Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Insights SECURE SYNOPSIS: 6 April 2021


NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same time gives you extra points in the form of background information.


General Studies – 1


 

Topic: Social empowerment, communalism, regionalism & secularism.

1. Analyse the causes and consequences of modern racism and discuss the need to have renewed commitment to combat discrimination. (250 words)

Reference:  The Hindu

Why the question:

International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on March 21 provides an opportunity to explore the causes and consequences of modern racism and renew commitment to combat discrimination.

Key Demand of the question:

One must analyse the causes and consequences of modern racism and discuss the need to have renewed commitment to combat discrimination.

Directive:

AnalyzeWhen asked to analyse, you have to examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them as a whole in a summary.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with brief background of the question.

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

In the answer body explain first the different forms of Racism. Then discuss what you understand by modern racism; becoming complex and covert; Anonymity of the internet allowed racist stereotypes and inaccurate information to spread online. Continuing structural forms of discrimination, prejudiced attitudes and discriminatory acts.

Analyse the causes and consequences of modern racism.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction

The marginalization and/or oppression of people of color based on a socially constructed racial hierarchy that privileges white people is called as Racism. Modern Racism has manifested due to migration and globalization. For instance, mass targeting of Asian women in America, shows the ways in which racism has spread its wings. George Floyd movement showed that systemic racism is still intact.

Body

Causes of modern racism

Current forms of racism and discrimination are complex and often covert.

  • The anonymity of the Internet has allowed racist stereotypes and inaccurate information to spread online.
  • At the onset of the pandemic, traffic to hate sites and specific posts against Asians grew by 200% in the U.S.
  • In India and in Sri Lanka, social media groups and messaging platforms were used to call for social and economic boycotts of religious minorities, amid false information accusing them of spreading the virus.
  • Structural forms of discrimination, including micro-aggressions and everyday indignities, remain widespread.
  • The use of new technologies and artificial intelligence in security raise the spectre of ‘techno-racism’, as facial recognition programmes can misidentify and target racialised communities.

Consequences of Racism

  • Prejudiced attitudes and discriminatory acts, whether subtle or overt, aggravate existing inequalities in societies.
  • A study published by The Lancet drew attention to the social dimension of the COVID-19 pandemic and the greater vulnerability of ethnic minorities, who have been disproportionately affected.
  • The World Health Organization has cautioned on the dangers of profiling and stigmatising communities that can lead to fear and the subsequent concealment of cases and delays in detection.
  • Women and girls also carry a double burden of being exposed to racial and gender-based prejudices. Racial discrimination deepens and fuels inequality in our societies.

Combatting discrimination and racist tendencies

  • UNESCO’s headquarters in Paris hosted a Global Forum against Racism and Discrimination on March 22, 2021, in partnership with the Republic of Korea. The Forum gathered policymakers, academics, and partners to initiate a new multi-stakeholder partnership on anti-racism.
  • The new proposed road map to tolerance calls for a multisectoral effort to tackle the root causes of racism through anti-racist laws, policies and programmes.
  • The role of education is crucial in providing the space for young people to understand processes that sustain racism, to learn from the past, and to stand up for human rights.
  • Through new approaches to inter-cultural dialogue and learning, youth and communities can be equipped with skills to eradicate harmful stereotypes and foster tolerance.
  • The International Coalition of Inclusive and Sustainable Cities provides an additional platform for city-level planning and a laboratory for good practices in the fight against racism.

Conclusion

Recent and new manifestations of racism and discrimination call for renewed commitments to mobilise for equality. Racism will not be overcome with mere professions of good faith but must be combatted with anti-racist action. A global culture of tolerance, equality and anti-discrimination is built first and foremost in the minds of women and men.

 

Topic: Social empowerment

2. Along with providing salary to housework (which was recently acknowledged by political parties), there is a need to address the larger issues related to women’s employment. Comment.(250 words)

Reference:  Indian Express

Why the question:

The article explains how along with providing salary to housework (which was recently acknowledged by political parties), there is a need to address the larger issues related to women’s employment.

