WEEKLY UPSC IAS ESSAY WRITING CHALLENGE – 2015

Following are the topics on which our followers have written (and writing essays) every Sunday to hone their essay writing skills. The topics are chosen based on UPSC previous year topics. Writing one essay on each Sunday will help you get better marks in this paper.

2013 Essay Challenges

2014 Essay Challenges


ESSAY STRATEGY by Topper – Rank 25 CSE 2015

ESSAY STRATEGY by Topper – Rank 40 CSE 2015

WEEKLY UPSC IAS ESSAY WRITING CHALLENGES – 2017

  1. October 15, 2017: Biggest Threat to Humanity – Moral Crisis or Climate Change?
  2. October 08, 2017: The monsoon is a defining aspect of India’s nationhood
  3. October 01, 2017: India’s Infrastructure Story – Why is India not able to Build like China?
  4. September 24, 2017:  Impact of Digital Technologies on Globalisation
  5. September 17, 2017: Urbanisation and Solid Waste Management in India – Challenges and Opportunities
  6. September 10,2017: Gender Equality and Peace: Are They Connected?
  7. September 03, 2017: Recent Natural Disasters – What do they Reveal about Humanity?
  8. August 27, 2017: Godmen – A Threat to Indian Society and Culture
  9. August 20, 2017: Corruption in India: Neither Systemic Reforms nor Surgical Strikes would End it
  10. August 13,2017:  Interrelationship between Gender Equality and Sustainable Development
  11. August 06, 2017: Utility and relevance of Parliament in our polity 
  12. July 30, 2017: Caste System – Source of India’s Eternal Inequality?
  13. July 23, 2017:  Indian Democracy, Media and Public Opinion – Does Public Opinion Matter in Policymaking? 
  14. July 16, 2017: Poverty and Environment – Their Interrelationship is the Key to Sustainable World
  15. July 09, 2017: Soft Power is India’s Strength, not its Weakness
  16. July 02, 2017: Technology and Jobs – Is Technology a Curse?
  17. June 25, 2017: Democracy’s Relevance in the Face of New Global Threats
  18. June 18, 2017: Federalism in India – Competitive or Cooperative? 
  19. June 11, 2017: Peace, Environment and Development: Are these Interrelated?
  20. June 04, 2017:  Role of Technology in Development – Is Technology Helping or Hindering Development?
  21. May 28, 2017: Poverty is a State of Mind
  22. May 21, 2017: Does India Need Superpower Status?
  23. May 14, 2017: India’s Achilles Heel – Lack of Ambition or Lack of Leadership in Achieving Greatness?
  24. May 07, 2017: Don’t limit a child to your own learning, for he was born in another time.
  25. April 29, 2017: The greatest happiness of the greatest number is the foundation of morals and legislation
  26. April 23, 2017: To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom
  27. April 16, 2017: One-Party-Dominant System – Is it Good for India?
  28. April 09, 2017: Should Youth in India Consider Politics as Career?
  29. April 02, 2017: Can World Save Succeeding Generations from the Scourge of War?
  30. March 26, 2017: Low, stagnating female labour-force participation in India: An anomaly or an outcome of economic reforms?
  31. March 19, 2017: When a man is denied the right to live the life he believes in, he has no choice but to become an outlaw
  32. March 12, 2017: The marks humans leave are too often scars
  33. March 05, 2017: Environmental Challenges and Geopolitics: How to save our Environment?
  34. February 27, 2017: Radical Solutions are Needed to Address Today’s Radical Problems
  35. February 19, 2017: India’s Importance in the Post-truth World
  36. February 12, 2017: The Role of Politics in Development
  37. February 05, 2017: Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored
  38. January 29, 2017: Building Walls and Banning Refugees – Does this Help Humanity?
  39. January 22, 2017: Digital economy: A leveller or a source of economic inequality
  40. January 15, 2017: Cyberspace and internet: Blessing or curse to the human civilization in the long run
  41. January 08, 2017:  Water disputes between states in federal India
  42. January 01, 2017: Need brings greed, if greed increases it spoils breed

