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SECURE SYNOPSIS: 28 NOVEMBER 2019


SECURE SYNOPSIS: 28 NOVEMBER 2019


NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same time gives you extra points in the form of background information.


Topic: Indian Constitution– historical underpinnings, evolution, features, amendments, significant provisions and basic structure. Ethics and Human Interface: Essence, determinants and consequences of Ethics in human actions; dimensions of ethics; ethics in private and public relationships

1)  The fiercest, newest methods of justice delivery of naming and shaming cannot eschew the oldest tenets of ethics. The due process of law must to be followed. Discuss and present your points in the backdrop of #MeToo movement.(250 words)

The hindu

 

Why this question:

Recent incidents have made it evident that not all women had been entirely honest when jumping on the #MeToo campaign. It turns out that the society at large did not verify the narratives they received.

Key demand of the question:

One has to discuss the significance of due process of law in the delvery of justice.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

In brief highlight the #MeToo movement.

Body:

The #MeToo rewrote the rules of engagement. It forced men to take the idea of consent.

It pushed organizations to sit up and take notice of sexual harassment.

It ensured that due process mechanisms were set up in institutions. 

Discuss the concerns posed by such a movement.

Suggest solutions to overcome them.

Conclusion:

Conclude that while addressing the issue of sexual harassment, there is a need to explore how boundaries with respect to the rules of engagement between the opposite sexes can be drawn and respected in far more explicit ways by all genders in new-age sexual relationships. The digital age needs different customs and conventions.

Introduction:    

The #MeToo movement, which began as a hashtag on Twitter in 2017 has now become a global phenomenon. India is experiencing its second wave of the #MeToo movement, in which women—some of them public figures—have levelled sexual harassment charges against certain men, many of whom occupy powerful positions. Over the past few weeks, women in the entertainment industry and in journalism have used social media to name their alleged harassers.

Body:

Importance:

  • Tackling workplace sexual harassment is an ethical imperative and an economic imperative.
  • Such harassment infringes on an individual’s right to freedom of profession and occupation and undercuts the ideals of a modern democracy.
  • Getting and retaining more women in the workforce has the potential to be a major growth driver.
  • Many personal stories of anger and guilt, buried under years of silence, emerged out to public media because of this recent campaign.
  • It is creating awareness about sexual violence and sexual assault.
  • It reveals one thing -the legal and systemic provisions to deal with sexual harassment have failed.
  • Women who suffered silently for years are now angry enough to put their faith in a “name and shame” mechanism.
  • The campaign allows victims to find courage to name the accused through a collective.
  • This forces administrators or the people in charge to take the problem seriously and begin a process of redress.
  • It also aims to change the power dynamics between males and females by exposing the abuse of power and position by influential men for sexually harassing the women around them.
  • The #MeToo movement resonated at the opening plenary session of the fifth Global Symposium on Health Systems Research.
  • SDG 5 is about gender equality and calling out sexist behaviour which is at the heart of the #MeToo movement

Concerns / Challenges:

  • It has shown us that even the most privileged among women have not been spared from cultures of sexual harassment and exploitation.
  • If it has taken this long for women to come out in journalism/cinema, it will be difficult for women to speak up in the corporate world or other areas that are a lot more hierarchical.
  • There can be collateral damage with people getting wrongly accused.
  • Misuse:
    • ‘Amplifiers’, those who had called for accusations, collected and broadcast them. It turns out that some of them did not verify the narratives they received; and one amplifier’s own story has been challenged.
    • It’s disturbing to find that few women deleted their part of an online chat to make it seem like a one-sided solicitation, and that another concealed what might be a history of consensual sexting with the accused.
  • Women can experience health problems after workplace sexual harassment even by words also, a new study finds.
  • These health problems can include high blood pressure, poor-quality sleep, anxiety and symptoms of depression.
  • Greater gender diversity at the workplace—an area where India lags.

Conclusion:

There is no denying that #MeToo rewrote the rules of engagement. It forced men to take the idea of consent seriously. It pushed organisations to sit up and take notice of sexual harassment. It ensured that due process mechanisms were set up in institutions.

Way forward:

  • Besides taking this agenda further, we could perhaps now explore how boundaries can be drawn and respected in far more explicit ways by all genders in new-age sexual relationships. The digital age needs different mores.
  • More urgently, the women need understanding and a helping hand.
  • It takes tremendous courage to retract false statements, knowing how readily misogynists will pounce upon it, but one hopes more women will do so.
  • A clean-up can only help strengthen the movement, while giving all sides a measure of personal peace.

