union Government has brought in two ordinances allowing the service of the directors of the Enforcement Directorate (ED) and the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) to be extended beyond their fixed tenure of at least two years up to a maximum of five years.

  • The extension can be given only one year at a time. That is, after a fixed two-year tenure, they may get three annual extensions.

 

Laws amended:

  1. The change in tenure of the CBI Director was done by amending the Delhi Special Police Establishment Act, 1946.
  2. On the other hand, the changes to the tenure of the ED Director was brought in by amending the Central Vigilance Commission Act, 2003.

 

Plea in Supreme Court on new Ordinances:

Petitions have been filed in the Supreme Court urging the Supreme Court to quash the Ordinances, which allow the Government to extend the tenures of the chiefs of the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) and Enforcement Directorate (ED) “in a piecemeal fashion” up to a maximum of five years.

 

Issues:

  • The petitioners said the Ordinances would leave the heads of the two top investigative bodies insecure about their tenure and erode their professional independence.
  • Also, no criteria has been provided save for a vague reference to ‘public interest’ which is based on the subjective satisfaction of the Respondents.
  • The Government’s move has also drawn sharp criticism from the Opposition parties, which have accused it of taking the ordinance route despite the Parliament session beginning on November 29.

 

On what grounds have these ordinances been challenged?

About a year ago, the ED Director had been given a one-year extension retrospectively following the completion of a two-year fixed tenure. The move was challenged before the Supreme Court, which upheld the government’s decision. However, it said that such a drastic measure should be taken only rarely.

  • The petitioners, who allege that the two ordinances are arbitrary and unconstitutional, cite the judgment, as well as the Apex Court verdict in Vineet Narain vs Union of India (1997) which held that the CBI and the ED chiefs should have a minimum tenure of two years.

 

Insta Curious:

Details of the Supreme Court verdict in Prakash Singh case and further orders: read here.

 

InstaLinks:

Prelims Link:

  1. About CBI and its establishment.
  2. Provisions of DSPE Act.
  3. What is General Consent?
  4. What happens when general consent is withdrawn by states?
  5. About ED.

Mains Link:

Can withdrawal mean that the CBI can no longer probe any case? Discuss.

Sources: the Hindu.

Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019:

GS Paper 2:

Topics Covered: Parliament and State Legislatures – structure, functioning, conduct of business, powers & privileges and issues arising out of these.

 

Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019:

Context:

Two years after the Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019 (CAA) was passed by Parliament, the Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) is yet to notify the rules governing the Act. The legislation cannot be implemented without the rules being notified.

 

Background:

The Citizenship (Amendment) Act, 2019 (CAA) was notified on December 12, 2019 and came into force from January 10, 2020.

It seeks to amend the Citizenship Act, 1955.

  • The Citizenship Act,1955 provides various ways in which citizenship may be acquired.
  • It provides for citizenship by birth, descent, registration, naturalisation and by incorporation of the territory into India.

 

About CAA:

  • The objective of the CAA is to grant Indian citizenship to persecuted minorities — Hindu, Sikh, Jain, Buddhist, Parsi and Christian — from Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan.
  • Those from these communities who had come to India till December 31, 2014, facing religious persecution in their respective countries, will not be treated as illegal immigrants but given Indian citizenship.
  • The Act provides that the central government may cancel the registration of OCIs on certain grounds.

 

Exceptions:

  • The Act does not apply to tribal areas of Tripura, Mizoram, Assam and Meghalaya because of being included in the 6th Schedule of the Constitution.
  • Also areas that fall under the Inner Limit notified under the Bengal Eastern Frontier Regulation, 1873, will also be outside the Act’s purview.

 

Issues surrounding the law:

  • It violates the basic tenets of the Constitution. Illegal immigrants are distinguished on the basis of religion.
  • It is perceived to be a demographic threat to indigenous communities.
  • It makes illegal migrants eligible for citizenship on the basis of religion. This may violate Article 14 of the Constitution which guarantees the right to equality.
  • It attempts to naturalise the citizenship of illegal immigrants in the region.
  • It allows cancellation of OCI registration for violation of any law. This is a wide ground that may cover a range of violations, including minor offences.

 

Opposition to the law:

  • The constitutional and legal validity of the CAA has been challenged in the Hon’ble Supreme Court of India’. The Governments of Rajathan and Kerala have filed petitions under Article 131 (the Supreme Court shall, to the exclusion of any other court, have original jurisdiction in any dispute between the Government of India and one or more States).
  • The Central Government has received resolutions adopted by the Assemblies of Meghalaya, West Bengal, Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Punjab against the Act.

 

Insta Curious:

How NRC is different from CAA? Are there any similarities between the two? Reference:

 

InstaLinks:

Prelims Link:

  1. About CAA.
  2. Features.
  3. Religions covered.
  4. Countries Covered.
  5. Exceptions.

Mains Link:

Discuss the issues surrounding the implementation of CAA.

Sources: the Hindu.

Bird Flu: 

GS Paper 2:

Topics Covered: Issues related to Health.

