Print Friendly, PDF & Email

SECURE SYNOPSIS: 27 JULY 2019


SECURE SYNOPSIS: 27 JULY 2019


NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same time gives you extra points in the form of background information.


Topic: Effect of policies and politics of developed and developing countries on India’s interests, Indian diaspora.

 1) In a climate of uncertainty and open hostility between nations, the Geneva Conventions play an important role in tempering the aggression of war with a touch of compassion. Discuss.(250 words)

Hindustantimes

Why this question: 

The article discusses the significance of Geneva convention in providing for compassion to the individual soldiers who deserve better treatment at the hands of opposition powers.

Demand of the question:

The article must provide for significance of Geneva convention.

Directive word: 

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction

In general, discuss the relevance of the convention.

Body

The question is straightforward and there isn’t much to deliberate, students must take hints from the article and discuss how Geneva convention is a step in the right direction that ensures compassion to the prisoners of war, to individual soldiers.

Conclusion 

Conclude by reasserting importance.

Introduction:

The Geneva Conventions is a body of Public International Law, also known as the Humanitarian Law of Armed Conflicts, whose purpose is to provide minimum protections, standards of humane treatment, and fundamental guarantees of respect to individuals who become victims of armed conflicts.

Body:

The provisions for Prisoners of War:

  • The convention is very exhaustive and deals with every kind of situation that may arise for a captive and captor, including the place of internment, religious needs, recreation, financial resources, the kinds of work that captors can make PoWs do, the treatment of captured officers, and the repatriation of prisoners.
  • Any unlawful act or omission by the Detaining Power causing death or seriously endangering the health of a prisoner of war in its custody is prohibited and will be regarded as a serious breach of the present Convention.
  • In particular, no prisoner of war may be subjected to physical mutilation or to medical or scientific experiments of any kind which are not justified by the medical, dental or hospital treatment of the prisoner concerned and carried out in his interest.
  • Likewise, prisoners of war must at all times be protected, particularly against acts of violence or intimidation and against insults and public curiosity.

Importance of Geneva Conventions in today’s world of uncertainty:

  • The Geneva Convention reminds us to look at the individual even in spaces such as war between nations.
  • The agreement set down the rules for the treatment of prisoners taken in a war situation, explicitly putting down that prisoners of war (POWs) would be prisoners of the Power which holds them, and not of the unit that had captured them; and that they must be treated with honour, and allowed to live in humane conditions.
  • The protocol also established that prisoners of war need only truthfully give their names and ranks, and that they cannot be coerced to reveal other details about themselves or the operations they have been involved in.
  • All these caveats are to establish the individual as the linchpin of humanity.
  • The Geneva Conventions that originally only addressed the treatment of combatants was later expanded to include non-combatants and civilians as well.

Conclusion:

How one treats those who stand in opposition to that which we hold dear — be it our country, a cause, or a faith — will always be an important defining characteristic of a nation, a people, and even individuals. In a world where the treatments of immigrants and refugees is one of the bigger problems we all face, it is a good time to remember that we are honour-bound to extend compassion and dignity to everyone — even those we may be ready to kill.


Topic:Indian Economy and issues relating to planning, mobilization of resources, growth, development and employment.

 2) Provide for an analysis of recently released Global Innovation Index, Discuss the need for innovation and government efforts to promote the same. (250 words)

The hindu

Why this question:

Global Innovation Index 2019 has been released recently.

Key demand of the question:

The question aims to analyse the recently released Global innovation index and the performance made by our country and the efforts of the government in this direction.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Discuss in brief about GII.

Body:

Start with brief on findings of the report.

Discuss the salient features of the report – GII rankings are based on 80 indicators, from traditional measurements like research and development investments and international patent and trademark applications.

Theme for the year 2019 is – Creating Healthy Lives – The Future of Medical Innovation, which aims to explore the role of medical innovation as it shapes the future of healthcare.

It is published by a specialized agency of the United Nations – the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) in association with Cornell University and graduate business school INSEAD.

Then list upon the performance of India and the key findings of the government initiatives in this direction.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

The Government of India has launched the Global Innovation Index (GII) in New Delhi. This is the first time that the GII is being launched in an emerging economy. The Department for Promotion of Industry and Internal Trade (DPIIT) of Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Government of India, World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) are co hosting the event. India has jumped five places to rank 52 in the Global Innovation Index 2019, up from the 57 it had in last year’s rankings.

