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SECURE SYNOPSIS: 24 JULY 2019


SECURE SYNOPSIS: 24 JULY 2019


NOTE: Please remember that following ‘answers’ are NOT ‘model answers’. They are NOT synopsis too if we go by definition of the term. What we are providing is content that both meets demand of the question and at the same time gives you extra points in the form of background information.


Topic: Parliament and State Legislatures – structure, functioning, conduct of business, powers & privileges and issues arising out of these.

1) What are parliamentary standing committees? Why are they necessary? Discuss their roles and functions to bring out their significance. (250 words)

The hindu

Why this question:

Eleven of the 22 Bills introduced in the ongoing session of Parliament have been passed, which makes it a highly productive session after many years. But these Bills have been passed without scrutiny by parliamentary standing committees, their purpose being to enable detailed consideration of a piece of legislation.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must discuss importance of parliamentary standing committees, their key functions, roles and responsibilities and justify their significance.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Define what are parliamentary committees.

Body:

Discuss in detail the following points: 

What are Parliamentary standing committees? Their purposes?

Explain why is it in news – After the formation of the 17th Lok Sabha, parliamentary standing committees have not been constituted as consultations among parties are still under way. Partly as a result of this, the Bills were passed without committee scrutiny. They were discussed in Parliament over durations ranging between two and five hours.

Discuss the role and significance of parliamentary standing committees.

Conclusion:

Conclude with their importance.

Introduction:

In the Indian Parliament, a Standing committee is a committee consisting of Members of Parliament. It is a permanent and regular committee which is constituted from time to time according to the provisions of an Act of Parliament or Rules of Procedure and Conduct of Business. Both houses of Parliament, Rajya Sabha, and Lok Sabha have similar Committee structures with a few exceptions. Parliamentary committees draw their authority from Article 105 (on privileges of Parliament members) and Article 118 (on Parliament’s authority to make rules for regulating its procedure and conduct of business).

Body:

Current Issue:

  • Eleven of the 22 Bills introduced in the ongoing session of Parliament have been passed, which makes it a highly productive session after many years.
  • But these Bills have been passed without scrutiny by parliamentary standing committees, their purpose being to enable detailed consideration of a piece of legislation.
  • After the formation of the 17th Lok Sabha, parliamentary standing committees have not been constituted as consultations among parties are still under way.
  • Partly as a result of this, the Bills were passed without committee scrutiny. They were discussed in Parliament over durations ranging between two and five hours.

Necessity for Parliamentary Standing Committees:

  • Parliament is the embodiment of the people’s will. Committees are an instrument of Parliament for its own effective functioning.
  • Committees are platforms for threadbare discussion on a proposed law.
  • The smaller cohort of lawmakers, assembled on the basis of the proportional strength of individual parties and interests and expertise of individual lawmakers, could have more open, intensive and better-informed discussions.
  • Committee meetings are ‘closed door’ and members are not bound by party whips, which allows them the latitude for a more meaningful exchange of views as against discussions in full and open Houses where grandstanding and party positions invariably take precedence.
  • Members of Parliament may have great acumen but they would require the assistance of experts in dealing with such situations. It is through committees that such expertise is drawn into lawmaking.
  • Executive accountability to the legislature is enforced through questions in Parliament also, which are answered by ministers. However, department standing committees go one step further and hear from senior officials of the government in a closed setting, allowing for more detailed discussions.
  • This mechanism also enables parliamentarians to understand the executive processes closely.

Role of committees:

  • Support Parliament’s work.
  • Examine ministerial budgets, consider Demands for Grants, analyse legislation and scrutinise the government’s working.
  • Examine Bills referred to by the Chairman, Rajya Sabha or the Speaker, Lok Sabha.
  • Consideration of Annual Reports.
  • Consideration of national basic long term policy documents presented to the House and referred to the Committee by the Chairman, Rajya Sabha or the Speaker, Lok Sabha.

Way forward:

  • Parliamentary committees don’t have dedicated subject-wise research support available. The knowledge gap is partially bridged by expert testimony from government and other stakeholders.
  • Their work could be made more effective if the committees had full-time, sector-specific research staff.
  • The national commission to review the working of the Constitution has recommended that in order to strengthen the committee system, research support should be made available to them.
  • Currently, the rules of Parliament don’t require every bill to be referred to a parliamentary committee for scrutiny. While this allows the government greater flexibility and the ability to speed up legislative business, it comes at the cost of ineffective scrutiny by the highest law-making body.
  • Mandatory scrutiny of all bills by parliamentary committees would ensure better planning of legislative business.