 

Context:

Fresh cases of bird flu have been confirmed in the Kuttanad region of Kerala. Response teams have been formed for culling birds in affected areas.

 

What is bird flu?

  • Also called avian influenza.
  • It is a disease caused by avian influenza Type A viruses found naturally in wild birds worldwide.
  • Symptoms have ranged from mild to severe influenza-like illness.

current affairs

 

Classification:

Avian Influenza type A viruses are classified based on two proteins on their surfaces – Hemagglutinin(HA) and Neuraminidase(NA).

  • There are about 18 HA subtypes and 11 NA subtypes.
  • Several combinations of these two proteins are possible e.g., H5N1, H7N2, H9N6, H17N10, etc.

 

Spread:

  • There have been reports of avian and swine influenza infections in humans.
  • The infection is deadly as it has a high mortality rate of about 60%.
  • The most common route of virus transmission is direct contact. They can also be affected if they come in contact with contaminated surfaces or air near the infected poultry.

 

Can the virus transfer to humans?

There are no known cases of H5N8 in human beings. Risk to general public is very low. There is also no evidence that consumption of poultry meat or eggs could transmit the virus to humans. But necessary precautions are required while handling sick/dead birds and contaminated material during control and containment operations. It is considered safe to eat properly cooked poultry products.

 

Control measures:

Culling is usually undertaken to control the infection when it is detected in animals. Besides culling, safe disposal of all such culled animals and animal products is also important. The authorities also need to strictly enforce decontamination of infected premises and undertake quarantine of contaminated vehicles and personnel.

 

Insta Curious:

India was declared free from Avian Influenza (H5N1) in 2019. The status will last only till another outbreak is reported. Know when and how a country is declared free from Avian Influenza? Reference: 

 

InstaLinks:

Prelims Link:

  1. About Bird Flu.
  2. Transmission.
  3. Types.
  4. Symptoms.

Mains Link:

Discuss the impact of Bird Flu outbreak on Indian Economy.

Sources: the Hindu.

World Gold Council:

GS Paper 2:

Topics Covered: Important International institutions, agencies and fora, their structure, mandate.

 

World Gold Council:

Context:

As per WGC’s ‘Bullion Trade in India’ report:

  1. Imports made up 86% of India’s gold supply between 2016-2020, and inbound shipments continue to grow despite high import duty.
  2. Since the first duty hike in 2012, India has imported some 6,581 tonnes of gold, averaging 730 tonnes per annum.
  3. In 2020, India imported 377 tonnes of gold bars and dore from over 30 countries, of which 55% came from just two countries — Switzerland (44%) and the UAE (11%).
  4. In the last five years, gold dore imports made up 30% of the total official imports of the yellow metal.

 

 

Gold & Economy:

As Currency: Gold was used as the world reserve currency up through most of the 20th century. The United States used the gold standard until 1971.

As a hedge against inflation: The demand for gold increases during inflationary times due to its inherent value and limited supply. As it cannot be diluted, gold is able to retain value much better than other forms of currency.

Strength of Currency: When a country imports more than it exports, the value of its currency will decline. On the other hand, the value of its currency will increase when a country is a net exporter. Thus, a country that exports gold or has access to gold reserves will see an increase in the strength of its currency when gold prices increase, since this increases the value of the country’s total exports.

Current affairs

 

About the World Gold Council:

  • It is the market development organisation for the gold industry.
  • It works across all parts of the industry, from gold mining to investment, and their aim is to stimulate and sustain demand for gold.
  • It is an association whose members comprise the world’s leading gold mining companies.
  • It helps to support its members to mine in a responsible way and developed the Conflict Free Gold Standard.
  • Headquartered in the UK, they have offices in India, China, Singapore, Japan and the United States.

Current affairs

 

InstaLinks:

Prelims Link:

  1. Gold imports and exports.
  2. About WGC.
  3. India’s gold consumption.
  4. Major gold producing sites in India.

 Mains Link:

Discuss how gold demand affects the overall economy of a country.

Sources: the Hindu.

Facts for Prelims:

 

New Zealand’s lifetime ban:

  • New Zealand has banned anyone aged 14 from buying cigarettes for life, one of the toughest approaches in the world to curbing smoking deaths as part of a wider plan that focuses on the disproportionate impact on its indigenous Maori population.
  • New Zealand is already one of 17 countries where plain cigarette packaging is compulsory.
  • It also bans sales to anyone under 18, but it says those measures are not enough to reach its goal of a national adult smoking rate of less than 5% by 2025

 

Jnanpith Award:

Assamese poet Nilmani Phookan Jr has won the 56th Jnanpith Award, and Konkani novelist Damodar Mauzo has won the 57th Jnanpith Award.

  • India’s highest literary award, the annual Jnanpith is bestowed on writers for “their outstanding contribution towards literature”.
  • English along with other Indian languages is considered for the Award.
  • The Award is open for only Indian citizens and is given annually.
  • The prize carries a cash award of Rs. 11 lakhs, a citation, and a bronze replica of Vagdevi (Saraswati), the goddess of learning.
  • It is sponsored by the cultural organization Bharatiya Jnanpith.

current Affairs


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