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SECURE SYNOPSIS: 16 April 2021


NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same time gives you extra points in the form of background information.


General Studies – 1


 

Topic: Salient features of Indian Society, Diversity of India.

1. India holds the appalling tag of being home to the largest number of underage brides and is committed to ending child marriage by 2030 under the UN sustainable development goals. In this context discuss the factors responsible and suggest solutions to address the issue of Child-marriage in India. (250 words)

Reference:  The Wire

Why the question:

The question is premised on the issue of child marriages in India.

Key Demand of the question:

Discuss the issue of child marriage in detail and explain what should be done to do away with the problems.

Directive:

Discuss – This is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with facts related to child marriage and the definition of it.

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

Explain first the underlying factors that lead to Child marriages in India; discuss the historical factors, societal reasons, Poverty, Insecurity, Political and financial reasons, Lack of education, Patriarchy and gender inequalities, Inadequate implementation of the law etc.

Then discuss the impact of it; Child marriage violates children’s rights and places them at high risk of violence, exploitation, and abuse. Child marriage affects both girls and boys, but it affects girls disproportionately.

Suggest solutions to address – Empower girls with information, skills and support networks. Provide economic support and incentives to girls and their families. Educate and rally parents and community members. Enhance girls’ access to a high-quality education. Encourage supportive laws and policies.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction

Recent analysis by UNICEF points out that one in three of the world’s child brides live in India. It has also warned India against the increase in child marriages owing to the adversaries of COVID-19.  To achieve the commitment of ending child marriages by 2030, it becomes important to integrate the COVID -19 responses with child marriage elimination efforts.

Body

Child marriage is an outcome of complex web of various socio-economic factors:

  • Poverty: girl child is mostly seen as liability in poor households.
  • Absence of quality schooling and higher education opportunities .
  • Limited economic opportunities to the women in house : this weakens their stand against child marriage.
  • Age old social customs and traditions and Patriarchal mindsets prevailing in the society encourages child marriage.
  • Disaster and conflict related unrest and instability

Though government of India has enacted Prohibition of Child Marriage Act, 2006 and POSCO act, practice of child marriage is very much prevalent all over India.  Further, practice of child marriage is having ripple effect in areas like teenage pregnancy, under nutrition, increased cases of anaemia, under development of children etc.

Steps to prevent the child marriage and associated issues:

  • Collaborative policing with frequent community outreach programs: Appointing informers to raise alarms and keeping the local police in loop to prevent cases of child marriage.
  • Awareness program: training local anganwadi staff, self help groups and Gram Vikas committees  to prevent the practice of child marriages .
    • Awareness session among the religious elders from all the religions. Saving Child Brides Campaign of Telangana can be taken as an example to implement such awareness campaigns.
  • Setting up of 24/7 helpline to address the distress calls
  • Create enabling opportunities with life skill and livelihood training
  • Greater retention of girls in the education system with measures like conditional cash transfers on school enrolment and attendance
  • Better access to information on reproductive health among parents and children.

Conclusion

Transformative and well resourced measures that increase access to education, health and overall girl’s empowerment will not just help in eliminating child marriage but also lead to the long term positive health and education outcomes thus help India reach its SDG targets by 2030.

 

 


General Studies – 2


 

Topic: Welfare schemes for vulnerable sections of the population by the Centre and States and the performance of these schemes; mechanisms, laws, institutions and Bodies constituted for the protection and betterment of these vulnerable sections.

2. To make amends for the excesses committed against the LGBTQ+ community in the past and present, the Indian state should enact a ‘Siras Act’ on the lines of the Alan Turing law. Elucidate.(250 words)

Reference:  The Hindu

Why the question:

The editorial presents a case for a law to accord an ex post facto pardon to those who were convicted under Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC).

Key Demand of the question:

Discuss the importance of enacting a ‘Siras Act’ on the lines of the Alan Turing law.

Directive:

Elucidate – Give a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with brief narration of Article 377.

Body:

Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code is a section of the Indian Penal Code introduced in 1861 during the British rule of India. It makes sexual activities “against the order of nature” illegal.

