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SECURE SYNOPSIS: 10 AUGUST 2019


SECURE SYNOPSIS: 10 AUGUST 2019


NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same time gives you extra points in the form of background information.


Topic:   poverty and developmental issues, urbanization, their problems and their remedies.

1) “Poverty has a female face and economic crisis hits women the hardest”, provide for your concurrence with suitable justifications.(250 words)

The hindu

Why this question:

The article captures a dismal picture of the conditions of women in the drought-stricken regions of Maharashtra and the toll that it has been taking especially on the women in the society.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must critically evaluate the relationship between poverty and women and how often the economic crisis hits women the hardest.

Directive:

Justify – here we have to express our knowledge and understanding of the issue and form an overall opinion thereupon using suitable illustrations/case studies.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

State facts of the matter in the question.

Body:

Discussion should include the following: 

The burden of poverty weighs down heavier on girls and women in India than it does on the opposite sex.

Quote various reports that justify this fact like the United Nations report, called “Turning Promises into Action: Gender Equality in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”.

Take cues from the article and quote the case study of Beed in Maharashtra and explain the issues.

Conclusion:

Conclude with what needs to be done to overcome these major challenges prevalent in the Indian society.

Introduction:

Feminization of poverty is the phenomenon that women represent disproportionate percentages of the world’s poor. UNIFEM describes it as “the burden of poverty borne by women, especially in developing countries”.

Body:

Women’s poverty is directly related to the absence of economic opportunities and autonomy, lack of access to economic resources, including credit, land ownership and inheritance, lack of access to education and support services and their minimal participation in the decision-making process. Poverty can also force women into situations in which they are vulnerable to sexual exploitation.

Female face of poverty:

  • Unpaid work done by women across the globe amounts to a staggering $10 trillion a year, which is 43 times the annual turnover of the world’s biggest company Apple, according to an Oxfam study
  • Inequality has ‘female face’ in India, women’s unpaid work worth 3.1% of GDP
  • Women spend 312 minutes per day in urban areas and 291 minutes per day in rural areas on such unpaid care work, it added. In comparison, men spend only 29 minutes in urban and 32 minutes in rural areas on unpaid care work.
  • Although India has many laws that deal with violence against women, but their implementation remains a challenge, including due to a deeply patriarchal society.

Causes:

  • Several factors affect the feminization of poverty, and these factors place women at high risk of poverty.
  • Though low income is the major cause, there are many interrelated facets of this problem.
  • Lone mothers are usually at the highest risk for extreme poverty because their income is insufficient to rear children.
  • It then lowers their children’s possibilities for good education and nourishment.
  • Low income is a consequence of the social bias women face in trying to obtain formal employment, which in turn deepens the cycle of poverty.
  • As the number of women in poverty increases, the diverse causes affecting their poverty must be examined.
  • Poverty is multidimensional, and therefore economic, demographic, and socio-cultural factors all overlap and contribute to the establishment of poverty.
  • It is a phenomenon with multiple root causes and manifestations

Measures needed:

  • Access to an independent and adequate income for all
    • Barriers to employment should be tackled by investment in childcare and adult social care, public transport and flexible and adaptable jobs.
    • Benefits should be designed to ensure that every individual within a household has access to a fair income
    • In addition to collecting data at the household level, statistical authorities (including the ONS and DWP) should collect and publish income data at the individual level.
  • Sharing care responsibilities and care costs more equally – within families and in society
    • Parental and paternity leave should be lengthened and adequately paid to ensure that men can take it. Maternity leave should be paid at the same higher rate.
    • Flexible working should be offered as an immediate right to all employees so that women and men can choose their right balance of work and family responsibilities. Differential use of flexible working by men and women should be monitored, and policies put in place to encourage more equal take up.
    • Investment in child and adult social care should be consistent and adequate to ensure that these services are high quality, affordable and available to all who need it.
  • Sustainable funding for specialist women’s organisations
    • Specialist local women’s organisations should be adequately funded to ensure that all women have access to relevant support.

Conclusion:

Thus, there is a need for a multipronged approach with better choices and decision making for women in terms of inadequate food, housing, education, healthcare, sanitation, poor developmental policies, and more.


Topic:  Salient features of Indian Society, Diversity of India.

2) The “Elder Abuse Study Report-2018” shows the grim condition of the old-aged in the country. How far do you think that modernization is responsible for this condition? Also discuss the steps taken by the government to provide geriatric care.(250 words)

Hindustantimes

Why this question:

The question intends to evaluate the connection between modernization and the elder abuse in the country.