Topic:   Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

2) Discuss the key features of PMAY and explain in what way they can incentivise India’s construction and real estate sector to reduce its traditional obsession with affluent home buyers in the cities.(250 words)

Reference

Why this question:

The Union Government has launched the Credit-linked Subsidy Services Awas Portal (CLAP) for Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana-Housing for All (Urban). 

Key demand of the question:

One has to explain the importance of PMAY and the significant role it is playing in the development of the housing sector.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

In brief discuss about the Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana Urban (PMAY-U)

Body:

The answer must capture Significance of the scheme and its role in achieving the “Housing for All” target, implementational challenges and measures necessary for achieving the set target.

Also discuss the Key features of the Global Housing Technology Challenge (GHTC).

Narrate the objectives, benefits and issues involved if any.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:    

The PMAY- Urban was launched by the Ministry of Housing and Urban Poverty Alleviation (MoHUPA) in Mission mode. It envisions provision of Housing for All by 2022, when the Nation completes 75 years of its Independence. Minister for Housing and Urban Affairs recently launched Credit-linked Subsidy Services Awas Portal, CLAP, in New Delhi recently. The portal provides a transparent and robust real-time web-based monitoring system for credit-linked Subsidy Services, CLSS, beneficiaries.

Body:

Key features of PMAY:

  • The Mission seeks to address the housing requirement of urban poor including slum dwellers through following programme verticals:
    • Slum rehabilitation of Slum Dwellers with participation of private developers using land as a resource
    • Promotion of Affordable Housing for weaker section through credit linked subsidy
    • Affordable Housing in Partnership with Public & Private sectors
    • Subsidy for beneficiary-led individual house construction /enhancement.
    • CLSS is a component of PMAY under which, not only economically weaker sections, but also middle-income groups can avail of home loans at reduced EMIs.

Benefits of PMAY:

  • Beneficiaries include Economically weaker section (EWS), low-income groups (LIGs) and Middle Income Groups (MIGs).
  • “Housing for All” Mission for urban area is being implemented during 2015-2022 and this Mission will provide central assistance to implementing agencies through States and UTs for providing houses to all eligible families/beneficiaries by 2022.
  • Mission will be implemented as Centrally Sponsored Scheme (CSS) except for the component of credit linked subsidy which will be implemented as a Central Sector Scheme.
  • The aim of this scheme is to construct more than two crore houses across the length and breadth of the nation.
  • Government provide subsidy ranging between 1 lakh to 2.30 lakh to people from above categories in order to make them secure.
  • The government provide an interest subsidy of 6.5% on housing loans availed by the beneficiaries for a period of 15 years from the start of loan.
  • The houses under Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana would be allotted to preferably the female member of the family. Along with this, preference would be given to the female applicants. This scheme is mostly a pro-women scheme.
  • While allotting ground floors in any housing scheme under the PMAY, preference would be given to differently-abled and older people.
  • The construction of houses under PMAY would be carried out through technology that is eco-friendly.
  • It covers the entire urban area consisting of 4041 statutory towns with initial focus on 500 Class I cities.

PMAY and its limitations:

  • The Government’s Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana-Urban (PMAY-U) Mission to provide all weather “pucca” houses to eligible beneficiaries by the year 2022.
  • Government has to mobilise Rs 1 lakh crore in the next three years for achieving its target of building 1 crore houses.
  • The pace of construction under the urban section of PMAY is too slow. It has completed just over 10% of its target as the scheme reaches its halfway point.
  • Other headwinds include: unavailability of land in prime areas, low participation of private developers on account of brand dilution and bidding mechanism.
  • Also there are issues of stringent cost and time schedules resulting in low yields, increasing construction costs due to absence of bulk sourcing of materials, and lack of new technology that impacts productivity, cost efficiency and quality.
  • Against the validated demand of about one crore housing units to be constructed by the year 2022, the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs has so far sanctioned around 70 lakh houses, out of which around 37 lakh have been grounded and around 15 lakh completed and allotted to beneficiaries.