On 6 September 2018, the Supreme Court of India ruled that the application of Section 377 to consensual homosexual sex between adults was unconstitutional, “irrational, indefensible and manifestly arbitrary”, but that Section 377 remains in force relating to sex with minors, non-consensual sexual acts, and bestiality.

Then present an overview of judicial interventions.

Account for the arguments for pardon law.

Conclusion:

Conclude that to make amends for the excesses committed against the LGBTQ+ community in the past and present, the Indian state should enact a ‘Siras Act’ on the lines of the Alan Turing law.

Introduction

A law to accord an ex post facto pardon to those who were convicted under Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) would do poetic justice to the LGBTQ+ community and Professor Ramchandra Siras. What happened to Siras is a perfect example of the persecution faced by the LGBTQ+ community in India. This is just one example of persecution whereas thousands face atrocities even today in the LGBTQ community.

Body

Article 377

  • Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code 1860, a relic of British India, states that “whoever voluntarily has carnal intercourse against the order of nature with any man, woman or animal shall be punished.”
  • This included private consensual sex between adults of same sex.
  • After the recent SC judgement, provisions of Section 377 remain applicable in cases of non-consensual carnal intercourse with adults, all acts of carnal intercourse with minors, and acts of bestiality.
  • Many LGBTQ communities were tormented under the garb of this act

 

Background to decriminalisation of Article 377

  • The Delhi High Court’s verdict in Naz Foundation v. Govt. of NCT of Delhi (2009) resulted in the decriminalisation of homosexual acts involving consenting adults.
  • The Court held that Section 377 offended the guarantee of equality enshrined in Article 14 of the Constitution, because it creates an unreasonable classification and targets homosexuals as a class.
  • Justice A.P. Shah observed in the judgment that discrimination is the antithesis of equality and that it is the recognition of equality which will foster the dignity of every individual.
  • In a retrograde step, the Supreme Court, in Suresh Kumar Koushal vs. Naz Foundation (2013), reinstated Section 377 in the IPC.
  • Fortunately, India witnessed the resurrection of Naz Foundation through the apex court’s judgment in Navtej Singh Johar & Ors. v. Union of India (2018).

Need for enacting Siras Act

  • From Oscar Wilde to Alan Turing, many well-known as well as unknown people were haunted by anti-LGBTQ+ laws, and many jurisdictions repented later.
  • The U.K. passed the Alan Turing law in 2017, which grants amnesty and pardon to those convicted of consensual same-sex relationships.
  • The law is named after Alan Turing, the computer scientist who was instrumental in cracking intercepted coded messages during World War II and was convicted of gross indecency in 1952.
  • The Alan Turing law provides not only a posthumous pardon but also an automatic formal pardon for living people.
  • To make amends for the excesses committed against the LGBTQ+ community in the past and present, the Indian state should enact a ‘Siras Act’ on the lines of the Alan Turing law.
  • Ex post facto pardon may be a novel concept in India, but it would do justice, even though delayed, to the prisoners of sexual conscience and Siras.

Conclusion

The spirit of Navtej Singh Johar should be pushed further. India must progress and enact laws on marriage and such related civil rights for LGBTQ community. Normalisation is the key to empower the community that has been marginalised for centuries. New India at 75 also means that everyone gets same rights in the country and that should be the way forward.

 

Topic: Issues relating to development and management of Social Sector/Services relating to Health, Education, Human Resources.

3. Discuss the issues with the urban healthcare system in India. Explain how greater role for local bodies can boost urban healthcare provided administrative challenges are addressed. (250 words)

Reference:  Live Mint

Why the question:

The article from Livemint explains how the third tier of government can bolster urban health.

Key Demand of the question:

Discuss the issues with the urban healthcare system in India. Explain how greater role for local bodies can boost urban healthcare provided administrative challenges are addressed.

Directive:

Discuss – This is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Brief about the urban healthcare system in India.

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

First explain the issues with urban healthcare system in the country. Less focus on urban health, Lack of primary health infrastructure, Absence of urban sub-centres (SCs): Most states do not have urban sub-centres (SCs), people’s first point of access for healthcare services. ‘Over-hospitalization’: Urban areas suffer from ‘over-hospitalization’ of basic care etc.