Conclusion:

Thus, the PSC act as check and balance which must be constituted at the earliest.


Topic: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation.

2) The recent amendments to the RTI Act passed in the Lok Sabha have drawn criticism from the Opposition and a large section of the civil society. In such a scenario critically analyse the amendments made to the act and their effects thereon.(250 words)

Indianexpress

Why this question: 

The bill introduces changes in the terms and conditions of appointment of the chief information commissioner (CIC) at the Centre and the information commissioners in states. The RTI amendment bill has three provisions that have been challenged by the Opposition members in Parliament and by activists working in the field.

Demand of the question:

The answer must provide for detailed critical analysis of the recent amendments made to the act and in what way the associated concerns can be resolved.

Directive word: 

Critically analyzeWhen asked to analyse, you have to examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them as a whole in a summary. When ‘critically’ is suffixed or prefixed to a directive, one needs to look at the good and bad of the topic and give a fair judgement.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction

In brief explain the basic things that the RTI Act of 2005 does.

Body

Explain precisely the specific amendments made – In the 2019 RTI amendment bill, the government has done away with the fixed tenure of five years for the chief information commissioners and the information commissioners. Their salaries too have been altered. Both will now be separately notified by the government of the day.

This, in a political sense, means that the government can threaten or lure the chief information commissioner and information commissioners with arbitrary removal or extension and curtailment or increase in salary depending upon their suitability for the ruling dispensation.

Suggest what needs to be done to overcome these concerns.

Conclusion 

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

The Right to Information (RTI) Act, operationalised in October 2005, was seen as a powerful tool for citizen empowerment. Democracy requires an informed citizenry and transparency of information which are vital to its functioning and also to contain corruption and to hold governments and their instrumentalities accountable to the governed.  It showed an early promise by exposing wrongdoings at high places and bringing to limelight various scams.

The Right to Information (Amendment) Bill, 2019 that amends the Right to Information Act, 2005 has been introduced in Lok Sabha. However, former information commissioners and RTI activists have come out strongly against the move by the central government to amend the RTI Act, 2005.

Body:

Amendments:

  • The Bill primarily amends Sections 13 and 16 of the Right to Information (RTI) Act, 2005.
  • The Centre shall have the powers to set the salaries and service conditions of Information Commissioners at central as well as state levels.
  • Term of the central Chief Information Commissioner and Information Commissioners: appointment will be “for such term as may be prescribed by the Central Government”.
  • While the original Act prescribes salaries, allowances and other terms of service of the state Chief Information Commissioner as “the same as that of an Election Commissioner”, and the salaries and other terms of service of the State Information Commissioners as “the same as that of the Chief Secretary to the State Government”, the amendment proposes that these “shall be such as may be prescribed by the Central Government”.

Reasons for opposition:

  • The original Act had quantified the tenures, and defined the salaries in terms of existing benchmarks. The amendments are being viewed as implying that, in effect, the terms of appointment, salaries and tenures of the Chief Information Commissioners and Information Commissioners can be decided on a case-to-case basis by the government. This will take away the independence of the RTI authorities.
  • Therefore, the Bill is being seen as a “threat to the independence” of the Central Information Commissioner.
  • By diminishing the status of the CIC, IC and State CIC from that of a Supreme Court judge would reduce their ability to issue directives to senior government functionaries.
  • The amendments would empower the Centre to make rules to decide the tenure, salary, allowances and other terms of service of information commissioners of the Central and also State Information Commissions.
  • This will fundamentally weaken the institution of the information commissions as it will adversely impact the ability of commissioners to function in an independent manner.
  • The separation of powers is a concept which underscores independence and is vital to India’s democratic checks and balances.
  • The Commission which is vested by law with status, independence and authority, will now function like a department of the Central government.
  • When power is centralised and the freedom of expression threatened, it affects the fundamental federal fabric.
  • The government has brought about the Bill in complete secrecy and there have been no public consultations on the Bill, which will impact the fundamental right to information of the citizens of the country.

Government’s rationale:

  • The mandate of Election Commission of India and Central and State Information Commissions are different.
  • Hence, their status and service conditions need to be rationalised accordingly.
  • The Central Information Commissioner has been given the status of a Supreme Court judge.
  • But, his judgments can be challenged in the High Courts, which is inconsistent.
  • Besides, the RTI Act did not give the government rule-making powers, which the amendment proposes to correct.