Way forward:

  • This reality with the Indian real estate should be accounted for the large-scale state-subsidised model for housing projects.
  • It calls for making well-informed and contextualised policies.
  • In situ development: Notably, as of latest data, only 2.2% of the total approved housing under PMAY-HFA was for in situ development.
  • Government can consider increasing this proportion and go for a sustained focus on in situ upgradation.
  • This would alleviate much of the social capital concerns, entail lower costs and address the concern of scarcity of new land.
  • Rental housing is being proposed as a smart, complementary solution to the housing shortage.
  • The National Urban Rental Housing Policy, 2017 is currently awaiting the Cabinet’s approval.
  • An important aspect of rental housing is that it would absorb floating population/seasonal migrants, who might not want to invest in an immovable property.
  • With utilisation of large number of existing vacant houses which do not enter the rental market, rental housing can certainly drive down the land requirement.
  • As a concept, social rental housing needs greater impetus, beyond the commercial purposes rental housing in metropolises.
  • Proper legislation on renting houses and a monitoring procedure are essential for the potential use of vacant houses.
  • Housing policies should thus go beyond hard core infrastructure alone, and address other associated issues for a better insight on the outcomes.

Topic:Appointment to various Constitutional posts, powers, functions and responsibilities of various Constitutional Bodies. Statutory, regulatory and various quasi-judicial bodies.

3) Discuss the role that National Commission for Women in India is able to play to strategize and tackle the problems that women face at both public and private spheres. Give reasons in support of your answer.(250 words)

Indian polity by Laxmikanth

 

Why this question:

The question is from the static portions of the GS paper II polity section.

Key demand of the question:

One must elaborate on the role played by National Commission for Women in India.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

In brief provide for the constitutional provisions related to National Commission for Women in India.

Body:

The question is straightforward and one has to discuss the role that National Commission for Women in India is able to play to strategize and tackle the problems that women face at both public and private spheres.

Take help of recent examples to aid your answer and conclude with its significant role.

Conclusion:

Suggest what more needs to be done.

Introduction:    

National Commission for Women (NCW), established in 1992, is a statutory body established under National Commission for Women Act, 1990. It is apex national level organization of India with the mandate of protecting and promoting the interests of women.

Body:

Role of NCW in India:

  • Investigate and examine all matters relating to the safeguards provided for women under the Constitution and other laws;
  • present to the Central Government, annually and at such other times as the Commission may deem fit, reports upon the working of those safeguard;
  • make in such reports recommendations for the effective implementation of those safeguards for the improving the conditions of women by the Union or any state;
  • review, from time to time, the exiting provisions of the Constitution and other laws affecting women and recommend amendments thereto so as to suggest remedial legislative measures to meet any lacunae, inadequacies or shortcomings in such legislations;
  • take up cases of violation of the provisions of the Constitution and of other laws relating to women with the appropriate authorities;
  • look into complaints and take suo moto notice of matters relating to:
    • deprivation of women’s rights;
    • non-implementation of laws enacted to provide protection to women and also to achieve the objective of equality and development;
    • non-compliance of policy decisions, guidelines or instructions aimed at mitigating hardships and ensuring welfare and providing relief to women, and take up the issues arising out of such matters with appropriate authorities;
  • call for special studies or investigations into specific problems or situations arising out of discrimination and atrocities against women and identify the constraints so as to recommend strategies for their removal;
  • undertake promotional and educational research so as to suggest ways of ensuring due representation of women in all spheres and identify factors responsible for impeding their advancement, such as, lack of access to housing and basic services, inadequate support services and technologies for reducing drudgery and occupational health hazards and for increasing their productivity;
  • participate and advice on the planning process of socio-economic development of women;
  • evaluate the progress of the development of women under the Union and any State;

Challenges faced:

  • NCW can only summon the accused but cannot penalize or punish anyone.
  • NCW’s functions are dependent on the grants offered by the central government. Financial assistance provided to the Commission is very less to cater to its needs.
  • NCW’s members are appointed by the government and the commission does not have power to select its own members.
  • NCW lacks concrete legislative power. It enjoys power only to recommend amendments and submit reports.
  • Often it takes action only of the issues are brought to light. Unreported cases of suppression and oppression are generally ignored by the Commission.
  • NCW has no power to take legal actions against the Internal Complaint Committees which have lackadaisical attitude towards grievance redressal of women facing harassments at workplaces.