Discuss the Government initiatives to improve urban healthcare.

Then explain the need of decentralized healthcare through ULBs.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction

As per UN HABITAT, by 2050 60% population of India will live in cities. The extent to which India’s health system can cater to this large population will determine the country’s success in achieving universal health coverage. But the recent COVID pandemic has starkly highlighted the precarious condition of India’s urban healthcare system.

Body

Issues with Urban healthcare :

  1. Rural-urban disparity : Until recently, Union government mostly focused on rural healthcare. Ex: expenditure on urban areas was ₹850 crore in 2019-20, compared to nearly ₹30,000 crore for rural.
  2. Lack of government primary and preventive health infrastructure : Against a norm-based target of 9,072 urban primary health centres (UPHCs), only 5,190 are operational.
  3. Most states do not have urban sub-centres (SCs), people’s first point of access for healthcare services. There are only 3,000 urban SCs compared to over 150,000 in rural areas.
  4. Urban areas also suffer from ‘over-hospitalization’ of basic care, ideally done in clinics.
  5. Lack of devolution of  functions by state government and inadequate role clarity among various health-related agencies
  6. Poor financial condition of  ULBs, and low priority accorded to health

Role of ULB in urban healthcare systems:

  • Local bodies understand the ground realities better: Since they are closer to the communities they serve, they are more responsive to the demands of citizens, given their greater direct accountability and accessibility.
  • Experiences from Argentina and Brazil, and closer home in Kerala, show that the decentralization of healthcare to ULBs is beneficial. Ex: The probability of low birth weight, a key health outcome, fell by 23% in Argentina.
  • Recent Finance Commission grants to ULBs provide an opportunity to reshape urban health.

But above roles can be successful only when municipal bodies are supported with capacities in governance, contracting, procurement, monitoring, and evaluation. State-level project management units (PMUs) should assist ULBs on technical and managerial matters.

Conclusion

With swelling urban population, a robust health system is necessary to ensure people’s well-being, resilience and productivity. As per, Article 243W—function of public health could be devolved to municipalities at the state’s discretion. The key now is to strengthen the third tier of Indian governance and build the capacity of ULBs thus addressing the efficient service-delivery in urban healthcare. Recent provision of ₹5,000crore in 2021-22budget for urban primary health is a right step in this direction.

 

 


General Studies – 3


 

Topic: Indian Economy and issues relating to planning, mobilization, of resources, growth, development and employment. Infrastructure: Energy, Ports, Roads, Airports, Railways etc

4. Discuss the contributions of Auto Industry in India’s economic growth. (250 words)

Reference:  Indian Express  

Why the question:

The article brings to us the importance of Auto industry to the economic growth of the country.

Key Demand of the question:

Discuss the contributions of Auto Industry in India’s economic growth.

Directive:

Discuss – This is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

The Auto industry has the potential to compete with global leaders. It must work with the government to grow by 10-12 per cent per year for the next 10 years, and more importantly, grow responsibly.

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

  • Explain how the automobile industry contributed to the Indian economy? – The automobile sector is a key player in the global and Indian economy. The global motor vehicle industry (four-wheelers) contributes 5 per cent directly to the total manufacturing employment,12.9 per cent to the total manufacturing production value and 8.3 per cent to the total industrial investment.
  • What is the present position of automobile industry in India?
  • Why is the automobile industry important?

Conclusion:

Conclude with efforts of the government in this direction.

Introduction

India became the fourth largest auto market in 2019 displacing Germany with about 3.99 million units sold in the passenger and commercial vehicles categories. India is expected to displace Japan as the third largest auto market by 2021. The two-wheeler segment dominates the market in terms of volume owing to a growing middle class and a young population. Moreover, the growing interest of the companies in exploring the rural markets further aided the growth of the sector.

Body

Rise of Auto Industry in India

Three factors have contributed to rise of auto industry in India

  • Today, India’s auto suppliers, both homegrown as well as the MNC offshoots — can rub shoulders with the best in the world.
  • Quality defects have reduced by a staggering 90 per cent and now compare favourably with most advanced markets.
  • Finally, and perhaps the most important, is our ability to design, engineer and develop world-class products completely in India.