Body:

Key Findings of Global Innovation Index 2019:

  • Public R&D expenditures, particularly in some high-income countries, are growing slowly or not at all.
  • Global landscape of science, innovation, and technology has undergone important shifts over the last decades.
  • Asian economies especially middle-income one, are rapidly contributing to global research and development (R&D) and international patenting rates via WIPO’s International Patent System.

Need for innovation in India:

  • Key drivers of economic performance and social well-being.
  • It is important to inculcate scientific temper among masses in order to fight superstitions, distorted truth and religious fanaticism that has been crippling India
  • Innovation and technological improvement has become essential to combat and adapt to climate change and promote sustainable development,
  • It is imperative for combating national security threats ranging from cyber ware to autonomous military systems such as drones.
  • Investing in research and providing adequate incentives leads to creation of jobs, especially for the pool of engineers and researchers in the society. Under the ‘Make in India’ program, the government has targeted to create 100 million jobs from the manufacturing sector by 2022.

Government Efforts:

  • Various schemes have been introduced to improve the quality of research institutes, for the promotion of technology business incubators (Atal Incubation Centres) and research parks that promote innovative ideas until they become commercial ventures.
  • PM fellowship scheme aimed at encouraging young, talented, enthusiastic and result-oriented scholars to take up industry-relevant research.
  • Ucchatar Avishkar Yojana: It aims to promote industry-specific need-based research so as to keep up the competitiveness of the Indian industry in the global market.
  • Atal Tinkering Labs ensure that dedicated workspaces are created for students to innovate and develop ideas that will go on to transform India.
  • Platforms like “Innovate India” promote and recognise innovations happening across the nation by enabling citizens to share their innovation.
  • Unnat Bharat Abhiyan 2.0 to help bring transformational change in rural development processes by leveraging knowledge institutions to help build the architecture of an Inclusive India.
  • IMPRINT India is aimed at adopting engineering and technology as the vehicle to addressing the societal needs and achieving national prosperity
  • Forging technology and innovation partnerships with other nations like India-Israel Innovation Bridge will act as link between start-ups of India and Israel.
  • PRISM (Promoting Innovations in Individuals, Start-ups and MSMEs): It is a scheme launched by DSIR (Department of Science & Industrial Research) to support individual innovators with financial grants.
  • Various enabling policies like Science, Technology & Innovation Policy 2013, National Intellectual Property Rights Policy, Technology Vision Document 2035 and Space Vision India 2025 have been framed.

Way forward:

  • The Economic Survey recommends doubling national expenditures on R&D with most of the increase coming from the private sector and universities.
  • Improve math and cognitive skills at school level
  • There is a need to encourage investor-led research. In this direction, the Science and Engineering Research Board (SERB) has already been established. It is a promising start that needs to expand with more resources and creative governance structures.
  • R & D should focus on technology and extension services that is directly related to common people
  • Engage private sector, state government and Indian Diaspora.
  • The private sector should be incentivised to undertake and support R&D through CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) funds.
  • Growing strength of India’s economy and increasing anti-immigrant atmosphere in some Western countries has the potential to attract back scientific Indian Diaspora. Schemes like Ramanujan Fellowship Scheme, the Innovation in Science Pursuit for Inspired Research (INSPIRE) Faculty scheme and the Ramalingaswami Re-entry Fellowship, Visiting Advanced Joint Research Faculty Scheme (VAJRA) should be enhanced to leverage the scientific Diaspora

Topic:  Indian Economy and issues relating to planning, mobilization of resources, growth, development and employment.

3) Practice of Information, technology and communication in agriculture can achieve the triad of empowerment, enablement and expansion. comment.(250 words)

Indian economy by Dutta and Sundaram

Why this question:

 From the perspective of socio-economic and sustainability of the agricultural system, Information can be a valuable tool, in a sense that it’s immaterial, so if we harness the information technology, we can produce more food with less input.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must bring out the significance of ICT in agriculture.

Directive:

Commenthere we have to express our knowledge and understanding of the issue and form an overall opinion thereupon.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Body:

The relevance of ICT for Agricultural Development in general and for Agricultural empowerment and enablement in particular is extremely high for a country like India. E-agriculture involves the conceptualization, design, development, evaluation and application of innovative ways to use information and communication technologies in the rural domain, with a primary focus on agriculture.  

