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Elaborate upon the ongoing Political instability in West Asia and North Africa; also explain in what way is it proving to be a fertile ground for Islamic States (IS) terrorists to operate.

Topic : GS-2: Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India’s interests, Indian diaspora.

GS-3: Security challenges and their management in border areas – linkages of organized crime with terrorism.

5. Elaborate upon the ongoing Political instability in West Asia and North Africa; also explain in what way is it proving to be a fertile ground for Islamic States (IS) terrorists to operate. (250 words)

Reference: The Hindu 

Why the question:

The article explains the UN counterterrorism chief’s statement to the Security Council on the continuing presence of Islamic State (IS) terrorists in West Asia, Africa and elsewhere is a serious warning to the countries in these regions.

Key Demand of the question:

Explain in detail the political instability in the West Asia and North Africa that are in a way fostering the operations of Islamic State Terrorists in the region.

Directive:

Elaborate – Give a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Discuss first the current context of the question.

Body:

Start by explaining the background of the question. Present the associated concerns in detail.

Explain in detail the Political instability in West Asia and North Africa: Ever since they lost territories, IS fighters withdrew from the front lines and started operating in cells in the deserts, mountains and hinterlands of conflict-ridden countries. Political instability in parts of West Asia and North Africa is allowing the IS space to operate.

Discuss what should be the way forward.

Conclusion:

Conclude that though the IS no longer controls any big city, its rise from a breakaway faction of al-Qaeda in Iraq to one of the world’s most potent terrorist groups should be a lesson for all stakeholders. The IS has its roots in the U.S. invasion of Iraq. It started growing by exploiting the civil war in Syria. The regional governments, as well as their international backers (and rivals), should be mindful of this fact. If they fail to address the regional fault-lines and continue to fight each other, the jihadists could emerge winners once again.