Contributions of Auto Industry to India’s economic growth

  • The Indian auto industry truly embodies the spirit of Atmanirbhar Bharat, and perhaps many other industries can take some lessons from it.
  • The industry contributes 6.4 per cent to GDP, around 35 per cent to manufacturing GDP, supports over 8 million jobs directly (OEMs, suppliers and dealers) and as many as 30 million more in the value chain.
  • It accounts for cumulative investments of $35 billion over last 10 years, and generates export revenue of $27 billion that is nearly 8 per cent of the total merchandise exports from India.
  • The auto industry does a lot of good for the MSME sector which is a big employment generator for India and an important cog in the Indian economy.
  • The MSME share of value-addition to a car is 35 per cent.
  • Further, the automotive aftermarket provides economic opportunities to thousands of MSMEs.
  • While no official count is available, one estimate puts the total number of MSMEs engaged in the auto value chain in the range of 25,000-30,000.

Challenges faced today

  • Automobile sales in India witnessed its sharpest decline in nearly 19 years in July 2019, dropping 18.71%, rendering almost 15,000 workers jobless over the past quarter.
  • This year, in major parts of the world, the automobile sector is witnessing slowdown, sale figures are low in Europe and in the USA, only from the month of July, the situation has improved a little.
  • In the past two years, when the market was good, auto sales in cities like Delhi, Mumbai and Bangalore were declining. The growth was coming from the small town India.
  • The ecosystem in the small towns has got disturbed, may be due to demonetisation and transition to the Goods and Services Tax (GST).
  • Uncertainty on BS VI norms also killed auto sales.

Way Forward

  • The present slump in the automobile industry seems to be a temporary phase. Festive season and good monsoon will provide a much needed trigger.
  • At least for some time, there is a need to reduce GST on entry level cars and that on the two wheelers. The state governments also need to reduce the road tax.
  • Liquidity needs to be converted into aggressiveness or willingness to finance. The NBFCs need to be encouraged to provide finance to people for buying cars. This would help in increasing sales of cars at retail level.
  • The market is large enough to accommodate both internal combustion engines as well as Electric Vehicles. The government just needs to frame its policies accordingly.
  • Overall, there is a need to provide a boost to the economy, so that disposable income of people increases and thus the overall demand.
  • The government needs to ensure that the auto industry does not bear the brunt of transition to more environment-friendly fuels i.e. BS VI compliant fuels.
  • If the nation wants to be a $5 trillion economy, it cannot happen without the auto industry making a major contribution.

 

Topic: Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment.

5. India’s low forest cover (less than the ideal case of 1/3rd of total geographic area) and worsening wildfires warrants for ramping up of firefighting capabilities. Explain. (250 words)

Reference:  Business standard

Why the question:

The question is about the impact of worsening wildfires in India.

Key Demand of the question:

Discuss mainly the need to ramp up the firefighting capabilities in order to save our forests from the wildfires.

Directive:

Explain – Clarify the topic by giving a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

According to the Forest Survey of India, there is an upswing in forest fires.

Body:

Discuss first what wildfires in the forests are, what their impact are.

Increased frequency of forest blazes: Around 30,000 jungle fires were recorded across the country in 2019. Increased vulnerable area: Two-third of the country’s forests is now vulnerable to fires.

Discuss the factors responsible for the upswing in forest fires. Talk about both human and natural factors.

Explain the importance of ramping up firefighting capabilities.

Conclusion:

Suggest solutions and conclude with way forward.

Introduction

According to a 2019 report by the Forest Survey of India (FSI) about 21.40% of forest cover in India is prone to fires. With the impacts of climate change, frequency and intensity of wildfires is on the rampant rise. Recent Uttarakhand forest fire provides an evidence for this.

Body

Causes of forest fires :

  • Natural causes such as lightning or rubbing of dry bamboos.
  • Climate change: increasing occurrences of heat waves and delayed monsoon are worrying causes of wildfire.
  • Friction of electricity cables with dry leaves and woods
  • Deliberate fires by locals: Anthropogenic causes such as burning matchstick, left over cigarette /bidi by minor forest collectors can cause massive forest fire especially in areas with dried biomass.