Conclusion:

Technological empowerment is essential for evergreen revolution and E-agriculture has the potential to put India on the higher pedestal of ’Second Green Revolution’ by making Indian agricultural sector self-sufficient. However, digital agricultural interventions need to be pro-poor i.e. technology should be economical and affordable in adoption and implementation.

Introduction:

Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is used as an overarching term incorporating all modes of transmission like electronic devices, networks, mobiles, services and applications which help to disseminate information with the help of technology. In the recent years, ICT has proved to be extremely beneficial for farmers including small land holders, marginalized and poor farmers, and helped them in marketing, precision farming and improved profits.

Body:

Role of ICT in Agriculture:

In the context of agriculture, the potential of information technology (IT) can be assessed broadly under two heads:

  • as a tool for direct contribution to agricultural productivity
  • As an indirect tool for empowering farmers to take informed and quality decisions which will have positive impact on the way agriculture and allied activities are conducted.

Direct benefits:

Precision farming, popular in developed countries, extensively uses ICT to make direct contribution to agricultural productivity. The techniques of remote sensing using satellite technologies, geographical information systems, agronomy and soil sciences are used to increase the agricultural output. This approach is capital intensive and useful where large tracts of land are involved. Consequently it is more suitable for farming taken up on corporate lines.

The indirect benefits of ICT

  • It empowers Indian farmer in significant way and remains to be exploited. The Indian farmer urgently requires timely and reliable sources of information inputs for taking decisions.
  • Access to technology is one of the most important enablers for smallholders to improve productivity sustainably. Innovative mechanisms for technology transfer are required to bring relevant tools, knowledge and knowhow to farmers.
  • Market linkages are common weak points between the smallholders and formal supply chains. Intermediaries are required not only to aggregate production from small-scale growers, but also to provide support and services to ensure the quality and consistency of production.
  • ICT applications can foster dissemination of information on technology, market demand and price information; weather, pest, and risk-management information, best practices to meet quality and certification standards.
  • To bridge the information gap between the farmers and to build productive and competitive market, different ICT interventions support rural and under-developed markets to become efficient and productive.
  • The rapid changes in the field of information technology make it possible to develop and disseminate required electronic services to rural India. The existing bottlenecks in undertaking the tasks need to be addressed immediately.

Challenges in spread of e-technology to farmers:

Mobile Connectivity:

  • Even the masses have access to mobile connectivity, but the potential of the handsets are not yet tapped. This is largely because of the content delivered is often not directly related to their livelihood and environment. Since they need localised news and information directly delivered in their language to meet their daily needs.
  • Affordability is a key issue for many potential users. Not everyone can afford handsets; innovative business models adopted by the firms and handsets at low price tag which work for voice and sms based services.
  • Other challenge in disseminating agriculture related information is dynamic nature of information. Farming is not so linear but requires constant inputs at every stage where new technological inputs provide better crop outputs.

Internet Connectivity:

  • Haphazard development:
    • It is observed that some initiatives have already been made to provide IT based services to farmers. However, duplication of efforts are witnessed as most of the services revolve around limited subjects.
    • Keeping in view the giant task involved, it is necessary to form a coordination mechanism to strive for a concerted effort to support farming community in the country. Such a coordination agency may only have advisory powers.
  • User friendliness:
    • The success of the strategy depends on the ease with which rural population can use the content.
    • This will require easy language, training to farmers and intuitive graphics based presentation.
  • Local languages:
    • Regional language fonts and mechanisms for synchronisation of the content provides a challenge that needs to be met with careful planning
  • Restrictions:
    • Information content based on remote sensing and geographical information systems can provide timely alerts to the farmers and also improve the efficiency of administration.
  • Power Supply:
    • In most of the rural India, power supply is not available for long hours. This will reduce the usefulness of the intended services.
    • Since almost entire country receives sunshine for most part of the year, it is useful to explore solar power packs for UPS as well as for supply of power.
  • Connectivity:
    • Despite the phenomenal progress made in the recent years, the connectivity to rural areas still requires to be improved.
    • Reliable connectivity is a prerequisite for a successful penetration of IT into rural areas.

In India ICT applications such as Warana, Dristee, E-Chaupal, E-Seva, Lokmitra, E-Post, Gramdoot, Dyandoot, Tarahaat, Dhan,Akshaya, Honeybee, Praja are quite successful in achieving their objectives

Conclusion:

The use of ICT in agriculture has grown rapidly in the past few years. It is increasingly being used to help managers make better decisions. However, IT and the problem facing decision makers are constantly changing. Thus, future information systems for research purposes will be significantly different than current systems because of these changes. IT has been one of the most aspired fields in today’s world. Integrating IT with agriculture will help any country to regulate its overall economy and trade.