WEEKLY UPSC IAS ESSAY WRITING CHALLENGES – 2016

  1. (December 25, 2016) – Cooperative federalism: Myth or reality
  2. (December 18, 2016) – Innovation is the key determinant of economic growth and social welfare
  3. (December 11, 2016) – Near jobless growth in India: An anomaly or an outcome of economic reforms
  4. (December 04, 2016) – If development is not engendered, it is endangered
  5. (November 27, 2016) – Social media is better at breaking things than at making things
  6. (November 20, 2016) – Deglobalization is good for the world
  7. (November 12, 2016) – Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others
  8. (November 06, 2016) – It is not inequality which is the real misfortune, it is dependence
  9. (October 30, 2016) – Reducing Poverty while also Conserving Nature is an Impossible Task
  10. (October 23, 2016) – Poverty can be  eliminated by putting science at the heart of development
  11. (October 16, 2016) – People shouldn’t be afraid of their government. Governments should be afraid of their people
  12. (October 09, 2016) – Better Access is Key to Inclusive Cities
  13. (October 02, 2016) – The weaker sections of Indian society – Are their Rights and Access to Justice Getting Better?
  14. (September 25, 2016) – Imagination is more important than intelligence
  15. (September 18, 2016) – Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life
  16. (September 11, 2016) – Not what we have But what we enjoy, constitutes our abundance
  17. (September 04, 2016) – It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it
  18. (August 28, 2016) – If one can Address Moral Crisis, many of World’s Problems can be Solved
  19. (August 21, 2016) – Overdependence on Technology will Advance Human Development
  20. (August 14, 2016) – Geography may remain the same ; history need not
  21. (August 07, 2016) – Knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom
  22. (July 31, 2016) – To live is the rarest thing in the world. Most people exist, that is all
  23. (July 24, 2016) – True knowledge exists in knowing that you know nothing
  24. (July 17, 2016) – We Can Not Fight Terrorism – We have to Live With it
  25. (July 10, 2016) – A house divided against itself cannot stand
  26. (July 02, 2016) – When the going gets tough, the tough get going
  27. (June 26, 2016) – India a Reluctant Participant in the New Global Order?
  28. (June 19, 2016) – Inclusiveness in India – Still a Dream?
  29. (June 12, 2016) – No one can make you feel inferior without your consent
  30. (June 05, 2016) – Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted
  31. (May 29, 2016) – It is hard to free fools from the chains they revere
  32. (May 22, 2016) – Honest disagreement is often a good sign of progress
  33. (May 15, 2016) – Fire is a good servant but a bad master
  34. (May 08, 2016) – The grass is always greener on the other side of the fence
  35. (May 01, 2016) – Labour Reforms in India and its Role in Economic Development 
  36. (April 24, 2016) – It takes a whole village to raise a child
  37. (April 17, 2016) – Trust take years to Build, Seconds to Break
  38. (April 10, 2016) – Cleanliness is next to Godliness
  39. (April 03, 2016) – Honesty is the Best Policy
  40. (March 27, 2016) – Before criticizing a man, walk a mile in his shoes
  41. (March 20, 2016) – Caste System – India’s Enduring Curse
  42. (March 13, 2016) – Fortune favors the bold
  43. (March 06, 2016) – Quick but steady wins the race
  44. (February 28, 2016) – Dreams which should not let India sleep
  45. (February 21, 2016) – Lending hands to someone is better than giving a dole
  46. (February 14, 2016) – Technology cannot replace manpower
  47. (February 7, 2016) – Character of an institution is reflected in its leader
  48. (January 31, 2016) – Can Capitalism bring Inclusive Growth?
  49. (January 24, 2016) – Crisis Faced in India – Moral or Economic?
  50. (January 17, 2016) – Too many cooks spoil the broth
  51. (January 10, 2016) – The Best Things in Life are Free
  52. (January 3, 2016) – Don’t count your chickens before they hatch.

 


 