Way forward:

  • Independent structures set up to regulate and monitor the government are vital to a democratic state committed to deliver justice and constitutional guarantees.
  • The separation of powers is a concept which underscores this independence and is vital to our democratic checks and balances.
  • So when power is centralised, the freedom of expression is threatened which can lead to the decline of democracy.

Conclusion:

RTI Act has transparency, accountability and participation as its mandate and is considered equally important legal document after the Constitution. There is a necessity to undertake the measures to strengthen this powerful tool that can deliver significant social benefits.


Topic: Government policies and interventions for development in various sectors and issues arising out of their design and implementation, Media

3) What is Paid news? Discuss the reasons for rise in paid news in India and also suggest solutions to the menace of paid news.(250 words)

Reference

Why this question:

 Recently Union Information and Broadcasting Minister Prakash Javadekar informed Rajya Sabha about the steps being taken by the Government to curb the menace of Paid News.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must discuss the context and reasons for rise in paid news and one must suggest solutions to curb the problems of this paid news.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Define what is paid news.

Body:

Paid news is defined as any news or analysis appearing in print or electronic media for consideration in cash or kind. Manifestations of paid news are: 

Advertisements camouflaged as news, Denial of coverage to select electoral candidates, exchanging of advertisement space for equity stakes between media houses and corporate.

Explain the recent trends witnessed in terms of paid news in India.

What are the various counter measures to overcome the challenge of paid news?

Conclusion:

Conclude with solutions.

Introduction:

The Press Council of India (PCI) defines paid news as any news or analysis appearing in print or electronic media for consideration in cash or kind. This type of news is typically sponsored by politicians, businessmen, and celebrities in order to improve their public image or accomplish political goals.

Body:

Manifestations of paid news are:

  • Advertisements camouflaged as news.
  • Denial of coverage to select electoral candidates.
  • Exchanging of advertisement space for equity stakes between media houses and corporate.

Reasons for rise in paid news:

  • Corporatisation of media
  • Owners having themselves the editorial roles.
  • Decline in autonomy of editors/journalists due to emergence of contract system and poor wage levels of journalists
  • Lack of restriction on ownership across media segments or between content and distribution could give rise to monopolistic practices.

Challenges posed:

  • Paid news is a grave election malpractice and is not recognized as an offence by Representation of Peoples Act.
  • In many cases, money spent on paid news is not represented in elections expenditure and is a punishable offence.
  • There has been a lot of discussion on paid news including a parliamentary standing committee report on the subject, yet there is no consensus on how to deal with the problem.
  • Existing regulatory set-up dealing with paid news is inadequ
  • Universally profit-maximizing entities will act to increase returns rather than look at social externalities.

Way forward:

  • It is a reminder for the amendment of RPA Act, 1951.
  • A legal framework in which electoral issues are expeditiously adjudicated must also be put in place if election law is to be enforced in both letter and spirit.
  • Define what constitutes paid political news, so that Press Council of India can adopt appropriate guidelines.
  • Periodic review of the editor/journalist autonomy and wage conditions.
  • Financial accounts of the media houses should be subject to examination, especially the revenue source for a suspected paid news case.
  • Regulator(s) should have the power to take strong action against offenders and should not include media owners/interested parties as members.
  • Transparent and unbiased policy for distribution of advertisements by the central and state governments, with provisions for scrutiny.
  • Conduct study to evaluate the mechanism adopted by other countries to tackle the problem of paid news.
  • Naming and shaming of media houses involved in paid new
  • In India, a more alert citizenry can make a difference by bringing the problem of paid news to the public domain.

Conclusion:

The media acts as a repository of public trust for conveying correct and true information to the people. The “paid news” is therefore, a serious matter as it influences the functioning of a free press. There is an urgent need to protect the right of the public to accurate information before voters exercise their franchise when such incidents are on rise. Hence, a legal framework in which electoral issues are expeditiously adjudicated must be put in place if election laws are to be enforced in both letter and spirit.


Topic:Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment.

4) Discuss the Objectives of Environmental Impact Assessment in India also trace the recent developments in this direction while commenting on the current framework of the same. (250 words)

Reference

Why this question:

The question is straightforward and is about analyzing the EIA process and its objectives.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must discuss in detail the objectives of EIA and trace the recent developments in this direction.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Describe what is EIA.

Body:

Explain the Objectives of Environmental Impact Assessment

  • Identifying, predicting and evaluating economic, environmental and social impacts of development activities.
  • Providing information on the environmental consequences for decision making.
  • Promoting environmentally sound and suitable development by identifying appropriate alternatives and mitigation measures.