Topic:  Disaster and disaster management.

4) In a large and diverse country like India, authorities are regularly confronted with large-scale protests, riots; incidents of mass civil disorder and crowd disasters. While keeping in focus the NDMA guidelines on Crowd Disaster Management, discuss the various issues faced by government.(250 words)

Reference

Why this question:

The question aims to analyse the disaster management in crowds and various issues faced by the government in dealing with the same.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must analyse what is crowd disaster management and provide for relevant discussions.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Describe what is crowd disaster management. 

Body:

The discussion must cover the following aspects:

What are the different types of disasters associated with crowd ranging from stampede, fire incidences, floods etc.

Discuss the causes and consequences, suggest the framework provided by NDMA for crowd disaster management.

Conclusion:

Conclude with need for following best practices and rules and regulations in place.

Introduction:

Poor crowd management mechanism in India has lead to many unprecedented tragedies in India. From religious shrines to railway stations- frequent incidents of human stampedes are an unfortunate reality of Indian life.

Body:

National Guide on Crowd Management-NDMA: In view of the recurring stampedes at places of mass gathering, including religious places, and typically ad-hoc responses to those, the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) had prepared ‘Suggestive Framework for Preparation of Crowd Management Plan for Events/Venues of Mass Gathering’.

Issues faced by Government:

  • Governance and accountability: There are lots of provisions in existing acts and rules for effective crowd management. However, enforcement and implementation are the key challenges faced by the administrator and law enforcement agencies. g.: Dabwali fire tragedy and Uphaar Cinema Tragedy are the typical examples of lackadaisical approach to crowd safety.
  • Poor infrastructure: Lack of sufficient manpower in permit granting bodies, political pressure. Deployment of untrained security personnel in order to save cost.
  • No crowd management plan: A major issue highlighted by recurring stampedes is the poor crowd management by concerned authorities. The state governments and local authorities have not yet implemented the NDMA guidelines on crowd management.
  • Rising population: With rising population and rapid urbanization, urban areas are likely to be more susceptible along with places of frequent mass gatherings like temples.
  • Tolerance to crowd: According to scholar Teresa Moore, large-scale events in India are more susceptible to stampedes because of a greater tolerance for high-density crowds. The higher tolerance for crowded places in India allows for more people to get closer, because they don’t feel uncomfortable until it’s very packed.

Measures needed: Some salient points from the NDMA guidelines are as follows:

  • Crowd Queues: Initial focus should be on traffic regulations around the mass gathering venues. There should be a route map for venues along with emergency exits route maps. Also, there should be Barricade facility to control the movement of crowd queues. In case of large crowd gathering, there should be snake line approach, along with constant monitoring of crowds for developing hazard points.
  • VIPs: There should be specific plans to handle VIPs and if VIPs add the security concerns then authorities should refuse entry to VIPs.
  • Communications: There should be CCTV surveillance, along with another public address system, such as loudspeakers should be installed at all crowded points, in order to communicate with the crowds.
  • Medical facilities: Ambulance and health care professionals should be available on venues. NDMA has recommended the medical first-aid rooms and emergency operations in order to handle post-disaster emergencies.
  • Basic facilities: The venue Organisers should ensure authorised use of electricity, fire safety extinguishers and other arrangements as per the safety guidelines.
  • Civil society: Police authorities should access the preparedness. Also, Event/venue managers should involve NGOs and civil society in traffic control, medical assistance and mobilization of local resources in case of disaster.
  • Capacity building: In order to be proactive, there is need to focus on the capacity building. Also, the training manual should be periodically in order to usher in new crowd management technique. Apart from that if there is issue of insufficient Security personnel, students, NGOs and civil society should be roped in. Also, the media should be trained to manage communications during crowd disasters.
  • Use of technology: Smart phones have been used to detect crowd dynamics such as pedestrian flows and bottlenecks, and social groups. Event/venue managers should get liability insurance for their visitors. Example, Shri Maa Vaishnodevi Shrine Board has insurance cover against any accidental casualty for visitors.
  • Awareness Generation Campaign: A campaign to educate the public that railway tracks cannot be treated as commons, and vigorous enforcement, will reduce the probability of train related disasters like the Amritsar case.