Key demand of the question:

One must discuss the situation of the old-aged population in the country, issues and challenges of elder abuse and what needs to be done to overcome the same.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

State facts from the report and highlight the current problem.

Body:

Explain in what way the advent of technology has adversely impacted the lives of the elderly in the country, contributing to abuse and their feelings of isolation.

Quote that recent surveys have revealed while 73 per cent elders felt their adult children were too busy on the phones even when at home with them, over 60 per cent of them agreed quality time spent with their children and grandchildren has decreased with the increase in usage of phones and computers. Social media, in particular, 78 per cent of the respondents said, had decreased the family time spent together.

Explain what needs to be done? How can these concerns be overcome and suggest solutions.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

The World Health Organization defines Elder abuse as a single or repeated act, or lack of appropriate action, occurring within any relationship where there is an expectation of trust, which causes harm or distress to an older person. According to the 23 city report by HelpAge India released Thursday, the maximum amount of abuse happens in Mangalore (47 per cent), followed by Ahmedabad (46 per cent), Bhopal (39 per cent) and Amritsar (35 per cent).

Body:

This type of violence constitutes a violation of human rights and includes physical, sexual, psychological, and emotional abuse; financial and material abuse; abandonment; neglect; and serious loss of dignity and respect. World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD) is observed every year on 15 June to raise voice for the elders who are abused and suffered.

Modernization and Elderly Abuse:

  • Poor financial status of family: Lower income or poverty has been found to be associated with elder abuse. Low economic resources have been conceptualized as a contextual or situational stressor contributing to elder abuse.
  • Health care costs increase: As older people stop working and their health care needs increase, governments could be overwhelmed by unprecedented costs
  • Lack of space: Living with a large number of household members other than a spouse is associated with an increased risk of abuse, especially financial abuse.
  • interpersonal issues
  • Chronic diseases of older persons: At the individual level, elders who have poor physical and mental health are at higher risk.
  • Elderly women issues: They face life time of gender-based discrimination. The gendered nature of ageing is such that universally, women tend to live longer than men. Social mores inhibit women from re-marrying, resulting in an increased likelihood of women ending up alone.
  • Declining moral value system: At the socio-cultural level, a representation of an older person as weak and dependent, lack of funds to pay for care, elderly people who need assistance but live alone, and destruction of bonds between the generations of a family are possible factors in elder abuse.

Steps taken by Government:

  • Pradhan Mantri Vaya Vandana Yojana
    • The Pradhan Mantri Vaya Vandana Yojana (PNVVY) was launched in May 2017 to provide social security during old age. This is a simplified version of the VPBY and will be implemented by the Life Insurance Corporation (LIC) of India.
    • Under the scheme, on payment of an initial lump sum amount ranging from Rs 1,50,000 for a minimum pension of Rs 1000 per month to a maximum of Rs 7,50,000/- for a maximum pension of Rs 5,000 per month, subscribers will get an assured pension based on a guaranteed rate of return of 8% per annum payable monthly/quarterly/half-yearly/annually.
  • Varishtha Pension Bima Yojana (VPBY)
    • This scheme is run by the Ministry of Finance. The Varishtha Pension Bima Yojana (VPBY) was first launched in 2003 and then relaunched in 2014. Both are social security schemes for senior citizens intended to give an assured minimum pension on a guaranteed minimum return on the subscription amount.
  • Rashtriya Vayoshri Yojana (RVY)
    • This scheme is run by the Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment. This is a central sector scheme funded from the Senior Citizens’ Welfare Fund. The fund was notified in the year 2016. All unclaimed amounts from small savings accounts, PPF and EPF are to be transferred to this fund.
  • Vayoshreshtha Samman
    • Conferred as a National award, and given to eminent senior citizens & institutions under various categories for their contributions on International day of older persons on 1st october.
  • Indira Gandhi National Old Age Pension Scheme (IGNOAPS)
    • The Ministry of Rural Development runs the National Social Assistance Programme (NSAP) that extends social assistance for poor households for the aged, widows, disabled, and in cases of death where the breadwinner has passed away.
  • Integrated Programme for Older Persons (IPOP)
    • Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment is a nodal agency for the welfare of elderly people. The main objective of the scheme is to improve the quality of life of older persons by providing basic amenities like shelter, food, medical care and entertainment opportunities, etc.