Discuss the importance and relevance.

Explain the framework existing in India, progress made on different fronts etc.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is an important management tool for ensuring optimal use of natural resources for sustainable development. It covers developmental sectors such as industries, thermal power projects, mining schemes etc.  EIA has now been made mandatory under the Environmental (Protection Act, 1986) for 29 categories of developmental activities involving investments of Rs. 50 crores and above.

Body:

The objective of the EIA:

  • To identify, predict and evaluate the economic, environmental and social impact of development activities.
  • To provide information on the environmental consequences for decision making.
  • To promote environmentally sound and sustainable development through the identification of appropriate alternatives and mitigation measures.
  • To identify  and  quantify  emission  sources  and  determine  the  significance  of  impacts  on sensitive receivers and potential affected uses.
  • To identify  and  quantify  any  potential  losses  or  damage  to  flora,  fauna  and  natural habitats.

Issues Related to EIA:

  • Environmental decision-making processes for development projects are supposed to use the best available scientific knowledge to ensure that development does not lead to negative impacts.
  • But there are compromised decision-making on development and infrastructure projects.
  • Sometimes the EIA reports lack the expected degrees of honesty, owing to bias, corruption, exaggeration and wrong claims.
  • EIA reports for the approved “redevelopment” projects in Delhi were prepared by copying from copyrighted papers, web-pages and other EIA reports.
  • There are many instances of missing or misleading information which understate the potential impact of the projects.
  • Many projects are approved without public consultation.
  • Lack of awareness among the local people about the process of EIA, its significance for them, their own rights and responsibilities.
  • Most of the time EIA reports are unavailable in local languages, thus local people are unable to decipher the reports, and are misled by the proponents

Way Forward:

  • Competent authorities must ensure that a project causes minimal adverse environmental impact and generates maximum social and economic benefits.
  • Involving affected people and concerned citizens in environmental decision-making has far reaching effects.
  • It allows for democratising environmental governance.
  • Participatory processes give opportunities to understand and plan for unforeseen effects.
  • In 2009, the Delhi High Court in Utkarsh Mandal v/s Union of India upheld that it is the duty of the EACs to consider the merits of the objections raised at the public hearings.
  • Women and other vulnerable sections of the society are the first and most affected by consequences of developmental processes and damage to the environment.
  • Adverse impacts of development projects can be reduced with the full and equal participation of both genders, particularly women in decision-making processes.
  • NGOs, civil society groups and local communities need to build their capacities to use the EIA notification towards better decision making on projects.

Conclusion:

An EIA should not be used just as a means for obtaining an environmental clearance; rather, project proponents should use it as a management tool to assess the soundness of a project plan.  The focus of EIA needs to shift from utilization and exploitation of natural resources to conservation of natural resources.


Topic Conservation, environmental pollution and degradation, environmental impact assessment.

5) Biofuels hold huge potential for India’s future and current energy needs, critically analyse whether the national policy on biofuels is the step in the right direction to help India unlock its biofuel potential? (250 words)

 

Why this question:

The Government has allowed the direct sale of biodiesel (B100) for blending with high speed diesel to all consumers, in accordance with the specified blending limits and the standards specified by the Bureau of Indian Standards, with effect from 29th June, 2017.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must discuss the salient features of NBP-2018 and discuss the potential biofuels hold for India.

Directive:

Critically analyzeWhen asked to analyse, you have to examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them as a whole in a summary. When ‘critically’ is suffixed or prefixed to a directive, one needs to look at the good and bad of the topic and give a fair judgement.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Begin with brief on what are biofuels.

Body:

Discussion should include the following: 

The National Policy on Biofuels-2018 approved by the Government envisages an indicative target of 20% blending of ethanol in petrol and 5% blending of bio-diesel in diesel by 2030.

Discuss the National Policy on biofuels; its salient features.

Discuss the prospects of Biofuels across the country, its potential based on facts and figures.

Conclusion:

Conclude with way forward.

Introduction:

Any hydrocarbon fuel that is produced from an organic matter (living or once living material) in a short period of time (days, weeks, or even months) is considered a biofuel. Biofuels may be solid, liquid or gaseous in nature. The National Policy on Biofuels-2018 approved by the Government envisages an indicative target of 20% blending of ethanol in petrol and 5% blending of bio-diesel in diesel by 2030.