Key Demand of the question:

Discuss the need to address the larger issues related to women’s employment.

Directive:

Comment– here we have to express our knowledge and understanding of the issue and form an overall opinion thereupon.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with what you understand by housework.

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

Explain first the factors responsible for sudden recognition of housework; Breaking of the myth that housework is easy, talk about the Added responsibilities in housework etc.

Then discuss the problems associated with women’s employment.

Suggest solutions- need to address the exclusionary and discriminatory tendencies in the labour market.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward, suggest solutions.

Introduction

Women bear the brunt of maximum unpaid work in the economy. India particularly, is a country where this phenomenon is at its worst, with women putting in 352 minutes a day into domestic work while men put in only 51.8.

At a time when four states and the UT of Puducherry are heading for elections, housework and recognising those who do it have become topics of public discourse. In the poll-bound states in south India, housework has figured in manifestos. In Kerala, the ruling Left government has promised pensions for people who do housework.

Body

The acknowledgement of housework by political parties is surely the beginning of a welcome realisation of the need to reorient society to women’s contribution to housework. But there is a need to explain the apathy of political parties to women’s employment questions and their reluctance to address women’s exclusion in employment.

Larger issues of women’s employment and labour force participation

  • Workforce participation rates of women have been declining even before the pandemic. The labour force participation rate was 23%.
  • The data and field reports during the pandemic indicate a worsening of women’s employment with the participation rates falling to 11 per cent, against 71 per cent for men as per CMIE data.
  • The decline is biased towards urban areas with the rate falling to 6.9 per cent. This fall in female employment is a matter of critical concern but has not received the required attention from political parties.
  • Volunteer workers (ASHAs, Anganwadi volunteers and other scheme workers), though a part of the state machinery, are not even acknowledged as workers and are denied all labour rights.
  • Paid domestic work is another sector which has for long been neglected from the perspective of labour laws and policies. In India as per PLFS 2018-19 data, there are considerable wage differentials between male and female workers, be it casual or regular wage work.
  • It is true that women are never free from housework even when they are engaged as paid workers and primary breadwinners, and unpaid housework impacts women’s participation and nature of paid work.

Measures Needed to improve women’s employment

  • Subdued gender participation emanates from social-economic issues, which can be treated by bringing behavioural change. This can be changed if more women are given leadership positions.
  • There is a need to invest significantly in the care economy and social protection, and redefine Gross Domestic Product to make work in the home visible and counted.
  • There is a need to remove barriers to women’s full inclusion in the economy, including through access to the labour market, property rights and targeted credit and investments.
  • Women-oriented government initiatives such as Beti Bachao Beti Padhao, Knowledge Involvement in Research Advancement through Nurturing (KIRAN) Scheme, represent steps in the right direction.
  • India should enact an emergency response plan to address violence against women and girls, and follow through with funding, policies, and political will to end this scourge.

Conclusion

Addressing exclusionary and discriminatory tendencies in the labour market is surely a way to redefine the labour of women and this also needs to be given the required attention. World Bank, noted that “no country can develop and achieve its full potential if half of its population is locked in non-remunerative, less productive and non-economic activities.” Therefore, in a country where young women’s education is now at par with men’s, ignoring that half of the population isn’t participating equally in the economy means we are missing out on innovation, entrepreneurship, and productivity gains.

 


General Studies – 2


 

Topic: Welfare schemes for vulnerable sections of the population by the Centre and States and the performance of these schemes; mechanisms, laws, institutions and Bodies constituted for the protection and betterment of these vulnerable sections.

3. Explain the salient features of National Policy of Rare disease 2021.How do you think it is a way forward in ensuring citizen’s well-being in the country? (250 words)

Reference:  The Hindu

Why the question:

The article talks about the National police of rare disease 2021.

Key Demand of the question:

Explain the salient features of National Policy of Rare disease 2021. And explain its utility.

Directive:

Explain – Clarify the topic by giving a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with briefing of the recent notification of the National Policy for Rare Diseases 2021.