WEEKLY ESSAY WRITING CHALLENGES – 2015

  1. 27 December 2015
  2. 20 December 2015
  3. 13 December 2015
  4. 06 December 2015
  5. 28 November 2015
  6. 21 November 2015
  7. 15 November 2015
  8. 08 November 2015
  9. 01 November 2015
  10. 25 October 2015
  11. 18 October 2015
  12. 11 October 2015
  13. 04 October 2015
  14. 27 September 2015
  15. 20 September 2015
  16. 13 September 2015
  17. 06 September 2015
  18. 31 August 2015
  19. 30 August 2015
  20. 23 August 2015
  21. 16 August 2015
  22. 09 August 2015
  23. 01 August 2015
  24. 26 July 2015
  25. 19 July 2015
  26. 12 July 2015
  27. 05 July 2015
  28. 28 June 2015
  29. 21 June 2015
  30. 14 June 2015
  31. 07 June 2015
  32. 31 May 2015
  33. 24 May 2015
  34. 17 May 2015
  35. 10 May 2015
  36. 03 May 2015
  37. 26 April 2015
  38. 19 April 2015
  39. 12 April 2015
  40. 05 April 2015
  41. 29 March 2015
  42. 22 March 2015
  43. 15 March 2015
  44. 01 March 2015
  45. 22 February 2015
  46. 15 February 2015
  47. 08 February 2015
  48. 01 February 2015
  49. 25 January 2015
  50. 18 January 2015
  51. 11 January 2015
  52. 04 January 2015
  • AAshheeshh RAhi

    Last September, India put a spacecraft into orbit around Mars. Since then, boasts about the country’s scientific prowess have grown outlandishly. In October, Prime Minister Narendra Modi pointed to the half-human, half-elephant Hindu god Ganesh as evidence that ancient Indians had pioneered the art of plastic surgery. Over the weekend, science and technology minister Harsh Vadhan told delegates to the Indian Science Congress—an annual gathering of the country’s top researchers—that Indian mathematicians had discovered the Pythagorean theorem and graciously allowed the Greeks to take credit. Other speakers claimed that bacteria in cow dung could turn objects into solid gold, and that 7,000 years ago, Indians were flying huge airplanes “from one planet to another.” As ludicrous as these claims are, what should really worry Indians is the current state of the country’s research sector. Despite high-profile successes such as the Mars mission, and its well-known prowess in information technology, India lags badly in technological research and development. Forget 7,000-year-old planes: After more than 30 years of trying, the country still hasn’t been able to develop an indigenous fighter aircraft—technology for which is widely available globally. India spends less than 1% of its gross domestic product (GDP) on R&D. China spends 2%, the US 2.8%, Japan 3.4% and Korea 4%. India’s share of global R&D stands at a dismal 2.7%—compared with 30% for the US. Even China now accounts for almost 15% of such spending, having doubled in total between 2008 and 2012. It isn’t entirely surprising that India lays out so little on research. A majority of R&D spending takes place in the manufacturing sector—particularly at the upper end of the value chain—and India has a very weak manufacturing base compared with the US, China, Japan and Korea. In principle, any policy changes that boosted manufacturing—Modi has promised to improve India’s ranking in the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business Survey from 141 to 50—would also lead to increased R&D spending. At the same time, though, India gets less than it should out of the money that it does spend. The fighter-jet project has stumbled along in part because state-controlled Hindustan Aeronautics Ltd has a monopoly on the plane’s manufacture. The company suffers from all the red tape and inefficiency that plagues the rest of India’s huge public sector. It lacks the autonomy to make bold decisions. It can’t attract top engineering talent with its rigid (and low) salary scales. At the Science Congress, Modi emphasized the need to trim back this kind of red tape. The government should also loosen its stranglehold over state-run laboratories and technical universities such as the famed Indian Institutes of Technology (IIT). Only last week, the head of Delhi’s IIT resigned under pressure from the ministry of education. That kind of micro-management drives talent away and shifts the focus from science and technology—the IITs’ core competence—to managing politics. Of course, the government has an important role to play in promoting basic research. But ideally the state should act more as a facilitator, encouraging greater cooperation between academia, laboratories and private industry and where necessary supporting R&D through financial resources (including for higher salaries to attract talent), but without managerial interference. In the US, federal government spending on R&D peaked at around 1.2% of GDP in the late 1980s. While it’s since dropped under 1%, even now 63% of the funding for academic R&D in the US comes from the government. In other spheres like defence, the government supports research by being a big buyer of high-tech equipment. For India, foreign investment should provide another key source of funding. The country boasts a strong base of trained scientists and engineers available for a fraction of the cost in advanced economies. To fulfill that potential, however, the country needs to continue strengthening its weak patents regime and improving what remains a generally hostile investment for foreign businesses. There’s little time to waste—and not just because pseudo-scientific quackery seem to be on the rise. India set up its first IIT in 1950, at a time when Korea was still wracked by civil war and China was about to embark on decades of Maoist chaos. If the country is to catch up to its Asian peers, it needs to start now

  • pal

    no essay today 🙁