Body:

National Policy on Biofuels, 2018:

Prospects:

  • Import dependency: The policy aims at reducing import dependency.
  • Cleaner environment: By reducing crop burning & conversion of agricultural residues/wastes to biofuels there will be further reduction in Green House Gas emissions.
  • Health benefits: Prolonged reuse of Cooking Oil for preparing food, particularly in deep-frying is a potential health hazard and can lead to many diseases. Used Cooking Oil is a potential feedstock for biodiesel and its use for making biodiesel will prevent diversion of used cooking oil in the food industry.
  • Employment Generation: One 100klpd 2G bio refinery can contribute 1200 jobs in Plant Operations, Village Level Entrepreneurs and Supply Chain Management.
  • Additional Income to Farmers: By adopting 2G technologies, agricultural residues/waste which otherwise are burnt by the farmers can be converted to ethanol and can fetch a price for these waste if a market is developed for the same.

Shortcomings:

  • Efforts taken to achieve Biofuel production could lead to food security and strain water resources.
  • According to critics, the policy is overly ambitious. Given the constraints in technology and current abysmally low status of blending (2%), the targets of the 2018 policy are too ambitious to be fulfilled
  • The policy is totally silent on octane (which is blended with petrol) which has direct consequences of air quality and pollution.
  • The policy advocates the use of untested technologies like the production of 2G ethanol. Relying technology which is commercially untested is not a viable option.
  • According to critics, the ways in which companies are selected to develop and boost Biofuel in India is not transparent.
  • Other biofuels, such as jatropha, have often proven to be commercially unviable.
  • Achieving 20% blend rate would require India to divert an extra one-tenth of its net sown area towards sugarcane.
  • Any such land requirement is likely to put a stress on other crops and has the potential to increase food prices.

Way forward:

  • The government must examine the feasibility of importing ethanol in the interim, thereby creating consistency of supply, and providing relief from the pollution created by fossil fuel burning.
  • Facilitating import of ethanol will make up for the inconsistency in the availability of domestic ethanol
  • There should be focus on 1G mechanism of ethanol blending instead of 2G ethanol blending.
  • Bio-fuel policy must be strongly backed by sufficient technology and production scale in order to be financially feasible and implementable.
  • It is important to boost the supply chain infrastructure. Private investments in building supply chain should be encouraged
  • Biofuels programme in India has been largely impacted due to the sustained and quantum non-availability of domestic feedstock for biofuel production which needs to be addressed.

Conclusion:

Globally, biofuels have caught the attention in last decade and it is imperative to keep up with the pace of developments in the field of biofuels. Biofuels in India are of strategic importance as it augers well with the ongoing initiatives of the Government such as Make in India, Swachh Bharat Abhiyan, Skill Development and offers great opportunity to integrate with the ambitious targets of doubling of Farmers Income, Import Reduction, Employment Generation, Waste to Wealth Creation.


Topic: Ethics and Human Interface: Essence, determinants and consequences of Ethics in human actions; dimensions of ethics; ethics in private and public relationships. Human Values – lessons from the lives and teachings of great leaders, reformers and administrators; role of family, society and educational institutions in inculcating values.

6) ‘The civil servant who is not feared is not respected and so are his decisions’. Critically analyse.(250 words)

Ethics by Lexicon publications

Why this question:

The question is based on the work culture that a civil servant is expected to profess.

Key demand of the question:

The answer must discuss in what way the working of the civil servant and work culture of the organization depend more on the nature of the employees. If in the organization, work is inherently distasteful

to most people, and they attempt to avoid work whenever possible, then administrator needs to be more authoritarian and actively intervene to get things done.

Directive:

Critically analyzeWhen asked to analyse, you have to examine methodically the structure or nature of the topic by separating it into component parts and present them as a whole in a summary. When ‘critically’ is suffixed or prefixed to a directive, one needs to look at the good and bad of the topic and give a fair judgement.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Discuss in brief the context of the question first.

Body:

In governance and administration, role of fear and respect both are important. If an administrator is weak, malleable, palpable, permissive and compromising on all issues, he/ she loses the element of fear among those who do not comply with laws and directives. But use of force to generate a reasonable amount of fear should be used scrupulously and with a human approach marked by a sense of proportionality with respect of the gravity of no conformation or compliance. The primitive societies, the nascent democracies or failing states which have weak institutions and which lack people’s trust; it becomes inevitable to use brute power for compliance of law and order.