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

Discuss its objectives –

  • To increase focus on indigenous research and local production of medicines.
  • To lower the cost of treatment of rare diseases.
  • To screen and detect rare diseases early at early stages, which will in turn help in their prevention.

Explain the major provisions of the policy.

Discuss in what way it helps and aids well-being of the public, quote examples.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way ahead.

Introduction

WHO defines rare disease as often debilitating lifelong disease or disorder with a prevalence of 1 or less, per 1000 population. As per an estimate, there are 7,000 known rare diseases with an estimated 300 million patients in the world; 70 million are in India. According to the Organization for Rare Diseases India, these include inherited cancers, autoimmune disorders, congenital malformations, Hirschsprung’s disease, Gaucher disease, cystic fibrosis, muscular dystrophies and Lysosomal Storage Disorders (LSDs).

Body

National Policy of Rare Diseases 2021

  • The Rare Diseases Policy aims to lower the high cost of treatment for rare diseases with increased focus on indigenous research with the help of a National Consortium to be set up with Department of Health Research, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare as convenor.
  • Increased focus of research and development and local production of medicines will lower the cost of treatment for rare diseases.
  • The policy also envisages creation of a national hospital-based registry of rare diseases so that adequate data is available for definition of rare diseases and for research and development related to rare diseases within the country.
  • The Policy also focuses on early screening and prevention through primary and secondary health care infrastructure such as Health and Wellness Centres and District Early Intervention Centres (DEICs) and through counselling for the high-risk parents.
  • Screening will also be supported by Nidan Kendras set up by Department of Biotechnology.
  • Policy also aims to strengthen tertiary health care facilities for prevention and treatment of rare diseases through designating 8 health facilities as Centre of Excellence and these CoEs will also be provided one-time financial support of up to Rs 5 crores for upgradation of diagnostics facilities.
  • A provision for financial support up to 20 lakhs under the Umbrella Scheme of Rastriya Arogya Nidhi is proposed for treatment, of those rare diseases that require a one-time treatment (diseases listed under Group 1 in the rare disease policy).
  • Beneficiaries for such financial assistance would not be limited to BPL families, but the benefit will be extended to about 40% of the population, who are eligible under Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana.
  • Besides, the Policy also envisages a crowd funding mechanism in which corporates and individuals will be encouraged to extend financial support through a robust IT platform for treatment of rare diseases.
  • Funds so collected will be utilized by Centres of Excellence for treatment of all three categories of rare diseases as first charge and then the balance financial resources could also be used for research.

Significance of the policy

  • The field of rare diseases is complex and heterogeneous. The landscape of rare diseases is constantly changing, as there are new rare diseases and conditions being identified and reported regularly in medical literature.
  • Apart from a few rare diseases, where significant progress has been made, the field is still at a nascent stage.
  • For a long time, doctors, researchers and policy makers were unaware of rare diseases and until very recently there was no real research or public health policy concerning issues related to the field.
  • Moreover, families that have members with rare diseases are either unaware or found helpless in treating them either due to no home-grown expertise or lack of finances to bear the burden.
  • This policy helps in tackling rare diseases in a holistic and comprehensive manner.

Issues yet to be addressed

  • The notification of the Policy comes as a logical conclusion to a long-fought battle, and yet, stops short of delivering the complete mandate.
  • As per the Policy, diseases such as LSD for which definitive treatment is available, but costs are prohibitive, have been categorised as Group 3.
  • However, no funding has been allocated for the immediate and lifelong treatment needs, for therapies already approved by the Drugs Controller General of India.
  • Experts point out that the costs to help already-diagnosed patients might be in the range of ₹80-₹100 crore annually.
  • If the Centre can extend the cost-sharing agreements that it has worked out with Kerala, Tamil Nadu and Karnataka, with other States too, its share of the annual costs will be halved.
  • The Centre can, however, still set aside a substantial corpus to fund life-saving treatments, even as it rolls out the policy.
  • Doing so will not only complete a job well begun — even if not yet half done — but also cement its commitment towards the welfare of every single citizen in India.

