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1) Indian ancient architecture is much more than what they are. What teachings can one draw from India’s ancient inscriptions and temples in conserving water and fighting droughts today? Examine.(250 words)

Topic: Indian Culture will cover the salient aspects of Art forms, Literature and Architecture from ancient to modern times.

1) Indian ancient architecture is much more than what they are. What teachings can one draw from India’s ancient inscriptions and temples in conserving water and fighting droughts today? Examine.(250 words)

The hindu

Why this question:

The article provides for deep insights on the use of ancient inscriptions in temples and their architecture in managing the droughts of today.

Key demand of the question:

The question expects you to highlight the significance of Ancient Indian architecture ; inscriptions, temples and associated water conservation technologies and techniques that can be put to use even today to effectively manage water crisis.

Directive:

ExamineWhen asked to ‘Examine’, we have to look into the topic (content words) in detail, inspect it, investigate it and establish the key facts and issues related to the topic in question. While doing so we should explain why these facts and issues are important and their implications

Structure of the answer:

Introduction:

Brief upon the wisdom present in the ancient Indian culture with respect to water conservation and drought management techniques.

Body:

  • Such answers are best explained with examples, discuss the significance of ancient Indian culture – temple architecture , inscriptions that throw light upon conserving water as a useful resource.
  • Explain the example of Tamil Nadu – Inscriptions connected to irrigation in Tamil Nadu concern two broad zones, the Cauvery delta and the Tamirabarani delta. The Cauvery delta was more fertile and larger — with more tributaries — but the number of drought-related inscriptions here are more in number than the Tamirabarani delta. Temple inscriptions were always documents connected with the sale, transfer and maintenance of irrigated lands.
  • In the Pandya empire, water conservation was a completely local affair. The entire community, through the elected temple mahasabha, managed it. This meant that there was constant supervision, ownership and responsibility. All systems and processes were sustained through an emotional connection with the resource.
  • Explain how such methods can be imitated even today.

Conclusion:

Conclude with significance of learnings that can be taken from our past in managing water as a crucial resource for life.