Conclusion:

In most of the cases, the crowd disasters are man-made disasters and such tragedies can be prevented with proactive planning and execution by the authorities involved. Apart from that lessons should be learnt from past mistakes. Every member of society is the stakeholder in such disaster prevention. NDMA should also focus on a central repository of incidences so that lessons can be learnt from past.


Topic: Disaster and disaster management.

5) Evaluate the relationship between Disaster and Development. To what extent this relationship is significant to policy makers? Discuss.(250 words)

 

Why this question:

The question seeks to evaluate the relationship between development and disasters.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must discuss the relationship between development and disasters and its significance to policy makers.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

EvaluateWhen you are asked to evaluate, you have to pass a sound judgement about the truth of the given statement in the question or the topic based on evidences.  You have to appraise the worth of the statement in question. There is scope for forming a personal opinion here.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin with brief that Development schemes can both increase and decrease vulnerability. In the traditional approach to disasters, the attitude was that the disasters, especially natural ones, were an act of god and as such were beyond human control; accepting death and damage to property was part of the costs.

Body:

Discussion should include the following: 

What is the relationship between disaster and development?

How is development linked with disaster?

What is development disaster management?

What is disaster development nexus?

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

A disaster is an unforeseen event, which can overwhelm the capacity of the affected people to manage its impact. Disaster management efforts aim to reduce or avoid the potential losses from hazards, assure prompt and appropriate assistance to the victims of a disaster, and achieve a rapid and effective recovery.

Body:

 

 

Disasters and development are closely linked. Disasters can both destroy development initiatives and create development opportunities. Development schemes can both increase and decrease vulnerability.

Disaster-Development

 Economic DevelopmentSocial Development
Disaster limits developmentDestruction of fixed assets. Damage to       transport,       communication,       infrastructure. Erosion of          livelihood.Destruction     of     health     or     education    infrastructure    and    personnel.  Death,  migration  of  key  social  actors  leading  to  an  erosion of social capital.
Development causes       disaster riskUnstable development practices that create   wealth   for   some   at   the   expense of unsafe working or living conditions for others or degrade the environment.Development   path   generating   cultural   norms   that   promote   social    isolation    or    political    exclusion.
Development reduces      disaster riskAccess  to  adequate  drinking  water,  food,   waste   management   and   a   secure  dwelling  increases  people’s  resilience.   Trade   and   technology   can   reduce   poverty.   Investing   in   financial   mechanisms   and   social   security     can     cushion     against     vulnerability.Building  community  cohesion,  recognising excluded   individuals   or   social   groups,   and  providing  opportunities  for  greater         involvement         in         decision-making,         enhanced  educational  and  health  capacity  increases resilience.

 

Nations increase their capacities and decrease their vulnerabilities through development. Development planning is used by governments to draft plans to guide economic and social development. The concept of sustainable development is widely recognized by international agencies and by governments, although its definition is not universally agreed upon. Sustainable development is the outcome of comprehensive planning that incorporates considerations of disaster risk (reducing hazards and vulnerability) as well as strategies designed to protect the environment and to improve economic growth, levels of education, and living conditions of the entire population

The Sendai Framework for disaster reduction also focuses on development of Disaster Resilient Infrastructure, reducing the disaster risk, Building back better.

Conclusion:

The holistic approach to integrating disaster with development has been emphasized and practiced by policymakers and public managers of local communities. Disasters can be seen as a “window of opportunity” for development and well-planned development can certainly reduce impacts of disasters.

Case Study: Disasters can provide unique windows of opportunity in development. In the wake of the 1986 earthquake in El Salvador, the health sector took advantage of the severe damage to the large Children’s Hospital to restructure and decentralize services so that the nation would not be dependent on the services of one “megahospital.”

The El Salvador earthquake also had extreme social and developmental consequences: scarcity of housing, high unemployment (26-35%), and a reduced capacity in public health facilities. Hurricane Joan, which ravaged the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua in 1988, also had serious effects on an already failing economy during a difficult political and economic period.


Topic: Morality

6) Ancient texts and scriptures tell us a lot about administration, bring out few findings where reference to morality in these texts have been evidently made. (250 words)

Ethics by Lexicon publications

Why this question:

The question is direct and aims to analyse the possible references to morality that have been made in the ancient scriptures about administration.

