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Genetic studies on the people of the Lakshadweep archipelago

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  1. Awareness in the fields of IT, Space, Computers, robotics, nano-technology, bio-technology and issues relating to intellectual property rights.

 

Genetic studies on the people of the Lakshadweep archipelago

 

What to study?

For prelims: CCMB, need for and objectives of Genetic studies.

For mains: significance and potential of the project, concerns associated.

 

Context: Genetic studies on the people of the Lakshadweep archipelago was done by a team of CSIR-Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), for the first time.

 

Key findings:

  • A majority of human ancestry in Lakshadweep is largely derived from South Asia with minor influences from East and West Eurasia.
  • There is a close genetic link of Lakshadweep islanders with people from Maldives, Sri Lanka and India.

 

Background:

The islands were known to sailors since ancient times and historical documents say that the spread of Buddhism to these islands happened during 6th century B.C. and Islam was spread by in 661 A.D. by Arabians.

Cholas ruled the islands in 11th century, Portuguese in 16th century, Ali Rajahs in 17th, Tipu Sultan in 18th before the British Raj of 19th century.

 

About Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology:

  • The Centre for Cellular & Molecular Biology (CCMB) is a premier research organization which conducts high quality basic research and trainings in frontier areas of modern biology, and promote centralized national facilities for new and modern techniques in the interdisciplinary areas of biology.
  • It was set up initially as a semi-autonomous Centre on April 1, 1977 with the Biochemistry Division of the then Regional Research Laboratory (presently, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, IICT) Hyderabad.
  • It is located in Hyderabad and operates under the aegis of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR).
  • It is designated as “Center of Excellence” by the Global Molecular and Cell Biology Network, UNESCO.

 

Sources: The Hindu.