Conclusion

It is binding on a welfare state to take care of every single citizen. Securing the wellbeing of every one, particularly those unable to help themselves, irrespective of whether they constitute a critical mass or not, is important.

 

 


General Studies – 3


 

Topic: Indian Economy and issues relating to planning, mobilization, of resources, growth, development and employment.

4. In trying to achieve the goal of a $5-trillion economy, the government should ensure that the growth is inclusive. Discuss the challenges (250 words)

Reference:  Tribune India

Why the question:

The article explains how in trying to achieve the goal of a $5-trillion economy, the government should ensure that the growth is inclusive.

Key Demand of the question:

One is

Directive:

Discuss – This is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with the context of the question.

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

Challenges in becoming a $5-trillion economy – Target in itself is big: Not easy to reach $5 trillion by 2024-25 with present Real Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is only close to $2 trillion, explain that Growth of the Gross National Product (GNP) is not development, Threat of rising inequality, Possibility of egregious consequences in trying to achieve the growth etc.

Suggest what needs to be done.

Conclusion:

Conclude that government should strategize growth and development where all essential objectives of development are met rather than trying to do distribution or waiting for trickle-down.

Introduction

The concept of inclusive growth focuses on equitable growth for all sections of society. This involves ensuring that fruits of growth and development reach the poor and marginalized sections as well. Inclusiveness is a multi-dimensional concept. Inequalities that include, social exclusion, discrimination, restrictions on migration, constraints on human development, lack of access to finance and insurance, corruption – are sources of inequality and limit the prospect for economic advancement among certain segments of the population, thereby perpetuating poverty.

Body

Inclusive growth in India: Issues

  • The top 10% of the Indian population holds 77% of the total national wealth. 73% of the wealth generated in 2017 went to the richest 1%, while 67 million Indians who comprise the poorest half of the population saw only a 1% increase in their wealth.
  • Many ordinary Indians are not able to access the health care they need. 63 million of them are pushed into poverty because of healthcare costs every year – almost two people every second.
  • It would take 941 years for a minimum wage worker in rural India to earn what the top paid executive at a leading Indian garment company earns in a year.

Challenges in achieving $5 trillion economy with inclusive growth

The achievement of an aspirational goal of $5 trillion in a limited timeframe, with an initial position of below $2-trillion real GDP post-pandemic looks difficult. Even if we come back to the pre-pandemic pathway by 2025, we may reach this target by 2035. However, more pressing point is the kind of economic growth that is needed.

  • Inequality and economic stress: During the pandemic, nearly 31 million families have moved down from the middle class and nearly 100 million people have lost jobs. On the contrary, the industry is happy reducing the wage bills, doing mechanisation and raising its profits.
  • MSME’s and job creation dwindling: The industries that are most likely to create employment, i.e. the medium and small industries, are going down under and the large ones which do not create employment are the ones that will get the 6 per cent productivity-linked incentive from the tax paid by the average taxpayers.
  • Non-inclusive: Our health system is broken and our education system finds it difficult to fly out of the morass. India stands at the 102nd spot on the global hunger index, 102nd on the human development index, 4th from the bottom on the world happiness index, 141st on the gender equality index, 142nd on the poverty index.
    • The GDP can jump to $5 trillion if the GNP per capita increases by $2,000. But how this $2,000 per capita goes and to whom it goes matters.
    • If it majorly goes to the eight lakh dollar millionaires and the 5,000 ultra-rich billionaires, it hardly means anything for the improvement in the quality of life for the bottom 50 per cent of the population.
  • Inclusive Growth: It is not growth per se, but the type of growth that matters. Whether the growth dividends go to a minority or are more distributed, whether they create employment and basic quality of life for the majority or get spent on what the elite want will define their impact on the population.