Way forward:

  • The ministry of Women and child welfare wants constitutional status for NCW, which currently has no legal powers to summon police officers or witnesses.
  • Functioning of the NCW has to be strengthened and given more powers as part of any effort to strengthen the laws for safety of women at the workplace.
  • NCW must be granted the power of selecting its own members. The members should be chosen without any prejudice and should have fair knowledge of law and understands the society and human behaviour.
  • More awareness has to be created especially among the rural women about the existence of the Commission. The Commission can employ a person at the district level to bring into light the atrocities occurring at the district level.
  • Though the NCW is doing good work for the women in India, the commission address the above mentioned shortcomings and must increase the awareness by conducting country wide campaigns, workshops and consultations.

Topic: Appointment to various Constitutional posts, powers, functions and responsibilities of various Constitutional Bodies. Statutory, regulatory and various quasi-judicial bodies.

4) “For achieving the desired objectives, it is necessary to ensure that the regulatory institutions remain independent and autonomous.” Discuss in the light of the experiences in recent past.(250 words)

 Indian polity by Laxmikanth

Why this question:

The question is based on the recent situations that arose around the regulatory institutions with respect to their autonomy.

Key demand of the question:

One has to explain with relevant examples the issues and concerns around the autonomy of the regulatory institutions.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Bring out the regulatory institutions that were in news recently with the concerns of autonomy.

Body:

Explain why autonomy is needed for clear functioning of such institutions.

Discuss the concerns involved.

Suggest solutions as to what can be done to overcome the issue and quote suitable examples.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:    

Independent regularity authorities (IRAs) are agencies of modern democratic governments, parts of the executive wing with a certain degree of statutory or constitutional autonomy, reporting directly to the legislature. Like the general executive, they are accountable to the legislature and subject to judicial review. It is established by legislative act in order to set standards in a specific field of activity, or operations, in the private sector of the economy and to then implement those standards. E.g.: Reserve Bank of India, Securities and Exchange Board of India, Insurance Regulatory and Development Authority (IRDA), Pension Fund Regulatory and Development Authority etc.

Body:

While regulators enjoy functional independence, they fall within the broad domain of the executive branch of the state, which makes them susceptible to pressure groups and lobbying. Nonetheless, majority of the regulators have been successfully performing the tasks entrusted to them- whether it is RBI & inflation control, SEBI against financial scamsters, CCI against cartelization or TRAI & customer protection.

However, on the other end of the spectrum, FMC failed to prevent the NSEL scam and MCI president was arrested for corruption in granting permission to medical colleges. Hence, much depends on the character and caliber of the personnel serving in an institute, than the statutory powers & autonomy of the institute itself.

Issues with regulatory agencies:

  • Presence of many regulatory bodies causes overlapping of powers. Multiple agencies steer the function of local area governance. District development authorities and local governance institutions. For instance,
    • Controversy between SEBI and IRDAI over Unit Linked Insurance Policy.
    • Education sector- AICTE and UGC.
    • Disagreement between CERC and CCI over the issue of “abuse of dominance” by electricity companies.
    • Environment- Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB) and NGT.
  • Lack of clarity leads to politicization of institutions.
  • Inefficiency in functioning. Wastage of funds, functions and functionaries.
  • Lack of accountability.
  • Regulatory hurdle choking growth of economy.
  • Recommendations made by Regulatory Authorities are rarely implemented.

Measures needed:

  • Regulatory Authorities should be given powers to get their judgements implemented so as to increase their efficiency.
  • The regulators need to become more dynamic in their functioning. This is possible only if they are provided enough autonomy.
  • Parliament by law should clearly define the functions, responsibilities, powers, privileges of Regulatory Authorities.
  • Balancing required between ensuring accountability vs autonomy.
  • The regulatory bodies should be kept out of ambit of any political influence
  • As recommended by Justice SriKrishna panel an oversight body to regulate financial sector apart from the RBI.
  • Recommendations of Punchhi commission for an independent regulator overseeing all regulators.

Conclusion:

In the post-1991 India, majority of the regulators have been successfully carrying out the tasks entrusted to them, and where they’ve failed- the causes range from corrupt individuals & political interference to infrastructural & procedural bottlenecks. To ensure the “minimum government and maximum governance” notion of the government a regulatory convergence is required to avoid biases due to jurisdictional overlap. Hence, the need of the hour is to initiate proactive reforms for their independence, autonomy and capacity building.