However, the statement that the civil servant who is not feared is not respected and so are his decisions, denotes a coercive approach of governance. This does not work well in the medium and long term and there are boomerang effects, protests, and resistance and finally, it may lead to distrust, disorder, and anarchy.

Conclusion:

Conclude by reasserting need for a balanced approach.

Introduction:

The above statement shows the colonial way of working of the bureaucracy. This approach is more traditional conventional approach of decision making. Back in the day

Body:

It emerged in the times when decisions were taken at higher level and lower level officials only implemented it. This is true depiction of Max Weber’s bureaucratic hierarchy. It is still very highly followed in military police security agencies. The benefits of this approach are

  • It ensures discipline in organization.
  • Coherence in implementation of the policies
  • Time bound completion of projects.

 

However this approach has lots of limitations.

Thus, there has been a different approach in today’s administration.

  • Conception of leadership itself has been changed now.
  • Rather than fear it is mutual respect which works better in today’s organisation.
  • It is not true that fear gives respect.
  • It doesn’t take creativity and potential present at various levels of organisation.

Conclusion:

During decision making if all the concerned people are involved in it; it makes decision more closer to reality and better chance of success. This involves an element of Emotional Intelligence in the decision making. Recent thrust on decentralization and participative decision making is the process in this.


Topic:  Aptitude and foundational values for Civil Service , integrity, impartiality and non-partisanship, objectivity, dedication to public service, empathy, tolerance and compassion towards the weaker sections.

7) What do you mean by integrity? Why integrity is called the supreme quality of leadership? What is the relation between honesty, integrity, and probity in administration? Discuss.  (250 words)

 Ethics by Lexicon publications

Why this question:

The question is based on the concept of integrity and how it is a supreme quality of leadership.

Key demand of the question:

Explain in detail what you understand by integrity, bring out its importance and then provide detailed correlation between honesty, integrity and aptitude.

Directive:

DiscussThis is an all-encompassing directive – you have to debate on paper by going through the details of the issues concerned by examining each one of them. You have to give reasons for both for and against arguments.

Structure of the answer:

Introduction: 

Define integrity – Integrity is a term used to describe a person’s level of honesty, moral commitments, and willingness to do what’s right.

Body:

Discuss why is integrity important?

Integrity is an essential quality of successful leadership because:

 Integrity as wholeness, i.e., integrity consists of a manager’s personal values, daily actions, and basic organizational aims.

Integrity as consistency between words and actions, i.e., a demonstrated consistency with regards to social behaviour. Etc.

Then move onto discuss relation between Honesty, Integrity and Probity in Administration.

Provide for case studies.

Conclusion:

Conclude by re stating the importance of integrity in all spheres of life.

Introduction:

Integrity is the practice of synchronisation of thought, words and actions. It can be correlated to honesty but unlike honesty it’s more a professional value. It’s related to institution. It advocates sacrifice of personal gains in favour of organisational objectives

Body:

Integrity in its bare-bones essence means adherence to principles. It is a three-step process:

  • Choosing the right course of conduct
  • Acting consistently with the choice even when it is inconvenient or unprofitable to do so
  • Openly declaring where one stands.
  • Accordingly, integrity is equated with moral reflection, steadfastness to commitments, trustworthiness

Integrity is supreme quality of leadership – Dwight Eisenhower

  • If leader acts with integrity, that leader will treat the employees’ right and do what’s best for the business.
  • Ethical behavior starts at the top and allows companies to create a culture that values integrity.
  • Leaders with integrity actually strengthen the business. Companies with strong, ethical management teams enhance their ability to attract investors, customers and talented professionals.
  • The link between integrity and trust cannot be overestimated in the leader-employee relationship.
  • Leaders with integrity hold themselves accountable not just to their superiors but also to their peers and staff.
  • They treat everyone fairly, regardless of a person’s standing in the organization.

Probity, honesty and Integrity:

  • Probity entails integrity, uprightness and honesty.
  • For Government workers and agencies, maintaining probity involves more than simply avoiding dishonest conduct.
  • Probity is also considered as being incorruptible.
  • Probity in Governance also elucidates that apart from the traditional civil service values of efficiency, integrity, accountability and patriotism, it is essential for civil officers to instruct and adopt ethical and moral values.
  • It includes probity in public life, respect for human rights and compassion for the downtrodden and commitment to their welfare.

Conclusion:

Present day civil servants needs to perform multiple functions of giving suggestions to political representatives, addressing public grievances, institutionalisation of the socio economic changes, delivering goods and services. Hence a value committed bureaucracy is need of hour.