Way forward:

  • Public: Watch for signs of elder abuse
  • Older people: staying connected with family and friends, making sure their financial and legal affairs are in order.
  • Family and informal caregivers: lower their risk of committing abuse by getting help from family or friends, by getting support from local health and social services.
  • Health sector: Raise awareness within the health sector and other sectors about the health and social burden of elder abuse; recognize elder abuse as a public health problem
  • Establish a focal point to address elder abuse, develop and test evidence based interventions to prevent elder abuse.
  • Provide services to victims of elder abuse; collaborate with other sectors to address elder abuse, such as criminal justice, health, and social services.
  • Implementation of laws like Maintenance and Welfare of Parents and Senior Citizens Act, 2007 to ensure that the rights of senior citizens are protected.

Conclusion:

The elderly should be seen as a blessing, not a burden. The elderly are becoming the fastest growing, but underutilized resource available to humanity. Rather than putting them aside, physically (and mentally), to be cared for separately, they should be integrated into the lives of communities where they can make a substantial contribution to improving social conditions. The benefits of turning the ‘problem’ of the elderly into a ‘solution’ for other social problems are being demonstrated in several countries like Vietnam, Japan etc.


Topic: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation. Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment

3) How far can the idea of electric vehicles help tackle the air pollution problem in India? Don’t you think it can no longer be tackled with short term, reactive solutions but long term multi-pronged solutions? Critically analyse.(250 words)

Livemint

Why this question:

The question is in the context of discussing Air pollution and its effects on health, environment and economy, need of the hour.

Demand of the question:

The answer must relate the recent moves taken by government such as FAME-II etc. to promote electric vehicle mobility and the impact that it has on air pollution and to what extent it alone can prove to be a good fix, one must evaluate the short term versus long term fixes.

Directive:

Critically analyzeWhen asked to analyse, you have to examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them as a whole in a summary. When ‘critically’ is suffixed or prefixed to a directive, one needs to look at the good and bad of the topic and give a fair judgement.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

In brief discuss the electric vehicle policies that have been recently adopted and promoted by the govt.

Body:

The answer must first discuss the serious issue of air pollution in the country.

Then discuss the context of electric vehicles, the government’s vision to promote it and then with hints and clues from article discuss how this can not be a solution alone and that the problem would require a multi-pronged approach.

Conclusion:

Suggest other solutions and appreciate the efforts of the EV mobility policies at the same time. 

 

Introduction:

Adopting electric vehicles (EVs) could improve overall air quality and lower carbon emissions, according to a study. Researchers from the Northwestern University in the US quantified the differences in air pollution generated from battery-powered electric vehicles versus internal combustion engines.

Body:

E-vehicles address pollution in cities:

  • Direct emissions include smog-forming pollutants(such as nitrogen oxides), other pollutants harmful to human health, and greenhouse gases (GHGs), primarily carbon dioxide.
  • All-electric vehicles produce zero direct emissions, which specifically helps improve air quality in urban areas.
  • Electric vehicles produce fewer emissions that contribute to climate change and smog than conventional vehicles.
  • Reduced Noise Pollution: Electric vehicles put curb on noise pollution as they are much quieter. Electric motors are capable of providing smooth drive with higher acceleration over longer distances.

No, there is more to be done apart from e-Vehicles:

  • 70-95% of PM emissions caused by road transportation is not related to tailpipe emissions but to road dust re-suspension and abrasion of brakes and tyres. E-buses will not eliminate these emissions.
  • Electric power is mainly produced by coal-powered plants. So the switch to electric would neither change the air quality in the city nor would it be an environmentally friendly initiative.
  • The technology is still too expensive primarily because of the battery.
  • Recharge Points: Electric fuelling stations are still in the development stages.
  • Not Suitable for Cities Facing Shortage of Power:As electric cars need power to charge up, cities already facing acute power shortage are not suitable for electric vehicles
  • Newer vehicles require new Industries for manufacturing base. This might cause land pattern change and deforestation.