Topic:Disaster and disaster management.

6) India being one of the most flood affected nations in the world requires strong and healthy coordination between Centre and States for long term flood management. Analyse.(250 words) 

Financialexpress

 

Why this question:

The article highlights the fact that Floods constitute 52% of all natural disasters in India. Thus the question aims to assess the need and significance of coordination between Centre and States for long term flood management in the country.

Key demand of the question:

One must explain the importance of coordination between Centre and States for long term flood management.

Directive:

AnalyzeWhen asked to analyse, you have to examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them as a whole in a summary.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

In brief quote data suggesting the flood scenario in the country.

Body:

Explain that As per the National Emergency Response Centre (NIDM), 1,614 people were killed and 1.8 million displaced (as on September 25, 2019) in 14 states. Widespread floods have also damaged crops, houses and infrastructure.

India is one of the most flood-affected nations in the world, after Bangladesh. Floods constitute 52% of all natural disasters in India, and the costliest as well, with over 63% of all damages attributed to it. Between 1980 and 2017, 70,901 people were killed, 1,395 million affected, and 56 million houses damaged due to floods.

Discuss the causative factors, suggest what methods are required to overcome them and highlight the importance of healthy relations between centre and state to overcome the same.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:    

In an unnerving reminder of last year’s devastating floods, Kerala’s worst in about 100 years, incessant precipitation has deluged many districts, causing havoc, snapping communication lines and claiming several lives. Rains have battered Karnataka and Maharashtra, too, leaving many dead and several missing. Meanwhile, dramatic visuals from Madhya Pradesh, Rajasthan and Gujarat have revealed widespread distress. Parts of Bihar and Assam are also reeling under torrential rainfall, with a large number of people left battling grim circumstances. As per the National Emergency Response Centre (NIDM), 1,614 people were killed and 1.8 million displaced (as on September 25, 2019) in 14 states. Widespread floods have also damaged crops, houses and infrastructure.

Body:

Flood devastation in India:

  • India is one of the most flood-affected nations in the world, after Bangladesh.
  • Floods constitute 52% of all natural disasters in India, and the costliest as well, with over 63% of all damages attributed to it.
  • Between 1980 and 2017, 70,901 people were killed, 1,395 million affected, and 56 million houses damaged due to floods.
  • The economic losses due to this destruction stood at `3,686,340 million, which translates to 0.43% of GDP.
  • The damages translate to 2.68% of the Centre’s total expenditure every year.
  • The average annual flood damage as a percentage of GSDP is the highest in Himachal Pradesh (2.35%), followed by Andhra Pradesh (1.62%), Odisha (0.9%) and Bihar (0.85%), with the lowest damage in Maharashtra (0.03%).

Measures needed for flood management:

  • Policy measures:
    • State governments should focus on economic development by building flood-resilient infrastructure—monitoring embankments of key flood-prone rivers and improving river connectivity, apart from construction of canals, assumes significance.
    • Suitable techniques and methods should be in place to predict accurate rainfall, especially in low-lying areas, and appropriate rainfall warning systems be installed in vulnerable areas.
    • Long-term flood management requires a healthy coordination between the Centre and states. Unless concerted efforts are undertaken in these areas, the deluge will become a regular event.
  • The dire need is for watershed-based master planning and development legislated guidelines for each major river basin, especially those that impact densely populated settlements.
  • There must be a demarcation of ecologically sensitive zones using existing village survey maps and public participation.
  • There must be clear land use plan for these zones specifying flood plains, protected forest areas, agricultural and plantation zones, with details of the types of crops, building usages permitted and the density of buildings permitted.
  • To compensate owners in non-buildable areas, there must be strategies such as Transfer of Development Rights to buildable zones in cities.
  • The master plan should focus on permitting only ecologically sensitive building strategies for these areas by proposing new construction techniques.
  • Controlled development can be proposed using building height rules, floor area ratio control, and restrictions on cutting and filling natural land.
  • Strategies to make sure that all infrastructure projects are carried out in a scientific manner with strict scrutiny must be specified.
  • This should include roads built on difficult terrain and all public infrastructure projects in wetlands and the High Ranges.
  • Copenhagen in Denmark, which faces a similar problem of repeated flooding, has come up with active cloudburst responsive planning as a process to develop the city in line with climate change needs.

