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Do you think Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA), 2005, is still a shining example of a radical and rational systemic change to address the challenges being faced by the poor in the rural areas of the country? Elucidate.

Topic: Issues relating to poverty and hunger. Welfare schemes for vulnerable sections of the population by the Centre and States and the performance of these schemes; mechanisms, laws, institutions and Bodies constituted for the protection and betterment of these vulnerable sections.

3. Do you think Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA), 2005, is still a shining example of a radical and rational systemic change to address the challenges being faced by the poor in the rural areas of the country? Elucidate. (250 words)

Reference: Indian Express 

Why the question:

The article talks about the a radical and rational systemic change that MGNREGA is potential of bringing in the current conditions and austerity caused due to the Covid situation in the country.

Key Demand of the question:

One has to explain in what way Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act (MGNREGA), 2005, is still a shining example of a radical and rational systemic change to address the challenges being faced by the poor in the rural areas of the country.

Directive:

Elucidate – Give a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

In short explain the current conditions of the rural poor in the country amidst the pandemic.

Body:

One has to explain the key features of the scheme, but remember the answer is not about discussing the scheme in itself but about discussing the nuances of the scheme, as to how it is radical and rational and is capable of bringing systemic change in the system and aid in addressing the current situation.

Explain that with the Act in place – Any citizen in rural India now had the legal right to demand work and was guaranteed 100 days of work with minimum wages provided by the government. And it proved its worth very quickly — a grassroots, demand-driven, Right to Work programme, unprecedented in its scale and architecture, focused on poverty alleviation. Millions have been saved from hunger and worse in the 15 years since its inception.

Conclusion:

Conclude with a positive note; highlight the importance of the scheme in the current situation.

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