Key demand of the question:

Explain in detail the relevance of ancient texts and scriptures and the lessons of morality that they carry with them.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Briefly define what is morality.

Body:

Explain that references for administration can be found in Atharva Veda, epics like Mahabharata and Ramayana, Silapaddikaran, Arthashastra and Manusmriti. The most details account, however, is from Arthashastra.

Then delve into the morality aspects and administration aspects that these ancient scriptures tell us . quote relevant examples wherever possible.

Conclusion:

Conclude by reasserting significance.

Introduction:

History  of  Indian  administration traces  its  earliest  known  form  to  the monarchical  system. India has a rich tradition of literature that deals with a wide range of subjects from administration, religion to daily activities.

Body:

A lot of information regarding the organisation and   functions   of   Indian   administration   is   obtained   from Vedic   literature, Buddhist    treatises,    and Jain literature, Dharmasastras, Indian Puranas, Ramayana, Mahabharata, Manu Smriti, Sukra Niti and Arthashastra.

  • Emphasis on duties: Text like Mahabharata lists duties of king, ministers and people.
  • System of administration: Even though a monarchy, a well-defined administrative structure with delineation of duties for priests, treasurers, spies, etc. was maintained.
  • Decentralisation: Village sabhas and samitis were the base of administration.
  • State and its functions: In Kautilya’s Arthashastra is obtained a detailed account about the offices of the state.
  • Justice system: Corruption, theft or other criminal acts were severely punished.

References to morality:

  • Justice: King was called the fountain of justice, who ensures justice to everyone owing to his wisdom. Good governance was conceptualized as ‘Ram Rajya’.
  • Integrity: Arthashastra talks about how carefully every officer was selected so as to ensure there is no corruption.
  • Freedom: Decentralisation, role of state as a protector of subjects hints about the freedom people used to enjoy.
  • Compassion: Kautilya in Arthashastra urged the rulers to remain compassionate to their subjects.
  • Objectivity: All major decisions like public appointments, awarding contracts etc. were taken based on merit.
  • Accountability: The head of public office were held accountable for their actions, though being a monarchy the system was different than what we see today.

Conclusion

Ancient treatises based administration on morality. Every action was judged through the prism of good or bad, thus ensuring good governance and welfare of the public.


Topic:  Public/Civil service values and Ethics in Public administration: Status and problems; ethical concerns and dilemmas in government and private institutions; laws, rules, regulations and conscience as sources of ethical guidance; accountability and ethical governance; strengthening of ethical and moral values in governance; ethical issues in international relations and funding; corporate governance.

7) In your opinion do you think a civil servant should be concerned with his public image? Critically Analyse(250 words)

Ethics by Lexicon publications

 

Why this question:

The question seeks to examine the factor of preserving public image for a civil servant.

Key demand of the question:

Explain in what way public image of a civil servant is important for one to profess his responsibilities in the right manner.

Directive:

Critically analyzeWhen asked to analyse, you have to examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them as a whole in a summary. When ‘critically’ is suffixed or prefixed to a directive, one needs to look at the good and bad of the topic and give a fair judgement.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Explain what is meant by public image.

Body:

The answer should discuss why public image is important, what are the concerns involved. Explain in what way Making a public image can help the civil servants dispel the negative apprehensions the people have towards them. List down the possible significant factors.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

A recent news report published in The Hindu (March 27, 2019) wherein a report, published jointly by Azim Premji University and Lokniti, was quoted. In this report it was clearly brought out that the citizen of the country had greater trust in the office of the Collector (manned by the IAS officers) than even the President and the Prime Minister. The evidence stated here shows the public image of a civil servant in the society.

Body:

Need for concerns about public image of civil servant:

  • This increases the public trust on the civil servants.
  • In increases the approachability of the civil servant.
  • It in turn upholds the public image of the institution in which the civil servant is working.
  • Better enforcement of law and order and harmony in society.
  • Reduces corruption

However, public image should not be sole concern:

  • This could lead to policy inaction as the civil servant might fear damage to his public image.
  • As leaders, civil servants do need to take certain unpopular and tough decisions to uphold the rule of law.
  • Extreme consciousness about Public image could lead to nepotism, favouritism which upholds subjectivity.

Conclusion:

A civil servant has to work with anonymity especially in today’s age of social media. It increases the permanence and strength, which are imperative qualities of civil service. Public image is necessary in terms of the deeds done and the institution level and not at personal level.