Conclusion:

A complete overhaul of processes to hire technical expertise which allows access to necessary skills, and with a long-term vision of capacity building of local agencies, is the way forward. Long-term flood management definitely requires healthy coordination between Centre and states.


Topic: Ethics and Human Interface: Essence, determinants and consequences of Ethics in human actions; dimensions of ethics; ethics in private and public relationships. Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators; role of family, society and educational institutions in inculcating values.

7) In light of rapidly changing societal dynamics, examine the role of educational institutions in shaping the future of children especially when rise in crime among children has lately been observed. (250 words)

 

Why this question:

The article examines the role of educational institutions in shaping the future of children amidst rising crime against them in our society.

Key demand of the question:

One has to bring out the role of educational institutions in shaping the future of children in our society.

Directive:

ExamineWhen asked to ‘Examine’, we must look into the topic (content words) in detail, inspect it, investigate it and establish the key facts and issues related to the topic in question. While doing so we should explain why these facts and issues are important and their implications.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

In brief narrate that the Educational institutions in our society are of considerable importance. They shape the attitude of children and

Prepare them in behaving in a certain manner. They also help children to realize their social goals by inculcation of cultural and social values.

Body:

Discuss first the  changing societal dynamics; nuclear families and

working parents not being able to give enough attention to the children, at a time when social media and technology is burdening the childhood with excess information, importance of schools have become even

More. E.g. – Blue whale game challenge leading children to commit suicide.

Then move on to discuss the role educational institutions play.

Conclusion:

Conclude writing the importance of future of children.

Introduction:    

Education is the architecture of the soul. Nelson Mandela said “Education is the most powerful weapon we can use to change the world” However it is important how it is spread and in what manner. Every Human takes birth as pure heart and pristine spirit/soul. But with time, desire, outside environment, cultural influences, insane practices make human Mephistophelian and eccentric.

Body:

In the recent days, educational institutions have ceased to be temple of values due to:

  • Due to commercialization of education teaching has become a pure profession rather than a passion.
  • Success of a student is being measured only in terms of ranks and grades which is resulting loss of values such as integrity and discipline. Students are forced to adopt any means-moral or immoral to achieve good grades. For example, Bihar board examinations where mass copying was done.
  • It has also caused increased stress in the minds of students which has resulted in unfortunate events like ending the life of another student just to avoid an exam i.e. Gurugram school incident.
  • In order to reduce the expenditure, several schools have outsourced transport and house-keeping to third party which lead to unauthenticated staff entering the premises. This has resulted in sexual assaults and rape of innocent children, especially in national capital and other major cities.
  • Moral vacuum created in the schools and colleges have led to incidents such as drug abuse and intolerance towards fellow classmates.
  • Increasing influence of social media and internet has distanced the hearts of human beings. Team work and compassion have been lost. Students have become insensitive to the problems of self and society at large thus falling prey to games like Blue-Whale challenge.

Implications:

  • On Self: Loss of self-worth and confidence. Bad attributes like greed, jealousy, revenge, violence are cultivated as a result. Though one can be a successful lawyer, engineer or a doctor but one will remain as ethical dwarf without values.
  • On Society: School is a building with four walls with a brighter tomorrow inside. If schools fail to inculcate values, then future generation may be influenced by societal evils. Increase in intolerance, radicalization, gender discrimination and crime may be seen.
  • Trust in the educational institutions is lost.

Role of educational institutions in value education:

  • Education in its aims, curriculum and methods is linked with values. It is through education that society seeks to preserve and promote its cherished values.
  • Whatever is learnt and imbibed will determine to how students will live out their lives in future.
  • Educational institutions provide a structured environment where children learn values of cooperation, hard work etc.
  • Punctuality, Commitment, Sincerity, Sharing, Caring, Fairness, Helping, Independence, Responsibility, Humility, Pride need to be inculcated in a child.
  • Lessons of Honesty, Social Justice, Sensitising children with empathy towards vulnerable sections of the society.
  • Teaching Gender Equality, Respect for elders, Truthfulness, Tolerance, Peace, Love for nature & mankind, Positive Attitude, Spirituality, Nationalist feelings, Patriotism, Discipline etc.

Conclusion:

“The aim of education is the knowledge, not facts but of values.” –William Ralph. Schools and colleges must ensure that strong value system is in place right from the childhood through timely ethical education. Value education is the first step for a peaceful and happy society.