Measures to be taken

  • Lowering the incidence of poverty and inequality requires a comprehensive strategy.
  • Important steps need to be taken like framing policies to improve health, nutrition and education.
  • Labour market reforms and reforms of direct taxation will have redistributive effects on the system.
  • Schemes like National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (NREGS), provide 100 days or more of employment at a wage determined by government are already in progress but there is a need to check the cost effectiveness of these schemes
  • Reforms to plug the leakages in the PDS, introduction of GPS tracking, activating vigilance committees, must be undertaken across the country.
  • Research needs to be carried out by government agencies to document the ‘best practices’ in the implementation of government schemes.
  • Minorities and other excluded groups, including the poor in upper castes, also need special programmes to bring them into the mainstream.

 Conclusion

Instead of the governments either trying to do distribution (if at all they do, they do it poorly) or waiting for trickle-down — which has mostly proved to be a myth — it is better they strategize growth and development where all three essential objectives of development are met.

 

Topic: Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment.

5. Examine the new challenges and strategies on water and its management on account of climate change. (250 words)

Reference:  Business Standard

Why the question:

The article presents an overview of new challenges and strategies on water and its management on account of climate change.

Key Demand of the question:

Analyse the new challenges and strategies on water and its management on account of climate change.

Directive:

Examine – When asked to ‘Examine’, we must look into the topic (content words) in detail, inspect it, investigate it and establish the key facts and issues related to the topic in question. While doing so we should explain why these facts and issues are important and their implications.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with some key data on water resources and its interlinkages with climate change.  

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

Implications of climate change on water management – Greater water evaporation. Drying up of moisture in the soil, making the land dusty and increase the need for irrigation, further intensifying land degradation. Increased demand for water from drinking and irrigation to fighting fires in forests or buildings. Increased extreme rain events; we can expect rain to come like a flood, making the cycle of floods followed by droughts even more intense.

Present some solutions, Strategies for addressing the new water challenges.

Conclusion:

Conclude with importance of water management.

Introduction

Resources, especially water and biodiversity determine the economy of an area. With judicious utilization of these resources, a country can sustain the resources for future generations. NITI Ayog in its CWMI Composite Water Management Index Report noted that India is undergoing the worst water crisis in its history and nearly 600 million people are facing high to extreme water stress.

 

Body

Challenges of water on account of climate change

  • Water and weather, the delicate balance between evaporation and precipitation, is the primary cycle through which climate change is felt. As our climate changes, droughts, floods, melting glaciers, sea-level rise and storms intensify or alter, often with severe consequences. Eg: More tropical cyclones in Arabian sea like Cyclone Nisarga.
  • When disasters hit, they can destroy or contaminate entire water supplies, increasing the risk of diseases like cholera and typhoid to which children are particularly vulnerable.
  • Rising temperatures can lead to deadly pathogens in freshwater sources, making the water dangerous for people to drink.
  • Climate change exacerbates water stress – areas of extremely limited water resources – leading to increased competition for water, even conflict.
  • Rising sea levels are causing fresh water to become salty, compromising the water resources millions of people rely on.

Strategies on water management

In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, climate change adaptation will have to build climate resilience. Adaptation must better equip societies to withstand shocks and disasters.

  • Nature-based solutions such as mangroves protecting shorelines from storms, lakes storing large water supplies and floodplains absorbing excess water runoff, are a key part of this strategy.
  • Putting adaptive Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) at the centre of planning and investment for climate change adaptation.
  • Efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions also depend on access to reliable water resources, as all mitigation actions need water to succeed.
  • Expansion of rainwater harvesting to improve rainfed cultivation and groundwater recharge.
  • Removal of invasive non-native vegetation from riparian areas.
  • Improvement of water-use efficiency by water recycling.
  • Spread of drought-resistant crops and improved management of irrigated agriculture, e.g., changing the cropping calendar, crop mix, irrigation method and repair and maintenance of irrigation infrastructure

Conclusion

Water crisis driven by climate change has compelled us to augment water availability by harvesting every drop of rainwater; use it much more efficiently so that every drop of that rainwater is valued in the food we eat or the water we flush; and ensure that every drop of that used water is reused and recycled and not degraded by pollution.

 

Topic: Challenges to internal security through communication networks, role of media and social networking sites in internal security challenges, basics of cyber security; money laundering and its prevention.