Strategies to mitigate wildfires:

  • Satellite tracking and forecasting fire prone days
  • Community collaboration to create awareness and mitigate wildfire incidents by clearing dried biomass
  • Growing strips of fire hardy plant species within the forest and creating fire lines  to prevent the fire from spreading
  • Early detection and quick fire fighting squads in fire prone areas is crucial
  • Strengthening Van Panchayats by providing incentives for protecting the forests.
  • Waterholes should be developed across forests to recharge ground water and maintain moisture in the soil

Conclusion

Unfortunately the current fire fighting capabilities of India’s forest departments are at best rudimentary. This is evident in the case of Uttarakhand wildfire incident. The immediate need is to strengthen forest department’s rapid response system with modern equipments, adequate number of vehicles, enough field staff. Along with this it is imperative to involve local communities to prevent large outbreaks in India’s precious carbon sinks.

 

Topic: Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment.

6. Devoid of a focus on habitat conservation, success of project Elephant may tip to more man-animal conflict. Discuss. (250 words)

Reference:  researchgate.net

Why the question:

Explain the correlation of man-animal conflict and habitat conservation.

Key Demand of the question:

Explain in what way devoid of a focus on habitat conservation, success of project Elephant may tip to more man-animal conflict.

Directive:

Discuss – This is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with importance of habitat conservation.

Body:

Discuss first the project Elephant and the current situation of elephants in India.

Explain the issue of Human-Animal conflict due to decreasing habitat and increasing Elephant population. Man animal conflict leads to crop damage, animal deaths, loss of human life, injuries to people, and injuries to wildlife, livestock depredation, and low compensation for such incidents further leads to degraded living standards of the affected population.

Briefly discuss the other reasons for habitat loss and challenges of its conservation.

Conclusion:

The Elephant population seems to be growing in various states which is a positive sign but as the country celebrates its conservation success, policymakers and scientists will have to put their heads together to devise more creative solutions and find homes for the increasing number of Elephants, because without the focus on habitat conservation, the human-animal conflict is bound to rise.

Introduction

Human–elephant conflict in India, driven by habitat loss and an expanding human population, is a complex challenge for biodiversity conservation. The global loss of wild habitats and the expansion of human populations have intensified conflicts between people and wildlife.

Body

Project Elephant: It is a centrally sponsored scheme and was launched in February 1992 for the protection of elephants, their habitats and corridors. The Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change provides the financial and technical support to major elephant range states in the country through the project.

Issue of Man-animal conflict due to habitat loss

  • Depleting forest cover, encroachment in forested areas and the human settlements have come close to the forest areas.
  • Excess mining, dams construction and heavy traffic movement in forested area causes animal attacks on humans.
  • Construction in forested areas affects the habitat of elephants which cause man-animal conflict.
  • Depletion of the natural base, changing crop patterns, suitability of man modified habitats to wild animals, presence of stray dogs and cattle in forest fringe areas.
  • Lack of buffer zone between wildlife and human settlement.
  • Increased disturbance due to collection of fuel wood, fodder, water etc. from the forests has also increased the incidences of man-animal conflict.
  • Intensifying land uses have led to degradation, fragmentation and loss of elephant habitat, and have driven elephants into contact with people, particularly in cultivated areas.
  • Conflict between elephants and people results when elephants feed on crops, destroy farms or homes, or injure or kill people, and when people retaliate against these losses.
  • Sonitpur District, in the state of Assam in north-east India, has been referred to as a ground zero for human–elephant conflict. An estimated 60% of the elephants in Sonitpur and adjoining districts have disappeared in the last 5years, many from poisoning, and there have been many human deaths caused by elephants.

Reasons for habitat loss

  • As we exhaust natural resources, the homes of many animals are lost in the process.
  • Another type of habitat loss takes place by altering the land in a way that confuses the animals and disrupts their natural way of living. This is called habitat fragmentation and it occurs when we create roads and place attractions in the midst of woodlands and other natural areas.
  • Fragmentation can separate animals from one another and from their food sources. This happens both in water and on land.
  • Beneath the water, structures such as dams tend to isolate species from one another, making it more difficult for them to mate and find food.
  • For the many animals that depend on migration to preserve their species, fragmenting habitats takes away this advantage.
  • Habitat Degradation occurs by pollution that causes habitats to be destroyed because it changes the quality of air, water, and land while becoming a breeding ground for toxins.
  • Degradation of the environment allows species that are not part of an ecosystem to invade the area. Known as invasive species, they naturally contribute to the downfall of other animals and plants.