Measures needed:

  • Three decisive measures need to be taken by the government to impact both pollution and our fossil-fuel import bill positively.
  • By banning all Bharat Stage 3 (BS3) vehicles and below. Scrap them immediately, irrespective of age. In one stroke, close to 40% of all the 300 million vehicles on the roads will be gone.
  • Assure top-notch public transport in India’s top 24 cities. A multi-modal grid of trains, buses, taxis, three-wheelers and two-wheelers could achieve this. Disruptive thought and action would be needed to make the status-conscious Indian adopt public transport as an act of responsibility rather than sacrifice
  • Decongest the 60 top smart cities. They constitute almost 90% of our vehicular population and thus vehicular pollution. We also need to focus on smoother traffic flow, better parking management and pedestrian movement. Decongestion, like road safety, could be adopted as a cause by the government as well as corporate houses.

Way forward:

  • The focus should be on measures which are more sustainable, paired with effective investments to improve air quality.
  • With regards to the expected additional energy demand generated by India’s 2030 vision of electric vehicles, it might make sense to couple this with renewable energy: every electric vehicle sold should require a dedicated clean source of power to be installed.
  • Other ways to spur EVs, include dedicated charging spots, and discounted or free parking.
  • In the Indian scenario, the government should provide the initial user base and demand to help technologies cross the chasm.
  • The government could consider making all new government and corporate vehicles electric.
  • This would force government buildings to install EV infrastructure, and hopefully create a large enough ecosystem for the maintenance market in petrol pumps and service shops to take off.

Topic: Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India’s interests, Indian diaspora. 

4) Do you agree that the recently signed Singapore convention by United Nations will have huge impact on Indian economy in the context of global trade? Elucidate. (250 words)

Financialexpress

Why this question:

 Recently the Union Cabinet has approved the signing of the United Nations Convention on International Settlement Agreements (UNISA) resulting from mediation by the Republic of India scheduled to be held at Singapore on 7th August, 2019.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must discuss the impact of such a deal upon the Indian economy with reference to global trade.

Directive:

ElucidateGive a detailed account as to how and why it occurred, or what is the particular context. You must be defining key terms where ever appropriate, and substantiate with relevant associated facts.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

In brief define the context of the question.

Body:

First discuss about the UNISA, its key features.

Then explain how Signing of the Convention will boost the confidence of the investors and shall provide a positive signal to foreign investors about India’s commitment to adhere to international practice on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) and thus boost trade and economy of the country.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way ahead.

Introduction:

The United Nations General Assembly adopted the United Nations Convention on International Settlement Agreements resulting from mediation (“the Convention”) on 20th December 2018. The convention is also known as the “Singapore Convention on Mediation” (the Convention). India has recently signed the UNISA. So far 46 countries have signed this international treaty on settlement agreements.

Body:

Importance of Mediation:

  • In commercial disputes, mediation often proves to be the cheapest, quickest and the most confidential mode for dispute resolution.
  • Often, corporates find themselves in a situation where they have multiple dealings with one another, and do not wish to spoil the relationship due to a disagreement in a particular transaction.
  • Mediation is the answer as it helps to preserve business relationships.
  • It also affords the parties greater control over the outcome, leading to a more commercially-sound resolution as opposed to a determination through an adjudicatory mechanism.

Shortcomings of Mediation:

  • Mediation, unlike arbitration or court litigation, suffers from a drawback.
  • Mediated settlements typically take shape in the form of a settlement agreement.
  • This is unlike a court judgment or arbitral award, where a party could directly file for execution and/or initiate contempt proceedings.
  • Therefore, mediated settlements would generally be recorded in the form of court orders or consent awards.
  • This leads to unnecessary costs, delays and, in certain cases, to loss of confidentiality.
  • Therefore, there is a need for an international framework to enforce such settlement agreements.

Benefits of Singapore convention for India:

  • It ensures that parties reach a settlement that becomes binding and enforceable in accordance with simplified and streamlined procedure.
  • It aims to become essential instrument that facilitates international trade and in promotion of mediation as alternative and effective method of resolving trade disputes.
  • It also seeks to contribute to strengthening access to justice, and to the rule of law.
  • Signing of the Convention will boost the confidence of the investors and shall provide a positive signal to foreign investors about India’s commitment to adhere to international practice on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR).
  • It is particularly important for the growth of mediation in India and enhancing the ease of doing business in India particularly in the legal front.
  • It will provide positive signal to foreign investors about India’s commitment for adhering to international practice on Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) or external dispute resolution (EDR).