6. Addressing the gender injustices that motivate many to join Maoist cadres can help the Indian state contain this insurgency. Critically examine. (250 words)

Reference:  Live Mint

Why the question:

The article explains that addressing the gender injustices that motivate many to join Maoist cadres can help the Indian state contain this insurgency.

Key Demand of the question:

Explain how gender injustices act as motivation to Maoists and lead to insurgencies. How can these be prevented.

Directive:

Critically examine – When asked to ‘Examine’, we have to look into the topic (content words) in detail, inspect it, investigate it and establish the key facts and issues related to the topic in question. While doing so we should explain why these facts and issues are important and their implications. When ‘critically’ is suffixed or prefixed to a directive, one needs to look at the good and bad of the topic and give a fair judgment.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with some statistics related to Maoism in India.

Body:

Comment on expressions of gender motivators in the Red Corridor: Dominant presence of women in Maoist cadres: Women occupy 60% of total Maoist cadres and almost all operational and tactical positions responsible for sustaining Maoist rebellion. Moist appeal rooted in commitment towards women’s rights. Increasing layers of inequality: The Red Corridor’s SC/ST women know this first-hand as they endure layers of gender, caste, and class subjugation. Marginalisation of the rural economy.

Nevertheless, the above gender motivators act as just an illusion since female Maoists are face discrimination within the ranks. E.g. they face sexual assault and gendered division of roles such as cooking, cleaning and nursing.

Conclusion:

Suggest what needs to be done, conclude with solutions.

Introduction

Female Maoists are a substantial 60% of Maoist cadres and occupy almost all operational and tactical positions responsible for sustaining the Maoist rebellion in India. For a security threat constituting such a sizeable number of female combatants, embracing the woman question should be central to conflict resolution.

Body

The umbrella grievance of women in the movement is that of gender inequality, which worsens problems of sexual assault, police brutality, atrocities against Scheduled Caste/Tribe (SC/ST) communities, and economic inequality.

Rise of women cadres in left-wing extremism: Reasons

  • Many ex-Maoist women, like Krishna Bandyopadhyay, admit Maoism’s appeal was rooted in its commitment to women’s rights.
  • The demand for gender equality is so potent that male Maoists themselves cannot escape it. In one instance, female combatants compelled the CPI (Marxist-Leninist) to admit its own patriarchal failings within the party and the overall insurgency.
  • The most gendered motivator, distinguishing female experience, is sexual assault. Crimes against women are more rampant in Maoist-affected areas than in other parts of the country.
  • Security personnel are known to use body searches, casual molestation, custodial rape, torture, threats of harm upon loved ones, etc., as warfare tactics against combatants and even civilian women.
  • National Crime Records Bureau data shows that Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh and Odisha alone registered 84,938 crimes against women in 2019.
  • Women face sexual harassment from the state as well as insurgents, with no avenues to seek justice. Many find it nearly impossible to even register a first information report with the police.
  • Evidently, police brutality and impunity pushes women towards Maoism, creating a cycle of violence.
  • Therefore, many women perceive Maoism as relief from poverty and unemployment.

Addressing gender injustice in fight against left wing extremism

  • Despite sustaining the uprising, female Maoists are rarely at the table during peace talks and ceasefire negotiations.
  • Even within the ranks, they face sexual assault and gendered division of roles such as cooking, cleaning and nursing.
  • Maoists are not immune to patriarchal attitudes and behaviour, suggesting a scope for the state to re-enter the discourse through effective gender-sensitive policies that offer women of the region a better alternative than joining the cadres.
  • The need of the hour is for the state to adequately address women’s ground realities in the region that push them toward radicalization.
  • The cadres’ patriarchal set-up doesn’t excuse the state’s own failings on gender equality. Female Maoists continue to outnumber men, with fresh reports suggesting numbers as high as 70% of their cadre strength.
  • Hence, State and Centre must collectively work to empower women, provide them security and education, finally bridging the developmental deficit.