Conclusion

Finding ways for people and elephants to coexist will, therefore, be critical to the success of conservation efforts that seek to balance the needs of people and wildlife. The Elephant population seems to be growing in various states which is a positive sign but as the country celebrates its conservation success, policymakers and scientists will have to put their heads together to devise more creative solutions and find homes for the increasing number of Elephants, because without the focus on habitat conservation, the human-animal conflict is bound to rise.

 

 


General Studies – 4


 

Topic: Case study

7. You, a reporter currently working as an intern, accompanied a small group of reporters to a political event organized by the ruling party’s state unit. The party was followed by dinner where you were also asked to join. Here, you noticed that alcohol was being served to some members of the ruling party. Consumption of alcohol had been declared illegal in the state a few months ago and the ban is being enforced strictly across the state. The other reporters in your group ignored the issue and asked you to ignore it as well. However, it was clear to you that the law was not being followed.

Identify the issues involved in this scenario. What are your duties in such a scenario? What course of action would you follow and why? Explain. (250 words)

Reference:  Ethics, Integrity and Aptitude by Lexicon Publications.

Why the question:

The question is a case study based on ethical issues like political apathy, insensitivity and lack of values.

Key Demand of the question:

Identify the issues in the case study and analyse it while giving your course of action.

Directive:

Explain – Clarify the topic by giving a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with the nuances of the case study .

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

Discuss issues such as political apathy, insensitivity and lack of values.

Highlight the duties as an ethical journalist and a responsible citizen.

Discuss the action which you would take.

Conclusion:

Present your course of action and reason it.

Introduction

The case involved both ethical journalism and ethical conscience of a young reporter who is asked to blatantly lie and hide a grave violation of rules. Not only is this illegal, but shows how the law makers themselves are the law breakers.

Body

Stakeholders

  • The young journalist
  • Lawmakers consuming alcohol in dry state
  • State government and revenue loss
  • Police and Law and order problem in the state.
  • Experienced reporters and their ethical judgement

(a)Issues involved in the scenario

  • Journalists cannot always guarantee ‘truth’, but getting the facts right is the cardinal principle of journalism. In this case, not reporting the truth is injurious to the State and its governance
  • Journalists must be independent voices; they should not act, formally or informally, on behalf of special interests whether political, corporate or cultural. Hiding the truth upholds the belief that, Big Fish never fry and reinforces the same.
  • As a young journalist, this should not be the example that should be set especially whence starting the career.
  • Accountability of law makers is violated when they themselves are unravelling the laws made in the state.

(b)Duties

As a reporter, I am accountable to my conscience and adhere to the ideals of responsible journalism. Reporters and journalists are public watchdogs who bring to notice the wrongdoings in law and order or governance thereby enforcing accountability of public servants and politicians.

By not revealing the wrongdoing, not only leads to shielding the culprits, it also sets a wrong precedent. Unbiased reporting is the hallmark of a journalist and reporter.

(c)Course of Action

Being a young intern, it would be difficult to register protest in the function against the serving of liquor. I would rather carry strong evidence against the violation and give the same to the media houses. Wrong does not cease to be wrong if majority share in it. We are answerable to our conscience and the guilt of not doing one’s job well would always haunt me especially as I am entering the field of journalism.

The main reason for eroding credibility of media and reporting is because of the strong nexus between the politicians and media houses and excessive focus on revenue making from sensational news. To restore this, the need of the hour is honest and truthful reporting. Moreover, one cannot have different rules and laws for different people. Rule of law must be upheld and everyone is same and treated equal before the law of the land.

Conclusion

In a democracy everyone is accountable to the people, and so is the media and the law makers. Therefore, Indian media must introspect and develop a sense of responsibility and maturity and always upheld truthfulness.


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