Way forward:

  • To further boost foreign investors’ confidence in the Indian market, the law supporting the convention in India should cover all government contracts with investors for mediation both in India and in a third country choice of disputing parties.
  • India may have to enact a new law on mediation, setting out the process for enforcement.
  • With contract-based businesses set to boost the Indian economy to the USD 5 trillion target, foreign companies would be asking legal groups about their mediation capabilities
  • A number of UN member countries, both the convention signatories and the ones yet to sign, will need domestic laws supporting the mediation agreements within their respective jurisdictions

Conclusion:

The convention is likely to promote the adoption of mediation by the parties in relation to international commercial disputes, as it will make ‘settlement agreements’ independently enforceable. This will promote mediation and could consequently reduce the burden on other forms of dispute resolution procedures.


Topic: Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment

5)  The recently released IPCC report has inferred that reduction in global heating would require transformation of food production and land management, in the light of the above statement discuss the interlinkages of climate change and land management and recommend what needs to be done. (250 words)

Indianexpress

Why this question: 

The article discusses the findings of the recently released IPCC report and its inference.

Demand of the question:

The answer must discuss the interlinkages of climate change and land management and recommend what needs to be done.

Directive word: 

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction

In brief quote the key highlights of the IPCC report.

Body

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change special report on climate change and land, released in Geneva on Thursday, found limiting global heating to below 2 degree Celsius can only be achieved by reducing emissions from all sectors – including land and food.

It finds the climate crisis is affecting all aspects of food security – including availability, price and nutrition – but that coordinated action to cut global emissions could simultaneously improve land resources, food security and nutrition and help to address hunger.

Discuss the aspect of land; Land use has always been part of conversations on climate change and activities like afforestation have held an important place in the fight against global warming.

Suggest solutions as what needs to be done.

Conclusion 

Conclude with significance of the findings and need for urgent action.

Introduction:

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s (IPCC) report on ‘Climate Change and Land’ reveals the relation between climate change and land use pattern. It presents the most recent evidence on how the different uses of land like forests, agriculture, and urbanization are affecting and getting affected by climate change.

Body:

Key findings of report:

  • The report talks about the contribution of land-related activities to global warming.
  • It also talks about the manner in which even existential activities like food production contributes to global warming and is also affected by it.
  • If pre-production and post-production activities are taken into account, food production could contribute as much as 37% of all greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) every year.
  • It points out that nearly 25% of all food produced is either lost or wasted. And even the decomposition of the waste releases emissions.

Linkage between land use and climate change:

  • Land use, and changes in land use, has always been an integral part of the conversation on climate change.
  • That is because land acts as both the source as well as a sink of carbon.
  • Activities like agriculture, cattle rearing, etc are a major source of methane and nitrous oxide, which are more dangerous than CO2.
  • Soil, trees, plantations and forests absorb CO2 for photosynthesis, thus reducing the overall CO2 content in the atmosphere.
  • This is the reason why large-scale land use changes like deforestation, urbanisation or change in cropping pattern, have a direct impact on the overall emissions of greenhouse gases.

Impact on Food security:

  • Climate change is affecting food security through increasing temperatures, changing precipitation patterns, and greater frequency of some extreme events.
  • Agricultural Production: Increasing temperatures are affecting agricultural productivity in higher latitudes, raising yields of some crops (maize, cotton, wheat, sugar beets), while yields of others (maize, wheat, barley) are declining in lower-latitude regions.
  • Nutritional Quality: Increased atmospheric CO2 levels can lower the nutritional quality of crops.
  • Livestock Production: Future climate change could affect livestock production.
  • An increase in desertification and heatwaves could have a direct impact on animal morbidity, mortality and distress that in turn could adversely affect the food security.
  • Higher Prices: Report states that cereal prices could increase by 1-29% by 2050 as a result of climate change, leading to higher food prices and increased risk of food insecurity and hunger

Measures needed:

  • The measures include a major re-evaluation of land use including agricultural practices.
  • Increasing land productivity, wasting less food, changing dietary habits of people from cattle meat to other types of meat.
  • The report notes that, if proper changes to the land use pattern in agriculture and animal is implemented, 2.3 to 9 billion tonnes of CO2 equivalent can be avoided by 2050.
  • Also with changes to the people’s dietary habits CO2 equivalent of 8 billion tonnes can be avoided by 2050.

Conclusion:

India’s action plan on climate change gives due recognition to the above fact. It has a very important component of forests. Under INDCs, India has pledged to create an additional carbon sink of about 2.5 billion to 3 billion tonnes by the year 2032 by increasing its forest cover and planting more trees.