Conclusion

Failing to address women’s grievances around patriarchy renders the state’s counter-terrorism response inadequate. The Indian state’s priority must be to diminish motivations, not demean them. The driving factors should not only be understood as incentives behind violence, but potential solutions for peaceful outcomes.

 

 


General Studies – 4


 

Topic: Case study

7. You, a reporter currently working as an intern, accompanied a small group of reporters to a political event organized by the ruling party’s state unit. The party was followed by dinner where you were also asked to join. Here, you noticed that alcohol was being served to some members of the ruling party. Consumption of alcohol had been declared illegal in the state a few months ago and the ban is being enforced strictly across the state. The other reporters in your group ignored the issue and asked you to ignore it as well. However, it was clear to you that the law was not being followed. (250 words)

(a) Identify the issues involved in this scenario.

(b) What are your duties in such a scenario?

(c) What course of action would you follow and why? 

Reference:  Ethics, Integrity and Aptitude

Why the question:

The question is a case study based on ethics and breach of law.

Key Demand of the question:

Analyse the case in detail, present your opinion with suitable backing.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Start with facts of the case.

Body:

The answer body must have the following aspects covered:

  • Discuss issues such as political apathy, insensitivity and lack of values.
  • Highlight the duties as an ethical journalist and a responsible citizen.
  • Discuss the action which you would take. Reason them with suitable substantiation.

Conclusion:

Reporting the illegal consumption of banned substances will help the administration curb smuggling and in better implementation of the law. The journalistic principles of truth and fairness and duty as a citizen of not remaining merely a spectator after witnessing an illegal act but raising my voice against it will be upheld. Consumption of alcohol by party members shows a clear case of hypocrisy. Such hypocrisy must be checked to have a government with integrity.

Introduction

The case involved both ethical journalism and ethical conscience of a young reporter who is asked to blatantly lie and hide a grave violation of rules. Not only is this illegal, but shows how the law makers themselves are the law breakers.

Body

Stakeholders

  • The young journalist
  • Lawmakers consuming alcohol in dry state
  • State government and revenue loss
  • Police and Law and order problem in the state.
  • Experienced reporters and their ethical judgement

(a)Issues involved in the scenario

  • Journalists cannot always guarantee ‘truth’, but getting the facts right is the cardinal principle of journalism. In this case, not reporting the truth is injurious to the State and its governance
  • Journalists must be independent voices; they should not act, formally or informally, on behalf of special interests whether political, corporate or cultural. Hiding the truth upholds the belief that, Big Fish never fry and reinforces the same.
  • As a young journalist, this should not be the example that should be set especially whence starting the career.
  • Accountability of law makers is violated when they themselves are unravelling the laws made in the state.

(b)Duties

As a reporter, I am accountable to my conscience and adhere to the ideals of responsible journalism. Reporters and journalists are public watchdogs who bring to notice the wrongdoings in law and order or governance thereby enforcing accountability of public servants and politicians.

By not revealing the wrongdoing, not only leads to shielding the culprits, it also sets a wrong precedent. Unbiased reporting is the hallmark of a journalist and reporter.

(c)Course of Action

Being a young intern, it would be difficult to register protest in the function against the serving of liquor. I would rather carry strong evidence against the violation and give the same to the media houses. Wrong does not cease to be wrong if majority share in it. We are answerable to our conscience and the guilt of not doing one’s job well would always haunt me especially as I am entering the field of journalism.

The main reason for eroding credibility of media and reporting is because of the strong nexus between the politicians and media houses and excessive focus on revenue making from sensational news. To restore this, the need of the hour is honest and truthful reporting. Moreover, one cannot have different rules and laws for different people. Rule of law must be upheld and everyone is same and treated equal before the law of the land.

Conclusion

In a democracy everyone is accountable to the people, and so is the media and the law makers. Therefore, Indian media must introspect and develop a sense of responsibility and maturity and always upheld truthfulness.


  • Join our Official Telegram Channel HERE for Motivation and Fast Updates
  • Subscribe to our YouTube Channel HERE to watch Motivational and New analysis videos