Topic: Ethics and Human Interface: Essence, determinants and consequences of Ethics in human actions; dimensions of ethics; ethics in private and public relationships. Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators; role of family, society and educational institutions in inculcating values.

6) Mention any two unethical practices in society today and suggest a sustainable solution to each.(250 words)

Ethics by Lexicon publications

Why this question:

The question is straight forward and from the static aspects of the syllabus.

Key demand of the question:

One must bring out any 2 unethical practices prevalent in the Indian society.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Discuss the need on ethics.

Body:

There is nothing much to deliberate in such a question, students may choose to write any relevant incidences from day to day life or from personal experiences justifying the unethical practices that they might have witnessed along with suitable solutions to overcome the same.

Conclusion:

Conclude with need of ethics in the society for betterment.

Introduction:

Unethical practices are those which are contrary to our own moral principles as well as the principles admired in the community one lives in. It is an action that falls outside of what is considered morally right or proper for a person, a profession or an industry. Individuals can behave unethically, as can businesses, professionals and politicians.

Body:

Moral principles such as fairness, honesty, dignity, and concern for individual rights are of profound importance.

Here, you can divide the answer under heads and give your own examples and solutions to it. Few examples are added here

Unethical practices among Individuals:

Treating male and female child differently. Practice of untouchability, female genital mutilation etc.

Unethical practices among Businesses:

The case of Volkswagen hiding the emission test results. 

Unethical practices by Professionals:

Doping by athletes to improve performance.

Unethical practices among Politicians and the Government:

Snooping on individuals telephone calls.

Conclusion:

To be unethical in one’s behavior and practices means that one is betraying one’s inner character and eventually experiencing a diminished faith in oneself. Education and Sensitization of the moral values will help individuals to avoid the unethical practices.


Topic:  Ethics and Human Interface: Essence, determinants and consequences of Ethics in human actions; dimensions of ethics; ethics in private and public relationships. Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators; role of family, society and educational institutions in inculcating values.

7) Discuss any five naturally acceptable feelings in human-human relationships.(250 words)

Ethics by Lexicon publications

Key demand of the question:

Explain any five naturally acceptable feelings in human-human relationships.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Discuss the significance of feelings and their importance in human-human relationships.

Body:

One can discuss any key values ranging from trust, respect, affection, care, guidance, reverence, glory, gratitude and love. Explain any five in detail and how these values foster stronger human-human relationship.

Explain how such values foster happiness, quality of life, bring mutual happiness among human-human relationships.

Conclusion:

Conclude with significance of such values.

Introduction:

There are certain basic and important values in maintaining relationship. These values or feelings, we all know, are the backbone of health and happy family relations. The feelings, emotions, sentiments and respect all are of real importance. These values lead to elimination of friction and establishment of total harmony in relationship on long term basis.

Body:

  • Trust: It is the foundational value in relationship. To be assured that each human being inherently wants oneself and the other to be happy and prosperous. If we have trust in the other, we are able to see the other as a relative and not as an adversary.
  • Respect: Respect means individuality. The sense of individuality is prime object. This is the first basic step towards respect. Once we realized that we are individual then only we can see our self different from others. In other words, respect means right evaluation, to be evaluated as I am.
  • Affection: Affection is the feeling of being related to the other. Affection comes when I recognize that we both want to make each other happy and both of us are similar.
  • Care: The feeling of care is the feeling to nurture and protect the body of our relative. Or in other words a state of mind in which one is troubled; worry, anxiety, or concern is called care.
  • Love: Love is the emotion of strong affection and personal attachment. In other words, love is a feeling of warm personal attachment or deep affection, as for a parent, child, or friend. This feeling or value is also called the complete value since this is the feeling of relatedness to all human beings.
  • Gratitude: Gratitude is the feeling of acceptance for those who have made efforts for my excellence. Gratitude is an emotion that occurs after people receive help, depending on how they interpret the situation.
  • Reverence: The feeling of acceptance of excellence in the other is called reverence. When we see that the other has achieved this excellence- which means to understand and to live in harmony at all the levels of living ensuring continuity of happiness, we have a feeling of reverence for him/her.

Conclusion:

The feelings of being related to every human being leads to our participation in an undivided society. By living in relationship in the family, we get the occasion to gain the assurance that the other person is an aid to me and not a hindrance. With the understanding of values in human relationship, we are able to recognize the connectedness with every individual correctly and fulfil it.